Advertisement
If you have a new account but are having problems posting or verifying your account, please email us on hello@boards.ie for help. Thanks :)
Hello all! Please ensure that you are posting a new thread or question in the appropriate forum. The Feedback forum is overwhelmed with questions that are having to be moved elsewhere. If you need help to verify your account contact hello@boards.ie

Bringing Children To Games

Options
124

Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 4,889 ✭✭✭Third_Echelon


    ProudDUB wrote: »
    Because the child is 4 months old and will spend the game strapped to her body. He does not require his own seat. Why should she buy a ticket for a seat for a child, when he does not need need one and has zero ability to actually sit in it?

    Most one year olds are perfectly capable of sitting in a seat by the age of one, yet airlines still allow kids to go free up to the age of 2, as do the Aviva stadium. It boggles the mind that anyone would have a problem with a similar system being in place in Croke Park.

    Exactly. It's common practice in many areas where kids under 2 are considered as sitting on their parent's lap and don't require a ticket. Charging 80 quid for it is a joke when there was no charge previously.

    Most NFL teams in the states (arguably the most $ greedy org on the planet) allow lap kids in for free in the majority of stadiums.

    I brought my own son to a 55,000 seater MLS game a few months ago at Stanford Stadium near San Francisco and he was 3 & 1/2 months old. Sat on my knee or with my wife in the baby sling thing. Baby bag with all we needed slotted under our seat just fine. Set of ear defenders on him and he was grand. Left near the end just to beat traffic, but he wasn't traumatised or anything by it :)

    I wouldn't judge anyone for wanting to bring a young kid to a game like that. As long as they are adequately prepared then fine.

    Charging a full price ticket is a complete joke!


  • Registered Users Posts: 15,094 ✭✭✭✭Fr Tod Umptious


    Exactly. It's common practice in many areas where kids under 2 are considered as sitting on their parent's lap and don't require a ticket. Charging 80 quid for it is a joke when there was no charge previously.

    Most NFL teams in the states (arguably the most $ greedy org on the planet) allow lap kids in for free in the majority of stadiums.

    I brought my own son to a 55,000 seater MLS game a few months ago at Stanford Stadium near San Francisco and he was 3 & 1/2 months old. Sat on my knee or with my wife in the baby sling thing. Baby bag with all we needed slotted under our seat just fine. Set of ear defenders on him and he was grand. Left near the end just to beat traffic, but he wasn't traumatised or anything by it :)

    I wouldn't judge anyone for wanting to bring a young kid to a game like that. As long as they are adequately prepared then fine.

    Charging a full price ticket is a complete joke!

    Would the NFL allow kids on laps for free to a Superbowl ?

    Because that's what the comparison should be here, not some MLS game.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 8,723 ✭✭✭nice_guy80


    Kids don't have a right to go to a game
    Would there be a discounted ticket for the Champions League final?


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,540 ✭✭✭flasher0030


    Would the NFL allow kids on laps for free to a Superbowl ?

    Because that's what the comparison should be here, not some MLS game.

    Nail on the head!! This is the showcase event of the year for the GAA. Stadium packed. It’s not safe for a youngster. If the child was even over the age of 1, it would have some resistance to the odd bang. But if a 4 month old baby got an elbow to the head in the midst of the celebrations when Tyrone get a last minute goal to beat the Dubs, it could have severe consequences. Or if it rains, and the child gets pneumonia. Or develops hearing issues. Where are the parents going to turn to then. Remember, Ireland is the compensation culture.

    Parents know that when you have kids, it restricts many social outings in their lives. I have a couple of kids. And at first it was a bit frustrating, but you get to just accept these things in time, without an element of “Oh God, I wish I could go. It’s not fair”. It might be the case that it’s their first kid, and up to now had the freedom of the world. Like I said, it takes a while to accept that life will never be the same, but after a few incidences like this, the realisation will hit home. But at the end of the day, you can’t underestimate the joy of having kids. And the need to attend All-Ireland finals pales in significance in comparison to the safety of the child. A 4 month old is just too young. Hasn’t the proper neck strength to stay upright for long lengths, and shouldn’t be just left in a sling type device for that long.

