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Sub 5 minute mile

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  • Sacksian wrote: »
    Well done! Indoor is generally going to be a little slower than outdoor - get Santa to get you a pair of spikes, keep the training up and go again in the New Year and I guarantee you'll be under 5.

    It might also have been good if you'd be in our heat with more people around you going for sub-5. I really hate running from the front but happy enough though as training has been up and down over the past few months - yourself and IT have me tempted to finally start a log here instead of posting on your logs!

    The indoor cough is an occupational hazard.

    I'd be very interested to follow what you'd do week to week. I know IT (if I was to compare to anyone) does a bit/lot more mileage than me for example. I've talked about upping my mileage but seem to have plateaued at around 20 mpw for the last while. Passed 1,000 km for the year last week though which is definitely a first for me.

    We've baby number 3 due early next year so Santa may not be bringing spikes. Might get a smart watch though :pac: We've a scan on the 17th so I won't get to the NIA again this side of New Year.

    Cheers WW, that's a very good point.




  • Gah, I just noticed I'd posted the wrong hyperlink in the race report. Might deserve a post on it's own anyway. Folks were probably wondering what I meant by leaking air sacs.

    https://www.outsideonline.com/1785581/why-do-i-get-metallic-taste-my-mouth-during-intense-exercise




  • A lot of people get that metallic taste in their mouth after a hard anaerobic effort (particularly after an 800m). Probably shows how hard you're pushing. I don't think it's anything to be concerned about.

    Also, losing concentration in the 3rd quarter of the mile or 1500m is where everyone feels they lose time. Even when you listen to world-class 1500m runners at championship events, they mention the same thing. I think it's a point at which you zone out a little, due to the effort, and then afterwards we reckon that's where the missing seconds were (even though they could have been in the first 400m).

    The rhythm of mile races always seem to be first 409m hard, settle for 400m, then the twilight 400m before going hard for 400m. The most effective way to run it is a positive split too.

    Some strategies I've read about to overcome the twilight zone (and, to be honest, I've never been comfortable or fit enough in the 3rd lap to try them out) is that you specifically target that third lap mentally. Not sure how effective forward planning is when it comes to the middle of a race though. The other strategy is to break the race up into something other than quarters.

    This sort of stuff is what this thread used to be for: https://www.boards.ie/vbulletin//showthread.php?t=2057119644&page=52

    Letsrun.com has loads of threads about middle-distance tactics. There's a lot to wade through. Hopefully, the race on Tuesday gave you the appetite for more!




  • Definitely no expert here, but I've run a few track miles, at least one of which was indoor. I'd say the spikes will go a long way toward getting the required 3 seconds, tbh, and as you've identified, a little bit more commitment between in the third quarter of the race. Congrats on the excellent PB - something to celebrate for sure.




  • Congrats on the PB. I think with a few more mile races experience you will go well below the 5 minute mark. Clane AC are hosting 1 mile race on Friday the 13th of December if that suits you. Outdoor so the weather might be a factor this time of year.


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  • Very little to report here since the race. I've had a combination of voluntary/involuntary time off. 9 days now since I ran now, which is probably no harm at all.

    The week of the race went like this -
    • 03 Dec - 1 mile race - 05:02 PB
    • 04 Dec - 4.65 km steady - 17:13. Not a bad time on this lunchtime run considering the race the night before. Should have run it easy but was working off a little frustration from the night before.
    • 06 Dec - 10 km long run - 38:55. A sub 40 minute 10 km, so was happy with that. Last 2 kms were in 3:37/km pace having gone out in 04:07/km pace for the first 6 km. The outward leg of this route is ever so slightly uphill compared to the return leg so the time differential is likely a little narrower than that.

    Last week was a blank week. After the run on the 6th I took into three 12-hour days of DIY in the spare room which included a Monday "holiday" from work. Room emptied, then gutted and then completely redecorated. Included installation of new coving, skirting and floors. Fell into bed on the Monday and woke up during the night having contracted a gastro bug from one of the kids. This lasted 2 days but took me until the weekend passed to get completely right again. Lost weight I didn't have to lose so I'm now in a good position heading into Christmas :pac:

    As I've passed the 52 weeks since I took on my challenge I'll write up a summary post of my year. Plan is for easy miles for a while. I don't quite have the urge for any hard sessions just yet.




