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Christmas pudding homemade

  • 04-12-2018 5:08pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 660 ✭✭✭ redmgar


    Hey, anyone make their own this year?
    I think you need to let it mature for at least 4 weeks, this year I made the Nevin Maguire one but substituted chocolate stout instead of Guiness.
    Hoping it works out.


Comments

  • Administrators, Business & Finance Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 16,766 Admin ✭✭✭✭✭ Toots


    That reminds me I really need to get the finger out and make mine this year. Not a hope will I have time for a 4 week maturing, last year my puds were made a few days before Christmas day. :o


  • Moderators Posts: 24,662 ✭✭✭✭ ChewChew


    I always make mine months in advance but this year has got away from me. I am hoping to make them this weekend and I hope to attempt a gluten free one also!!


  • Registered Users Posts: 17,304 ✭✭✭✭ Maryanne84


    I always make mine at Halloween. I make a couple of large ones and one small one to sample, just in case.... I do the same with the cake!


  • Registered Users Posts: 660 ✭✭✭ redmgar


    Any thoughts on lighting them? I heard that you heat whiskey on a spoon with a candle then when it ignites pour onto the pudding.


  • Registered Users Posts: 17,304 ✭✭✭✭ Maryanne84


    redmgar wrote: »
    Any thoughts on lighting them? I heard that you heat whiskey on a spoon with a candle then when it ignites pour onto the pudding.

    Personally, I think that it’s a waste of good whiskey. I prefer it in a coffee topped with cream.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,987 ✭✭✭ CheerLouth


    redmgar wrote: »
    Any thoughts on lighting them? I heard that you heat whiskey on a spoon with a candle then when it ignites pour onto the pudding.

    I like the idea of lighting it, but I'm always afraid I'll burn the house down :o


  • Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators Posts: 26,589 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Posy


    Just pour a tablespoon or so of whiskey over the pudding when it's on a plate, and put a lit match to it. It'll burn for about a minute, and then go out. :)

    I light the pudding every year because I don't eat it, so I like to be involved!


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,380 ✭✭✭ chuckles30


    I do the same as posy.
    I made mine the last weekend in November


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,322 ✭✭✭ Day Lewin


    redmgar wrote: »
    Any thoughts on lighting them? I heard that you heat whiskey on a spoon with a candle then when it ignites pour onto the pudding.

    First stick a holly sprig into the top of the pudding.

    Pour the brandy into a deep spoon, hold over a candle flame until very hot: (Get one of your minions to turn the lights out!)
    Then tilt the spoon sideways to the candle so the booze ignites, and pour the tongues of blue flame directly over your pudden.

    Very spectacular in a dark room.
    As soon as the holly catches fire, blow the flames out, turn lights on, and serve.

    PS As others have said, it is more of a display than a taste experience - the flavour is lost, really, but it is a Christmas ritual.

    In our house, we even have a special spoon (a small gravy ladle) :)


  • Registered Users Posts: 14,452 ✭✭✭✭ Seve OB


    Yes I'm making my own.
    Have it mixed up ready to steam tomorrow.
    But I've nothing to steam it in

    What's everyone's opinion on steaming options before I hit the shops in the morning.

    A plastic bowl

    A delph bowl.

    A dedicated steamer.

    A muslin cloth. Seen reference to calico cloth online. Not sure what the difference is. And would it be the same muslin cloth you would get in mothercare?


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  • Registered Users Posts: 4,322 ✭✭✭ Day Lewin


    Delph bowl, seal top, stand on upturned saucer in your largest saucepan: boiling water all around the bowl and lid of pot lid tightly on.

    Muslin is not the same as calico- it is much lighter and looser weave, water will go in through it.

    The traditional pudding cloth would be calico or strong linen - a large tightly-woven tea towel or thick linen pillowcase might do it.

    They would scald the cloth and shake flour over it to form a kind of crust: tie up pudding in this and boil directly in a pot of water over the fire. [or on the stove]
    It produces the classic ball-shaped pudding: I've never tried this, but I've spoken to many older people who often saw it done.


  • Registered Users Posts: 29,737 ✭✭✭✭ Graces7


    Day Lewin wrote: »
    Delph bowl, seal top, stand on upturned saucer in your largest saucepan: boiling water all around the bowl and lid of pot lid tightly on.

    Muslin is not the same as calico- it is much lighter and looser weave, water will go in through it.

    The traditional pudding cloth would be calico or strong linen - a large tightly-woven tea towel or thick linen pillowcase might do it.

    They would scald the cloth and shake flour over it to form a kind of crust: tie up pudding in this and boil directly in a pot of water over the fire. [or on the stove]
    It produces the classic ball-shaped pudding: I've never tried this, but I've spoken to many older people who often saw it done.

    Like the famous "clootie dumpling" we made in Orkney

    see

    http://www.eday.orkney.sch.uk/newsletter/june2000/dumpling.htm

    You had to be careful lest you end up with fruity soup... I prefer this to the heavier Christmas pudding


  • Registered Users Posts: 14,452 ✭✭✭✭ Seve OB


    Bought that calico cloth this morning.
    Very helpful lady in Micheal Guineys.
    Boiling away as we speak. I'm just not sure I put enough flour on the cloth........ But to late to worry about that now!

    Also picked up a steamer bowl in arnotts. It's just a metal bowl with loose enough fitting lid.

    Have one of them going away now also.

    Will be interesting to see if there is much difference.


    So the lady in Michael Guineys was on about a turkey cloth. A light enough muslin. Got a bit of that and going to try it out this year. You melt butter and soak the cloth in it and wrap the turkey up. Supposed to keep it moist. I usually brine my turkey so will be doing that anyway, might just add a bit more flavor to it.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 9,769 ✭✭✭ my3cents


    Seve OB wrote: »
    Yes I'm making my own.
    Have it mixed up ready to steam tomorrow.
    But I've nothing to steam it in

    What's everyone's opinion on steaming options before I hit the shops in the morning.

    A plastic bowl

    A delph bowl.

    A dedicated steamer.

    A muslin cloth. Seen reference to calico cloth online. Not sure what the difference is. And would it be the same muslin cloth you would get in mothercare?

    If you ever come across an antique Grimwades Quick Cooker cheap enough then I'd recommend one https://www.ebay.ie/sch/i.html?_blrs=spell_check&_nkw=grimwades+quick+cooker

    They come in it at least half a dozen sizes, my parents used to collect them and they have 6 or 7 and I don't think they have a full set. There was also another company that copied them a few years ago they went bust but there version says iirc The Edwardian Cooking co or something similar on the front.

    Anyway the collection started with my grandmothers one which was a family heirloom. My grandmother used to use one to make a Christmas pudding every year and it was good, think she always started some time in August though.


  • Registered Users Posts: 244 ✭✭ freida


    Did it in the slow cooker. Hassle free.


  • Registered Users Posts: 14,452 ✭✭✭✭ Seve OB


    Think the pudding in the cloth is not the way to do it.
    It didn’t really bond and 6 hours on the boil didn’t even seem to be cooked. Felt very squishy.
    Maybe water got into it.

    I left it hang for a few days and turned it out. Was as it felt.

    I wrapped it up again, cooked it for 4 hours. It’s hanging now and will stay there for a good few weeks/months.

    The one in the steamer seems to be bang on. Well have that Christmas Day.


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