Advertisement
If you have a new account but are having problems posting or verifying your account, please email us on hello@boards.ie for help. Thanks :)
Hello all! Please ensure that you are posting a new thread or question in the appropriate forum. The Feedback forum is overwhelmed with questions that are having to be moved elsewhere. If you need help to verify your account contact hello@boards.ie

The Quiz marque 2

Options
15455565759

Comments

  • Moderators, Arts Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators, Social & Fun Moderators Posts: 76,588 Mod ✭✭✭✭New Home


    Which landlocked countries are doubly-landlocked, meaning that they border only with other landlocked countries?


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,636 ✭✭✭feargale


    New Home wrote: »
    Which landlocked countries are doubly-landlocked, meaning that they border only with other landlocked countries?

    Liechtenstein and Uzbekistan.


  • Moderators, Arts Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators, Social & Fun Moderators Posts: 76,588 Mod ✭✭✭✭New Home


    That didn't take long at all.... unlike the phobia of marshmallows.


  • Registered Users Posts: 28,190 ✭✭✭✭looksee


    Fear of Marshmallows seems like an odd one, but when my youngest was about 18 months she was given a marshmallow sweet (one of those pink, drum-shaped things) which she promptly inhaled. When I saw her choking I picked her up by her ankles, swung her upside down and gave her a whack on the back, at which the marshmallow popped out. The Heimlich manoeuvre wasn't well known at that stage :D The reaction to a toddler being suddenly hauled upside down in a supermarket was funny, varying between horror at 'what the hell are you doing' to 'that was quick thinking'!


  • Registered Users Posts: 28,190 ✭✭✭✭looksee


    Calling feargale! We need you to confirm the storm question and offer another for the landlocked countries one.

    Meanwhile I will throw out another question see if we can get things moving again -

    What exactly is a decoction, (compared with, say, an infusion).


  • Advertisement
  • Moderators, Arts Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators, Social & Fun Moderators Posts: 76,588 Mod ✭✭✭✭New Home


    Decoction is when you boil the leaves (roots, whatever) in the liquid, infusion is when you pour the boiling liquid on top of the leaves (roots, whatever) and let them steep, like with tea. I think you can also have a cold infusion, but you can never have a cold decoction.


  • Registered Users Posts: 28,190 ✭✭✭✭looksee


    I should have known I would not slip that question past you NH! Yes, boiling is the essential part of the procedure.


  • Moderators, Arts Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators, Social & Fun Moderators Posts: 76,588 Mod ✭✭✭✭New Home


    What's the Latin etymology of decoction? Approximate answers are perfectly acceptable.

    (Sorry but I can't think of any decent questions, at the moment)


  • Registered Users Posts: 28,190 ✭✭✭✭looksee


    Is it something to do with reducing? I don't really know the Latin base though, I am vaguely muddling through 'decocting a concoction'.


  • Moderators, Arts Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators, Social & Fun Moderators Posts: 76,588 Mod ✭✭✭✭New Home


    The "de" corresponds to reducing, ("down"), by and large. The "coction" part has the same root as many other words we use all the time. Hint: think of the process and to what happens.


  • Advertisement
  • Registered Users Posts: 28,190 ✭✭✭✭looksee


    Yes I had kinda got 'together' from the 'co' bit, but I am floundering generally.


  • Registered Users Posts: 28,190 ✭✭✭✭looksee


    Ok, looked it up, the co is wrong, its kind of obvious once you know.


  • Moderators, Arts Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators, Social & Fun Moderators Posts: 76,588 Mod ✭✭✭✭New Home


    It's easier if you can speak another language, too. :)


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,636 ✭✭✭feargale


    looksee wrote: »
    Calling feargale! We need you to confirm the storm question and offer another for the landlocked countries one.

    What is the capital city of Trinidad?

    Answer to storm question is Evert.


  • Moderators, Arts Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators, Social & Fun Moderators Posts: 76,588 Mod ✭✭✭✭New Home


    Santa Cruz?

    Scrap that, that was where my pen pal lived (in Cantaro Village, Upper Santa Cruz, to be precise. :)).

    The capital is Port of Spain.

    Very easy one - on the same note, what's the capital of Haiti?


  • Moderators, Arts Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators, Social & Fun Moderators Posts: 76,588 Mod ✭✭✭✭New Home


    Double bump.


  • Moderators, Arts Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators, Social & Fun Moderators Posts: 76,588 Mod ✭✭✭✭New Home


    Nobody at all?

    Not for the root words of decoction, not for the capital of Haiti?


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,887 ✭✭✭IrishZeus


    New Home wrote: »
    Santa Cruz?