  • Total distance run in 2019: 1,020 kms (approximately)

    So a quick reflection on the 12 months, which is as much for myself.

    Personal running related lessons learned
    • Easy runs are a thing
    • Long runs are needed, even for middle distance running
    • Long runs are longer than I would have thought
    • Progress can be slower than hoped
    • Benefits of interval running
    • Discovery of MilePace workouts
    • Training for the mile did improve my 5 k pace, I think, without putting it to a proper test but not as much as maybe I thought it would. (using my 4.65 km runs as the gauge here)

    Questions still to be answered
    • Do my times really benefit from running in races. This may be down to me not having specific plan to peak for a certain date.


    49233455711_ea6af59510_z.jpg

    The chart above shows that I certainly made progress. I made a 5.25% improvement over the year or a total of 29 seconds on my initial 5:31 attempt. Using a straightline fit I could be at 4:58 by now :pac: but I know it's not that simple and that Gains V Time get smaller the further along I go.

    I was training in parallel with the GAA for most of the year, which I found surprisingly okay to cope with. Although, my initial long runs were not even 5 km. :o

    Over the year-
    [*] my long runs have become longer (still though 10 km is not long enough) [*] my hills went from 30 m to 185 m
    [*] my days per week running went from 2-3 or 4 to 4-5 pretty consistently

    Obviously there were a couple of set backs here and there, all related to illness though and no injuries. I had probably 10 good months out of 12 when all is added up.

    In summary, I didn't hit my target, which should bother me more and does at times but then I reflect. I've followed much more accomplished runners within these logs and see the grind and work that they have put in over longer time frames and often with smaller gains to show for it. All understandable of course when you're coming from a stronger base to begin with. The small gains are to be celebrated too and any day you PB is certainly a good day, is the mantra I've learned, so thanks for that.

    Baby no.3 is due in the late February/early March so I've got a little time left to hit my ultimate goal before all bets are off. Going to try and target another NIA in January hopefully and then see where to after that.

    Signing off the log for 2019, so Happy Christmas and New Year to everyone. Thanks for reading and especially for the sage advice I've received from the posters on here over the past 12 months.




  • Don’t forget you’ve only raced twice (I think?) Times achieved during races are the only ones that count, and racing well is something that takes a while to learn. You’re doing pretty well!




  • So I finished the year at approximately 1,100 km.
    Mile PB: 05:02
    5 km PB: 18:45

    As expected over December I enjoyed more inactive days than active. It involved a few easy runs between 3.5 to 9 km at around 3 runs per week. No sessions.

    My focus for January will be to increase mileage. I've got a feeling that it's my aerobic base that is my main shortcoming. From following other peoples logs, my lack of mileage is what always jumps out at me. I hope to achieve this either by running extra days during the week or increasing the distance on my current runs.

    I finally got a sports watch as a payment in kind which doubled up as a Christmas present so now armed with the new tech I'm hopefully going to learn a bit more. The calculator and google maps won't be needed as much :)

    I'l keep the log going until the end of February anyway and then see from there.




  • Week 01
    • Monday - 6.6 km - 27:21 mins. . Bumpy path
    • Wednesday - 15 x short hills on grass at medium effort. 30 seconds up and 50 seconds rec back down First kind of session in a month so took it easy enough. Hamstrings a little tight afterwards
    • Thursday - 9 km Long run* - 34:58 Wet and windy run. * means I hope that soon this won't be what I'd call a long run
    • Friday - 5 km recover run - 19:57 Tired enough today after doing 3 from 4 days.
    • Saturday - 3.5 km moderate - 13:20 Legs still a little tired so a nippy run out to close the week off. Ran 3 kms at increasing effort [3:57, 3:40, 3:33]. Nice to have the watch to see this info.

    Week total: 32.7 km from 5 days

    At the peak of my training last year I was doing 25-35 km per week so 32.7 km for the first week back is an acceptable starting point for me.


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  • Am I reading this right? Your 5k PB is 18.45 and your 5k recovery run is 19.57.

    My 5k PB (I've done 1 timed 5k!!!) is 17.50 and my 5k recovery run, if I did one, would be 25mins.