    The parents need a wake up call.


  • Registered Users Posts: 15,094 ✭✭✭✭Fr Tod Umptious


    nice_guy80 wrote: »
    Kids don't have a right to go to a game
    Would there be a discounted ticket for the Champions League final?

    Exactly
    In Croke Park or anywhere else during the championship a U-16 ticket is usually €5, for league games in spring they are free.
    But in no sport in the world will you get a discount for the championship game.


  • Advertisement
  • Registered Users Posts: 1,049 ✭✭✭Dannyriver


    jluv wrote: »
    Charging 80 euro for a ticket for the baby is not going to change the H&S aspect of this. One vacant seat is not going to change noise levels or any other risk posed to the child.I personally would not bring my infant child to a game like that.
    My reading of it is that the GAA will overlook H&S for 80 euro? Put an age limit on tickets with an explanation as to why.Maybe insurance won't cover it?
    But when I see the GAA charge 80 euro for all young hurling and football supporters,who play the game every week,go to all league and championship games,the future of the game,then I see it as money means more than "customer loyalty" as such. I would be ok with 50 euro for an under 16. These kids are helping to keep the GAA alive.
    With regard to this case,I don't think the child should be there. But if the mother/parent is going to bring them then don't think it's justified to charge 80 euro for a seat that will never be used.

    But insurance will cover it because it s NOT a big risk, people on here seem to be implying that the woman is foolhardy and reckless to want her child to say in years to come that they were at the all ireland final where Tyrone beat Dublin.


  • Registered Users Posts: 9,420 ✭✭✭splinter65


    Keano wrote: »
    Sure why is she allowed out of the house in the first place. Husband should be fined for letting her out.

    Are you mad? Nobody “lets” anyone “out” now?!? Where is there any mention of a “husband” anyway? This is 2018 not 1948.
    Babies of 16 weeks don’t belong in a big very noisy and boisterous crowd for 3 hours at all, especially open air, and this baby doesn’t need to go to this function.
    The only important thing here is the welfare of the child, the parents wishes as always should be secondary.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,089 ✭✭✭andrew1977


    Exactly
    In Croke Park or anywhere else during the championship a U-16 ticket is usually €5, for league games in spring they are free.
    But in no sport in the world will you get a discount for the championship game.

    The English FA do some concessionary ticket prices for the FA cup final each year.Prices are still high for the final , but they do allow a certain amount of tickets at a reduced rate for pensioners/children.


  • Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 4,140 Mod ✭✭✭✭bruschi


    andrew1977 wrote: »
    The English FA do some concessionary ticket prices for the FA cup final each year.Prices are still high for the final , but they do allow a certain amount of tickets at a reduced rate for pensioners/children.

    the ticket prices in the FA cup final ranged from £45 to £145. The average price being over £100. The average price for the FA semi finals is £60. Limited concessions get anywhere from £10 to £25 off for children and OAPs. considering that most children get charged €5 entry up to the final, then it works out overall far cheaper. So its the best of both worlds, every county benefits from cheap entrance for kids for all games up to the final. the final is the only time where they pay full price. The GAA could change this and start increasing family tickets or childrens prices for other games, but they dont. so overall, a person bringing their child to the games works out well even allowing for adding in the expense of the final.

    It may not be the most ideal situation, but to be honest, if they were to give reduced rates for the final but to change prior policy up to that and have reduced rates rather than a set €5 rate, they would actually make more money.


  • Registered Users Posts: 11,569 ✭✭✭✭ProudDUB


    Nail on the head!! This is the showcase event of the year for the GAA. Stadium packed. It’s not safe for a youngster. If the child was even over the age of 1, it would have some resistance to the odd bang. But if a 4 month old baby got an elbow to the head in the midst of the celebrations when Tyrone get a last minute goal to beat the Dubs, it could have severe consequences. Or if it rains, and the child gets pneumonia. Or develops hearing issues. Where are the parents going to turn to then. Remember, Ireland is the compensation culture.