    Scrap that, that was where my pen pal lived (in Cantaro Village, Upper Santa Cruz, to be precise. :)).

    The capital is Port of Spain.

    Very easy one - on the same note, what's the capital of Haiti?

    Port au Prince?


  • Moderators, Arts Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators, Social & Fun Moderators Posts: 76,588 Mod ✭✭✭✭New Home


    Yes, that's correct.


  • Moderators, Arts Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators, Social & Fun Moderators Posts: 76,588 Mod ✭✭✭✭New Home


    New Home wrote: »
    What's the Latin etymology of decoction? Approximate answers are perfectly acceptable.

    (Sorry but I can't think of any decent questions, at the moment)
    New Home wrote: »
    The "de" corresponds to reducing, ("down"), by and large. The "coction" part has the same root as many other words we use all the time. Hint: think of the process and to what happens.

    Ok, time to put this to bed: the "coction" part has the same root as cooking. Decoction means cooking something down.

    https://www.etymonline.com/word/decoction#etymonline_v_867
    decoction (n.)

    late 14c., decoccioun, "liquor in which an animal or vegetable substance has been boiled;" early 15c., "act of boiling in water," from Old French décoction (13c.) or directly from Latin decoctionem (nominative decoctio) "a boiling down," noun of action from past-participle stem of decoquere "to boil down," from de "down" (see de-) + coquere "to cook" (from PIE root *pekw- "to cook, ripen").

    Anyway, this means I have to come up with another question. Darn.
    IrishZeus wrote: »
    Port au Prince?

    Hi IrishZeus, please don't forget about us!


  • Advertisement
  • Registered Users Posts: 1,887 ✭✭✭IrishZeus


    New Home wrote: »
    Hi IrishZeus, please don't forget about us!

    Never... I was just... ahhh... building suspense.... 👀

    A topical one at the moment. For what is Neville Francis Fitzgerald Chamberlain known?


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,393 ✭✭✭Red Hare


    He is know for appeasement of Hitler as far I remember . He came to some sort of agreement with Hitler ( i think it was the invasion of Poland by the Nazi's). there is early film footage of him waving the white paper containing the written agreement as if it were a white flag in the trenches.



  • Registered Users Posts: 28,190 ✭✭✭✭looksee


    Yay, that must be the longest time for an answer so far! Well done RH, have to see if IZ comes back to confirm.



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,887 ✭✭✭IrishZeus


    Ahh… I can’t argue with the answer as I don’t know, but the answer I was looking for is that he is the originator/inventor of Snooker 😬


    Please ask a question!!



  • Registered Users Posts: 28,190 ✭✭✭✭looksee


    He was also appointed Inspector General of the RIC in 1900 till after 1916 when he resigned after he made something of a hash of intelligence gathering in relation to the Easter Rising.

    The appeasement Chamberalain was Arthur Neville Chamberlain.

    Ok, lets see if anyone is around to engage in the quiz...

    Teasel is a majestic weed that is native to Ireland and is valuable for many reasons. It has medicinal uses, is valuable to wildlife and produces a blue or yellow dye depending on how it is treated. Birds, especially goldfinches love the seeds.

    Question: The seedheads long had a use in one particular industry - for what?



  • Moderators, Arts Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators, Social & Fun Moderators Posts: 76,588 Mod ✭✭✭✭New Home


    Chimney sweep?



  • Registered Users Posts: 28,190 ✭✭✭✭looksee


    Oh, that's an interesting thought, but no not what I was looking for. AFAIK they used to use a bunch of furse or gorse (which would be much tougher) tied in a bundle and pull it down the chimney for cleaning.



  • Moderators, Arts Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators, Social & Fun Moderators Posts: 76,588 Mod ✭✭✭✭New Home


    I can't think of anything else at the moment, Looksee - I know that some types of cardoons are used as rennet, but I don't think that applies here. I also know that some spiky plants like the butcher's broom (ruscus) are used to repel mice, but again, I don't think that's the case here.

    Meanwhile, I came across this picture and it brought back so many memories. Does anyone else remember that these were for?




  • Registered Users Posts: 28,190 ✭✭✭✭looksee


    Its an unwindy yoke for a tin of corned beef or spam or sardines. Corned beef still has them.

    I didn't know that about cardoons and rennet. We have a couple of artichoke plants in the garden - very similar to cardoons - quite spectacular, though they have about finished now.

    I will leave the question open 24 hours in case anyone else pops in.



  • Advertisement
  • Registered Users Posts: 6,210 ✭✭✭bonzodog2




Advertisement