    Anyone else think this is strange? Admittedly we're very different types of runners as most of my races are Half or full marathon distance.




  • I was gonna say my the same but was in two minds. If you want to build your aerobic base (which I think absolutely you should) then all your easy and recovery runs should slow down.




  • Thanks guys. Really appreciate the feedback.

    I need to force myself to hold back a bit more alright. I think as I was doing such little weekly mileage overall last year I was getting away with the brisker "recovery" runs but that likely won't continue.

    Today's 5 k recovery run was 20:47 so it's heading in the right direction.




  • I need to force myself to hold back a bit more alright. I think as I was doing such little weekly mileage overall last year I was getting away with the brisker "recovery" runs but that likely won't continue.

    To be honest it's not even about getting away with it. There are physiological adaptations that occur at easy pace that you won't get from running too fast. You could be running 200 miles a week but if all those miles are too fast your aerobic base will still be crap.
    Today's 5 k recovery run today was 20:47 so it's heading in the right direction.

    To give some context a 5k recovery run when my 5k pb was 17.25 would be around 25mins. Closer to 25.30.

    That being said, I know very very little about training for the mile. But I expect a lot of the same principles still apply.




  • It's what I needed to hear. Without sounding unappreciative of what I managed to do in the last year I think at the nub of why I didn't quite hit my final target was not enough slow mileage, which I'm looking to address.

    I'd say you're correct about the same (or very similar) principles applying and it sounds like I've got a bit of reading to do

    image.jpg




  • Itziger wrote: »
    Am I reading this right? Your 5k PB is 18.45 and your 5k recovery run is 19.57.

    My 5k PB (I've done 1 timed 5k!!!) is 17.50 and my 5k recovery run, if I did one, would be 25mins.

    Anyone else think this is strange? Admittedly we're very different types of runners as most of my races are Half or full marathon distance.

    Don’t think it’s strange, because this kind of thing is very common. Definitely wrong though! Today’s 20:47 isn’t much better. You need to totally change your mindset around training runs - know what youre supposed to be achieving from them and executing based on that.




  • I run easy about 27min for 5k but would run 4-6 mile on each run, hr sits 140-150. My recovery would be a minute slower per mile, only do that when I feel beat up, hr 130-140




  • I’d recommend you get hold of Jack Daniels’ ‘Running Formula’ book if you’re looking to read up on this. Good place to start, and possibly all you’ll ever need, certainly enough to get you those few seconds.




  • Murph_D wrote: »
    I’d recommend you get hold of Jack Daniels’ ‘Running Formula’ book if you’re looking to read up on this. Good place to start, and possibly all you’ll ever need, certainly enough to get you those few seconds.

    Thanks Murph. It's on my Kindle now




  • To give you some context from another miler, I've run a 1500m in 4.25 which is equivalent (roughly) to a 4.46 mile. I've also done a 4.52 mile. My recovery pace would be 5 mins-5.20 per k. So about 25 mins to 26.30 mins for that 5k. You would benefit greatly from:

    Running more: 13 minute and 20 minute runs aren't really worth the effort of getting changed! Aim for 30 minutes minimum if you can with a long run of up to 60 mins.

    Running slower: On your easy days, run easy (easy and slow are not the same thing). Doesn't necessarily have to be 5 mins per k but definitely slower than you are currently doing.

    You have good talent for the mile but you are lacking in endurance. To improve this you need to run more and to run more you need to slow down. You will break 5 mins this year easily if you train a little more smartly.

    Best of luck.


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  • pconn062 wrote: »
    To give you some context from another miler, I've run a 1500m in 4.25 which is equivalent (roughly) to a 4.46 mile. I've also done a 4.52 mile. My recovery pace would be 5 mins-5.20 per k. So about 25 mins to 26.30 mins for that 5k. You would benefit greatly from:

    Running more: 13 minute and 20 minute runs aren't really worth the effort of getting changed! Aim for 30 minutes minimum if you can with a long run of up to 60 mins.

    Running slower: On your easy days, run easy (easy and slow are not the same thing). Doesn't necessarily have to be 5 mins per k but definitely slower than you are currently doing.