    Parents know that when you have kids, it restricts many social outings in their lives. I have a couple of kids. And at first it was a bit frustrating, but you get to just accept these things in time, without an element of “Oh God, I wish I could go. It’s not fair”. It might be the case that it’s their first kid, and up to now had the freedom of the world. Like I said, it takes a while to accept that life will never be the same, but after a few incidences like this, the realisation will hit home. But at the end of the day, you can’t underestimate the joy of having kids. And the need to attend All-Ireland finals pales in significance in comparison to the safety of the child. A 4 month old is just too young. Hasn’t the proper neck strength to stay upright for long lengths, and shouldn’t be just left in a sling type device for that long.

    The parents need a wake up call.

    That long? It is a 70 minute match, with a 15 minute break the middle. What about parents who take their children on 14 hour long haul flights to Australia? By your ridiculous logic, they shouldn't be allowed enter the airport, never mind get on the plane.


  • Advertisement
  • Registered Users Posts: 2,540 ✭✭✭flasher0030


    ProudDUB wrote: »
    That long? It is a 70 minute match, with a 15 minute break the middle. What about parents who take their children on 14 hour long haul flights to Australia? By your ridiculous logic, they shouldn't be allowed enter the airport, never mind get on the plane.

    I don't know anybody that has brought a 4 month old baby to Australia. Children. Sure. Nothing wrong with that. But a baby who is in the development process. No.

    So the baby will probably be in a car seat for hours coming from Tyrone, then straight into a sling carrier, and into a noisy crowded environment for a couple of more hours. Then back in the car seat again, and back to Tyrone. Obviously you have never researched the time limits and drawbacks of using these accessories. Glad I didn't have you as a parent :eek:


  • Registered Users Posts: 15,094 ✭✭✭✭Fr Tod Umptious


    I don't know anybody that has brought a 4 month old baby to Australia. Children. Sure. Nothing wrong with that. But a baby who is in the development process. No.

    So the baby will probably be in a car seat for hours coming from Tyrone, then straight into a sling carrier, and into a noisy crowded environment for a couple of more hours. Then back in the car seat again, and back to Tyrone. Obviously you have never researched the time limits and drawbacks of using these accessories. Glad I didn't have you as a parent :eek:

    There is nothing particularly concerning about bringing a baby to an event like an All Ireland final.

    As I said back in the day we brought a 6 month old one time and a 3 month old a few years later, they both got on fine.

    But don't expect to do it for free or at a discount price, and as I said it happens every few years when you hear about a story like this.

    The rules are that everyone through the turnstiles needs a ticket, then get a f**kin ticket.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,845 ✭✭✭Hidalgo


    Would the NFL allow kids on laps for free to a Superbowl ?

    Because that's what the comparison should be here, not some MLS game.

    And would the equivalent of €80 get you a Superbowl ticket? Would it f*ck


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,889 ✭✭✭Third_Echelon


    Would the NFL allow kids on laps for free to a Superbowl ?

    Because that's what the comparison should be here, not some MLS game.

    MLS uses 'NFL Entry policy' at their stadiums >>> http://www.nfl.com/news/story/0ap3000000935604/article/nfl-clear-bag-policy

    https://gostanford.com/news/2016/7/11/all-clear.aspx

    It's like a government/TSA approved set of rules, so pretty much all leagues and arenas use this now or their adopted version.

    As mentioned, the particular game I was at was at a college american football stadium with a larger capacity than Aviva Stadium for example, so we're not talking some small gathering here.

    The entry rules that are used there are also the 'NFL Entry Rules' with regards to what you can bring into the stadium and baby polices etc. This means, no backpacks, only a clear plastic bag (all teams sell them). There are bag lockers outside the stadium if you forget or do not know about the rule. Baby bags are OK to bring in as they are searched thoroughly.

    With regards to the Super Bowl I have seen conflicting reports on baby entry for free, so again i suppose this comes down to the stadium hosting the event and their policy (most allow those under 2 or 3 in for free sitting on parents lap).

    This is from the 2016 Superbowl that was in Levi's Stadium near San Francisco: https://www.cbssports.com/nfl/news/look-2k-super-bowl-ticket-for-baby-pays-off-adorably-for-britton-colquitt/

    They were told they needed one, then in the end they didn't.

