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What oil for the old girl

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Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 584 ✭✭✭Justjens


    Older pushrod engines need a high ZDDP content, that's why I go for Millers classic 20w/50 changed annually, mainly summer usage.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,487 ✭✭✭Seweryn


    Justjens wrote: »
    Older pushrod engines need a high ZDDP content, that's why I go for Millers classic 20w/50 changed annually, mainly summer usage.
    That BMW engine is not a pushrod type engine ;).

    And oils with low ZDDP are full of other anti wear additives.

    Another interesting oil for this type of engines is this one and I am going to try it out in my Volkswagen at the next oil change.


  • Posts: 7,499 ✭✭✭ [Deleted User]


    I didnt think this would spark such a debate!
    I'm still none the wiser but I won't be servicing it for another few weeks .


  • Registered Users Posts: 64,758 ✭✭✭✭unkel


    I didnt think this would spark such a debate!
    I'm still none the wiser but I won't be servicing it for another few weeks .

    All but one of the contributors to this thread would recommend 20W50 mineral oil for your M10 engine :)


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,487 ✭✭✭Seweryn


    unkel wrote: »
    All but one of the contributors to this thread would recommend 20W50 mineral oil for your M10 engine :)
    I would recommend a 20W50 oil (mineral or not) if we lived in Morocco or Pakistan and it was summer time. This type of oil for winter conditions just means more wear every time you start the engine. But it will work OK.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 9,061 ✭✭✭Kenny Logins


    unkel wrote: »
    All but one of the contributors to this thread would recommend 20W50 mineral oil for your M10 engine :)

    Doesn't make them right. :pac:

    20W50 seems to be pushing it a bit in our climate.

    0xHkPFL.png


  • Registered Users Posts: 64,758 ✭✭✭✭unkel


    Ireland is always the whole year above -10C :)


  • Registered Users Posts: 9,061 ✭✭✭Kenny Logins


    unkel wrote: »
    Ireland is always the whole year above -10C :)

    ...but never (ever) above 33.3c.

    I'd go for 20W40. :pac:

    (I don't have an opinion on this really, just enjoy the occasional contentious oil thread :p )


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,487 ✭✭✭Seweryn


    unkel wrote: »
    Ireland is always the whole year above -10C :)
    That's not really the point. It's like saying that our lanes are 3 m wide so we can all drive trucks to work ;). It's about finding the most optimal solution...


  • Posts: 0 ✭✭✭ [Deleted User]


    I’ve been using Millers NT nanodrive 10W40 for years.
    Great anti friction properties and noise reduction.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 584 ✭✭✭Justjens


    Seweryn wrote: »
    That BMW engine is not a pushrod type engine ;).



    Shows what I know about beemers...:p


  • Registered Users Posts: 64,758 ✭✭✭✭unkel


    Seweryn wrote: »
    That's not really the point. It's like saying that our lanes are 3 m wide so we can all drive trucks to work ;). It's about finding the most optimal solution...

    The advised oil for our climate is 20W50, see the picture from the manual that Kenny Loggins posted.

    At a push, if you changed the oil twice a year for some reason, you could use 10W40 for the winter change

    Is it so hard to admit you got it wrong? :p


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,487 ✭✭✭Seweryn


    unkel wrote: »
    The advised oil for our climate is 20W50, see the picture from the manual that Kenny Loggins posted.

    At a push, if you changed the oil twice a year for some reason, you could use 10W40 for the winter change

    Is it so hard to admit you got it wrong? :p
    As I said a 20W50 will work just fine, but it is not the best choice.

    The manual for the particular car states that 10W30 to be used in the winter (having today's choice it would be a 10W30 or better 0W30 or 5W30).
    In the summer 10W40, 15W40 or 20W50 can be used according to the manual.
    Because we do not have extremely hot summers (not even hot summers), an oil with XW40 viscosity range (0W40, 5W40 or 10W40) would do best job as a single solution all year round.

    Obviously, the key thing is to get the right ACEA rating which is more important than the viscosity range that we all keep arguing about. The oil required should be ACEA A3/B3 or A3/B4 and once this is met we are half way there.

    The main reason I would not chose an oil with viscosity say 20W50 is because it flows much slower at the start up and warming up. Almost all of the engine wear and tear happens during the engine start up. Having as low viscosity oil as possible is beneficial for the engine longevity (while maintaining the right viscosity at working temperatures). Especially when your classic car is used occasionally with plenty of start-stop procedures.


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