    You have good talent for the mile but you are lacking in endurance. To improve this you need to run more and to run more you need to slow down. You will break 5 mins this year easily if you train a little more smartly.

    Best of luck.

    This is it exactly.
    This log is one of the more intresting ones(to me anyway) on boards because it a little science experiment. Id love to see what you would achieve in spring/summer if you got to 40/50 miles per week. Maybe life will not allow this but I really think you could make massive improvements. Either way keep posting, its good to follow. Good luck.




  • Backing up what PConn said (and a little bit of Devil's Advocate thrown in).

    Forget the word 'recovery' - if you're running 20 miles a week, there isn't really anything to recover from! Even if you're running 100 miles, you're not recovering by getting out for 60 minutes the day (or even evening) after a session - you're just trying not to compromise your body's recovery while getting further aerobic stimulus. You would achieve more 'recovery' with a leisurely cycle the next day than a run but you wouldn't get the same aerobic stimulus.

    So, think 'easy' - that's about effort. Easy pace appears to be highly individualised.

    There's a guy in our club who runs around 80-90mpw and happily does most of his mileage at above 8:30 or even 9min/mile pace. He has a very good chance of running sub-15 for 5k this year. I've seen others running 80-90 mpw who barely go over 7min/mile. I've heard of other people who had success by significantly upping the pace on their easy days.

    Mine is generally over 8min/miles - Daniels would have me running 7min easy days - and I think everyone commenting on DG's easy pace is probably around the same, despite the wide range in our 5k PBs!

    If the most important thing in your week is your session, then you want to run a pace/volume that doesn't compromise the quality of your session. If your target is building mileage, then you have to accept that training/races may suffer a little while you get used to it.

    As PConn says, you don't need more slow mileage - you probably just need more mileage. When you're not running huge mileage, the pace often comes to you. When I started running, every run was a progression run because I was only running 3-4 days a week. When I run 50miles a week, I can't run faster than 8min/miles on easy days.

    The main sign you need to look out for is that you're flagging (or working at all) at the end of an easy run. And, apart from that, you have to learn what works for you. That could be faster than Daniels or any of us suggest. It might be two minutes slower. I could show you two people with the exact same pbs who have done very different things to achieve them - you have to figure out yourself what will get you the best return.

    But the answer is not always more mileage (you can run a good mile off 30-40 miles).

    And I'd like to speak up for very short runs. Personally, getting out for 20 minutes helps me. Instead of binning a day, I get an extra 2.5 miles in and I'm more likely to turn a 20 minute run into 25-30 minutes than I am to from zero to 30.

    Lastly, if you're still working off mapmyrun and a stopwatch to work out distances and paces, then there's a very good chance that the paces/distances above are indicative so you'll get a better handle on them once your GPS watch is up and running.




  • Sacksian wrote: »
    If the most important thing in your week is your session, then you want to run a pace/volume that doesn't compromise the quality of your session. If your target is building mileage, then you have to accept that training/races may suffer a little while you get used to it.

    The sessions were definitely the most important for me up to now.

    I think I was doing enough sessions once I was focused on the running at the end of last year at two sessions per week. Each week I typed up the log with my long run at 9km or 10km, and always as I was typing I'd have the thought "who am I kidding". That said, these were usually run at under 4 min/km pace.

    Itziger's feedback last night was well timed indeed, as my planned long run today of 14 km was done in 4:55 /km pace which I found very comfortable and it's a record long run for me.

    I'll be listening to the body as best I can and it will be between 1 or 2 sessions per week for now depending on how I'm feeling. I'll accept it if the session quality falls back a little for a while as I get used to higher mileage.
    Sacksian wrote: »
    But the answer is not always more mileage (you can run a good mile off 30-40 miles).

    There's the hope. I'll be delighted if I manage to get to that level and, most importantly, maintain it.

    Thanks again for the input folks. I've started into JDs book as well.




  • There's the hope. I'll be delighted if I manage to get to that level and, most importantly, maintain it.

    Thanks again for the input folks. I've started into JDs book as well.

    Another perspective here and good overviews for milers worth a read.

    https://img.runningwarehouse.com/pdf/middle_distance_guide.pdf

    It's high mileage but you can take alot from it and how to structure your training and pace intensity etc




  • First 30 mile week. First ever 6 day week too.