    I don't know anybody that has brought a 4 month old baby to Australia. Children. Sure. Nothing wrong with that. But a baby who is in the development process. No.

    There have been plenty of this age and it happens day in day out. I have been on plenty of 10 or 11 hours legs of a flight and seen babies of all ages. Parents usually get those bassinet seats at the bulk heads for this purpose.
    So the baby will probably be in a car seat for hours coming from Tyrone, then straight into a sling carrier, and into a noisy crowded environment for a couple of more hours. Then back in the car seat again, and back to Tyrone. Obviously you have never researched the time limits and drawbacks of using these accessories. Glad I didn't have you as a parent :eek:

    I would imagine that they would stay overnight somewhere. As you mention your plan above would be difficult, so I don't think a parent would do that.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,889 ✭✭✭Third_Echelon


    Hidalgo wrote: »
    And would the equivalent of €80 get you a Superbowl ticket? Would it f*ck

    NFL is a multi billion dollar organisation in a country of 320 million people and a worldwide audience.

    GAA is an amateur organisation with a limited audience in a country of 5 or 6 million.

    Apples vs Oranges.


  • Registered Users Posts: 11,569 ✭✭✭✭ProudDUB


    I don't know anybody that has brought a 4 month old baby to Australia. Children. Sure. Nothing wrong with that. But a baby who is in the development process. No.

    So the baby will probably be in a car seat for hours coming from Tyrone, then straight into a sling carrier, and into a noisy crowded environment for a couple of more hours. Then back in the car seat again, and back to Tyrone. Obviously you have never researched the time limits and drawbacks of using these accessories. Glad I didn't have you as a parent :eek:

    Lord above. Such silliness.

    Go on then Dr Flasher. Throw up a photo of your medical degree, or post scientific data from a credible source that proves bringing a baby on a long haul flight is seriously injurious to their health and safety. Then show me one airline, or government or aviation authority that bans young children on planes as a result of the health risk.

    Go on then.

    I'll wait.

    Honestly, Wicklow - never mind Mayo - will win an All Ireland, long before you'll be able to do so.


  • Registered Users Posts: 59 ✭✭comment


    At the Rugby World Cup in Cardiff in 2015 you could get “babes in arms tickets” for free for under 2s. Surely this is a comparable event? You needed the ticket for entry and health & safety purposes. I’m not impressed by all the judgment in this thread. What’s with all the parenting bashing. This debate is about charging under 2s who don’t require a seat.


  • Registered Users Posts: 11,569 ✭✭✭✭ProudDUB


    comment wrote: »
    At the Rugby World Cup in Cardiff in 2015 you could get “babes in arms tickets” for free for under 2s. Surely this is a comparable event? You needed the ticket for entry and health & safety purposes. I’m not impressed by all the judgment in this thread. What’s with all the parenting bashing. This debate is about charging under 2s who don’t require a seat.

    Finally !


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,580 ✭✭✭cms88


    ProudDUB wrote: »
    Finally !

    So you cry when people dont agree with you and shoot down everything they have to say, but dont question when someone does agree


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,580 ✭✭✭cms88


    comment wrote: »
    At the Rugby World Cup in Cardiff in 2015 you could get “babes in arms tickets” for free for under 2s. Surely this is a comparable event? You needed the ticket for entry and health & safety purposes. I’m not impressed by all the judgment in this thread. What’s with all the parenting bashing. This debate is about charging under 2s who don’t require a seat.

    People have already shown they had to pay to bring children under 2 into an All-Ireland final. I'll ask again why do this women think she should be treated any different?


  • Advertisement
  • Registered Users Posts: 59 ✭✭comment


    Presumably she highlighted the issue to hopefully bring about a policy change. I don’t think she’s looking for special treatment. If the GAA review and change the policy everyone in her position benefits.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,580 ✭✭✭cms88


    ProudDUB wrote: »
    That long? It is a 70 minute match, with a 15 minute break the middle. What about parents who take their children on 14 hour long haul flights to Australia? By your ridiculous logic, they shouldn't be allowed enter the airport, never mind get on the plane.

    How are they going to get to and from the game? Teleport?