    I'm finding it's the handiest if I can manage to get out in the middle of the day from the office onto the country roads round work. Otherwise it's between 8 and 10 pm at night when I get out. Maybe someday I'll master the willpower for a pre-work morning run. I've a lot of respect for anyone that manages it.


    Week 02

    Monday - 5 x 1k @ 5k pace w/ 1k recovery. [3:33, 4:39], [3:45, 4:52], [3:41, 4:40], [3:33, 5:13], [3:23 5:42]I'm not 100% sure of what my 5k pace is exactly but know it should be less than my current PB suggests, so I took a stab at sub 18, seeing as that's one of my goals for the year. So target was 3:35/km. Setting off from the office, it felt like all the recoveries were on a gentle downslope with the 1k efforts had more of an upslope, apart from the last one. The second 1k was ropey, into a headwind and I was wondering if I'd made a mistake with my plan but steadied the ship after that as my recovery kms slowed down. A bit of a bastardised workout I know as I was trying to put a bit of effort in while upping my mileage. The paces were definitely a bit all over the place though. Partly down to the inconsistent terrain and me not giving myself a proper recovery in between. I'm not sure if I'll attempt this type of session on that route again although (says he) it did the job with 11 km covered and some effort thrown into the mix. Dare I say I kind of enjoyed it also.

    Tuesday - 5 k recovery run - 20:47. I updated my log on boards after this run and now realise that this needs to be much slower.

    Wednesday - 14 km long run at 4:55/km - 01:08:XX I figured since a GAA match lasts just over the hour I'd manage a hour long run without needing to ramp more slowly to that duration. Once the the legs were up to it of course. I had decided on 14 km in around the hour was what I'd do. Thanks to the intervention on the log the evening before I had a look at my pacing. I decided 5 min/km would be reasonable and I'd stick with the distance I'd initially planned even if it pushed me past the hour. Pace ended up 4:54/km. A day or two earlier and I could have seen myself trying to break the hour mark for the run. Was finished in 01:08. A hint of a cramp in one hamstring around km 12 but it didn't disrupt my effort level or pace. The entire run was surprisingly comfortable and I took the unusual measure of bringing the phone with me to listen to a podcast which I think helped keep the pace down. More runs like this to come hopefully.

    Thursday - 6.4 km (4 miles) easy - 31:07 Still pushing the mileage. Evening run. The legs felt absolutely fine after the day before. No pain or stiffness anywhere. Calves were a little tight but that's not unusual most days. Went to bed at the usual time afterwards and very strangely I woke naturally at 6 am and my legs and arms were very very heavy so there was the delayed fatigue I was expecting from the day before at last. It was a strange sort of feeling as there was no accompaniment of pain of stiffness. All was good once up and walking around during Friday though.

    Friday - Rest

    Saturday - 10 x 180m Hills [34,34,36,36,34,34,35,34,34,32] w/ 70s jog recovery. After upping the mileage this week, I was a little hesitant about doing a second session but I was feeling sprightly. I'm glad I did as I found these relatively easy without going all out. I would have covered these a half a second to 1 second faster in November for example. Nice mild, dry evening and another 7.6 kms banked too. Wanted to run further for recovery but I was due back home and had to make do with the distance covered for the day.

    Sunday - 4.2 km easy - 19:14.. Slightly unplanned but totting up the weekly total I saw that I was agonisingly close to a 30 mile week, so I had to tip out to clock this up. 4:35 /km pace

    Weekly total: 48 km from 6 days running.




  • Just the one session though due to feeling a little under the weather the last few days but managed to hit 30 miles again at least. Not a full blown cold but I've been dosing myself with the manuka and lemon trying to keep it at bay.


    Week 03

    Monday - 6 x 1k @ 3:35 target pace w/ 2m standing rec [3:40, 3:33, 3:41, 3:40, 3:35, 3:22] (plan was for 5 x 1k initially) Tried to suss out a level enough and marginally uninterrupted stretch of path/cycle path for this. Looking at the GPS data afterwards it turned out there was a 4 m incline over the km which wouldn't be significant if it wasn't accompanied by a strong breeze. I went out in the evening after Storm Brendan had mostly passed. Nice gentle dry breeze as I did my warm up but that didn't last. By the start of my first repeat the sideways rain had set in and the wind had picked up again. I realised that my odd numbered repeats were mostly into the wind and had a slight incline, so after the first rep I decided to do an even number of repeats so that I could finish with a nicer feeling. I was aware the wind was hampering me a little and I found I was looking at the watch too much as a result. This was interfereing with my rhythm as I struggled to run exactly straight a few times. I decided to trust myself more on the last two reps and put the head down trying to check the watch less often. On the last, with the relief of having the hardest reps done, I let myself push a little quicker, definitely slowing towards the end of it.

    Tuesday - Missed recovery run Accompanied my wife for a scan and then back into the office. The day just got away on me.

    Wednesday - 17.4 km easy - 1:20:33. Had picked out a loop that would give me my 10 miles (plus a little more). It's probably a little bit too long to be skipping out of the office at lunch for this so I probably ended up running a little quicker than I should have. Pace turned out to be 4:38/km (7:24/mile). I actually took two phone calls while out and it wasn't hard to chat although I did notice my pace quickened both time I took the calls. Tiring slightly on the very last km, although the pace was still 4:39 for it, so I think the effort level while maybe a little quick wasn't too bad. Nice long run bonus; I had to stop at the Hatchett Inn to use the bathroom in the middle of the run. It was like an oasis amidst the green fields and one off houses. I knew I'd be passing it so had to hang tough for a couple of miles. 10.9 miles looks like it'll be the cap for my long runs for now dues to time constraints. Work is flexible enough so I'm happy to run it again but will it will probably be at a similar pace.

    Thursday - 5 km recovery run - 25:21 - A properly slow recovery run at last. Legs were definitely tired today after yesterdays long run so that helped.

    Friday - 9 km - easy run @ 4:30 pace. This pace feels very comfortable for me. I manually checked my heart rate during the run a couple of times and it was between 158-166. I'll need to see what my maximum heart rate actually is is but going by the guidance I'm into the 80% range here so going by HR guidance it was too fast (again). However if I was going by 70-75% of my estimated 5k pace then it looks like the pacing is okay though. So I'm a little uncertain on what is right here. Feeling very comfortable at the finish with no breathlessness.

    Saturday - Unplanned rest. Missed session Starting to feel the hint of a cold coming on.

    Sunday - 6.4 km - 40 mins A weekend of birthday parties. Myself and the eldest fella were at home so I decided to chance an easy run with him accompanying me on his little bike, giving him a helping push up a couple of hills.

    Weekly total: 48.8 km from 5 days running.

    I haven't ruled out the NIA mile on the 28th yet but we've another scan that day and new furniture due for delivery the same. The kids have karate that evening too. I'll have to perform some serious gymnastics to make it.




  • The cold that was whispering at the end of week 3 was shouting last week. Still not fully clear of it and I probably didn't help myself on Tuesday passed. Pesky thing.


    Week 04

    Monday - Rest

    Tuesday - 4.65 km moderate/hard - 16:54 I didn't want a start/stop session as I wasn't 100% but did want to make up for missing the last couple of sessions by doing something at a moderately hard pace. I was feeling better than I had at the weekend, just a little heavy legged but throat and chest were all good. I resisted the urge to go too hard and didn't look at the watch at all until the end, but the pace was definitely consistent throughout. My breathing was hard at the end though as I tried to maintain the consistent pace. No sprint finish to hit a target time but felt I was probably close to 17 minutes. Turned out to be only a few seconds off my record for this run and sub 17 always gives me a little boost. Incidentally I covered 5 km when I add the start of my cool down to the end of the run in 18:42 according to the watch, so there's no doubting that 18:45 PB should be easily trimmed if I get the chance. Felt good for the afternoon but was fairly shot come bed time.

    Wednesday - Rest No nagging internal monologue today. Easy decision to take a rest today.

    Thursday - 8 km easy - 39 mins. Not a bad week to practice running slow. Heavy breathing and an elevated heart rate were a big no no for the rest of the week as I wasn't going to repeat Tuesday's mistake.

    Friday - 9 km easy - 40 mins.

    Saturday - 11.7 km easy - 57 mins Determined to keep the heart rate and effort down but hopefully still keep some mileage ticking over.