  • Registered Users Posts: 15,094 ✭✭✭✭Fr Tod Umptious


    comment wrote: »
    Presumably she highlighted the issue to hopefully bring about a policy change. I don’t think she’s looking for special treatment. If the GAA review and change the policy everyone in her position benefits.


    Well this is it.

    It happens almost every year where there is a story of someone and the fact that a baby needs a ticket.

    No sign of a policy change though.


  • Registered Users Posts: 15,094 ✭✭✭✭Fr Tod Umptious


    comment wrote: »
    At the Rugby World Cup in Cardiff in 2015 you could get “babes in arms tickets” for free for under 2s. Surely this is a comparable event? You needed the ticket for entry and health & safety purposes. I’m not impressed by all the judgment in this thread. What’s with all the parenting bashing. This debate is about charging under 2s who don’t require a seat.

    I totally agree.

    Good parents know what they are doing when they bring a baby anywhere, be that to a game or Australia.

    Kids are the ultimate life changer, but that should not restrict parents from doing the things they used to do.


  • Registered Users Posts: 11,569 ✭✭✭✭ProudDUB


    cms88 wrote: »
    How are they going to get to and from the game? Teleport?

    By car, I'd imagine. With the child presumably strapped safely into an ergonomically designed, government approved car seat. Do you want to ban small children from long car journies now too? :confused:


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 8,723 ✭✭✭nice_guy80


    There's plenty of other games to bring a young child to


  • Registered Users Posts: 15,094 ✭✭✭✭Fr Tod Umptious


    OK here is a trick that I have heard works.

    Get a stand and a terrace ticket.
    One for you, one for the baby

    Go to the stand entrance and present both.

    The terrace ticket will not scan at that entrance, but the guys on the gate are usually common sense guys and will scan it/let you through.

    There you and baby are in for e120 instead of e160


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,580 ✭✭✭cms88


    ProudDUB wrote: »
    By car, I'd imagine. With the child presumably strapped safely into an ergonomically designed, government approved car seat. Do you want to ban small children from long car journies now too? :confused:

    Well you said they'd only be there for the 70 mins of the match did you not?


  • Registered Users Posts: 11,569 ✭✭✭✭ProudDUB


    cms88 wrote: »
    Well you said they'd only be there for the 70 mins of the match did you not?

    Strapped to the mothers chest, yes. I didn't bring up how they travel to Croke Park or Dublin at all. Some people seem to think that is relevant. Lord knows why.

    And as to the 70 minutes, there are no time locks on baby slings or harnesses, that I am aware of. She is not forced to keep the child strapped into it for the entire match. The child protection services are hardly likely to come after her, if she takes a tiny baby out of the harness and rocks him in her arms, or hands him over to his father for a cuddle, or does something mad altogether, like putting him up on her shoulder to let him have a look around at all the beer swillling, vicious thugs, who will be stabbing his entire family to death at some stage before the final whistle. That can all be done perfectly easily, without needing another seat, or disturbing any of the aforementioned beer swilling thugs sitting beside her family. :rolleyes:


  • Advertisement
  • Registered Users Posts: 1,580 ✭✭✭cms88


    ProudDUB wrote: »
    Strapped to the mothers chest, yes. I didn't bring up how they travel to Croke Park or Dublin at all. Some people seem to think that is relevant. Lord knows why.

    And as to the 70 minutes, there are no time locks on baby slings or harnesses, that I am aware of. She is not forced to keep the child strapped into it for the entire match. The child protection services are hardly likely to come after her, if takes the child out of the harness and rocks him in her arms, or hands him over to his father for a cuddle, or does something mad altogether, like putting him up on her shoulder to let him have a look around at all the beer swillling thugs, who will be stabbing his entire family to death at some stage before the final whistle. That can all be done perfectly easily, without needing another seat or disturbing any of the aforementioned beer swilling thugs sitting beside her family. :rolleyes:

    Shes not being forced to bring the child to the match either as much as you and others seem to think she is.

    Whats funny about this is you saying how nothing will happen etc, and more than likely nothing will, but if something were to happen you'd most likely be one of the first to come out and blame the GAA for it


Advertisement