    Weekly total: 34 km from 4 days running.

    There will be no race this week unfortunately and speaking to my wife it will be tricky to go to a race now before the baby comes unless she accompanies me as I'm not comfortable leaving her on her own with the kids at home when I'm more than a 10 minute drive away. She's almost certainly going to go early and we've no family nearby.




  • Week 05

    Monday - 5 x 1k @ 5k pace w/ 1:30 r/ [3:32, 3:34, 3:35, 3:36, 3:18] I thought I had a nice stretch of road for this but the road aligns South West so even without Storm Brendan blowing it looks to be breezy enough drag and the GPS tells me it's an 8 m elevation change over the km. It doesn't feel significant but coupled with the wind it means the outward reps are definitely harder to maintain the pace than the inward reps which are so much easier. So it looks like I need to find an alternative route. I decided I'd only do 5 reps today but shorten the recovery from 2 to 1.5 mins and cheating a little I started out the road so I had the wind at my back for the odd numbered reps. Delighted I actually hit consistent times compared to last time but, as I mentioned, the effort out was definitely harder than back in. So a slight wind assisted 3:18 for my last rep. Not a million miles from the 03:07 I'd need to be hitting for a sub 5 mile. This session seemed to finally clear off the tail of the cold that had me bothered last week.

    Tuesday - Rest Into town for another scan.

    Wednesday - 17.4 km easy - 1:20:30. Very busy day yesterday, with a late night moving furniture around the house once the kids were in bed, including hauling a chunky new wardrobe and drawers up the stairs. NIA was never a runner on Tuesday really. Had fallen into bed the night before so was naturally tired all morning in work before I even set off with the headphones on. The distraction of a podcast wasn't enough to take my mind off how much I wasn't enjoying this run though (the first long run I didn't enjoy). Just get it done was all I was thinking. About 4 k to go hunger set in. I don't think I've ever felt hungry on a run before. Was delighted to tuck into lunch when I got back anyway. I hope this is where the gains are made.

    Thursday - 5 km recovery run - 26 mins Legs still tired from the long run. Hopefully I nailed he recovery pace today. Tried talking to myself a couple of times like a big weirdo to see :D Found my left calf a little tight from around halfway on. Stretching not quite getting the spot so I went over it with the hot water bottle when I got home.

    Friday - 20 x 40s Intrevals w/ 30s jog. Haven't got through JDs book yet but just used a couple of the tables based off my mile time to get a value for VDOT. I only scanned through it so far so not 100% sure even what it means but I picked an Interval target pace of 3:37/km. Hadn't done this workout in a couple of months but I used to run it by feel before and got to 20 reps just once or twice, so I was hopeful I wouldn't gas out and manage the 20 without killing myself now that I had a pace to clip my over-zealousness a little. Even so I still might have run them a little quicker than I should as my pace varied between 3:16 and 3:40 - averaging 3:28 overall. It was very windy though and a bumpy path with a couple of small hills so that was always going to affect the consistency. Felt fine at the end. Walked for a minute before resuming a jog. On my jog home I was totting up my distances and realised I was going to be 3 km short of doing 200 km in January so off I go for a little detour to hit the 200 mark. Sure what else would I be doing on a Friday night...

    Saturday - Rest

    Sunday - 30 minutes easy running - 6.3 km @ average of 4:44 pace. Fridays detour meant hitting 30 miles for the week was easily done with less than 5 km but wanted to run for the half hour so did just over 6.


    Weekly total: 50 km from 5 days running.

    Great to get back to getting 2 sessions in, in the week. Very disappointed I didn't have the time to race on Tuesday gone. Having been sick the week before it, it might have meant I couldn't have hit it as hard as I would have liked but I still would have liked to try. It had been my target from Christmas on, so I'm not 100 % where I'll go to now. It's probably going to have to be a DIY job, preferably on a track.




  • NIA Tuesday past wasnt too bad a one to miss, in the mile race there was only 5 of us, 2 guys and 3 ladies. Was a lonely race!


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  • NIA Tuesday past wasnt too bad a one to miss, in the mile race there was only 5 of us, 2 guys and 3 ladies. Was a lonely race!

    Were you the sub 5er? That might have been all I needed.


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