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Civil on the job training.

  • 16-04-2018 9:58am
    #1
    Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 16,141 Mod ✭✭✭✭Manic Moran


    Articles like this got me wondering...
    https://www.wsj.com/articles/navy-medics-get-prepared-for-combatwith-tour-of-duty-in-chicago-1521028800

    I would presume that the same issue can happen with any military. It’s not like medics in the DF get a lot of real blood and gore before they actually go overseas and have to do it themselves, often without experienced supervision. Although the US partnership usually emphasizes gun shot victims, it seems to me that there is plenty enough to shock the uninitiated in a lot of road traffic accidents, workplace accidents, and the like, of which I am sure there are plenty in Ireland. Plus, a lot of the injuries and fatalities in Irish deployments have been due to things like RTAs.

    Has there been any suggestion given to putting DF medics or other applicable personnel (do test get deployed?) on attachment to the fire brigade or ambulance services, or doctors to trauma centers in Ireland? Seems to be a win-win. Live training for the DF, and increased manning for the hospitals and emergency services.


Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 3,487 ✭✭✭roadmaster


    Articles like this got me wondering...
    https://www.wsj.com/articles/navy-medics-get-prepared-for-combatwith-tour-of-duty-in-chicago-1521028800

    I would presume that the same issue can happen with any military. It’s not like medics in the DF get a lot of real blood and gore before they actually go overseas and have to do it themselves, often without experienced supervision. Although the US partnership usually emphasizes gun shot victims, it seems to me that there is plenty enough to shock the uninitiated in a lot of road traffic accidents, workplace accidents, and the like, of which I am sure there are plenty in Ireland. Plus, a lot of the injuries and fatalities in Irish deployments have been due to things like RTAs.

    Has there been any suggestion given to putting DF medics or other applicable personnel (do test get deployed?) on attachment to the fire brigade or ambulance services, or doctors to trauma centers in Ireland? Seems to be a win-win. Live training for the DF, and increased manning for the hospitals and emergency services.

    I seen only a few weeks ago on twitter Defence forces medics out working with DFB paramedics


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 5,460 ✭✭✭Barry Badrinath


    roadmaster wrote: »
    I seen only a few weeks ago on twitter Defence forces medics out working with DFB paramedics

    Correct.

    DF medics routinely do ambulance shifts with DFB and the HSE, responding to all types of incidents. Some take leave of absence to upskill in various emergency responder outfits.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 24,878 ✭✭✭✭ Aden Rapping University


    Articles like this got me wondering...
    https://www.wsj.com/articles/navy-medics-get-prepared-for-combatwith-tour-of-duty-in-chicago-1521028800

    I would presume that the same issue can happen with any military. It’s not like medics in the DF get a lot of real blood and gore before they actually go overseas and have to do it themselves, often without experienced supervision. Although the US partnership usually emphasizes gun shot victims, it seems to me that there is plenty enough to shock the uninitiated in a lot of road traffic accidents, workplace accidents, and the like, of which I am sure there are plenty in Ireland. Plus, a lot of the injuries and fatalities in Irish deployments have been due to things like RTAs.

    Has there been any suggestion given to putting DF medics or other applicable personnel (do test get deployed?) on attachment to the fire brigade or ambulance services, or doctors to trauma centers in Ireland? Seems to be a win-win. Live training for the DF, and increased manning for the hospitals and emergency services.

    Medics on various courses are attached to Dublin Fire Brigade (I imagine Cork etc its the same).

    They're pretty well experienced by the time they're going oversea's. Then depending on the mission they'd get more experience on the ground there, plus they cross train with other contingents on the mission.

    Apart from EMT's I think most patrols also have Advanced Paramedics (AP), and at least in Africa they'd also have doctor (but I think I'd trust the EMT & AP's before the Doc).


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 24,878 ✭✭✭✭ Aden Rapping University


    Correct.

    DF medics routinely do ambulance shifts with DFB and the HSE, responding to all types of incidents. .

    Tbh apart from medic's on course's I've never heard of a medic routinely being deployed with DFB or the HSE. And even when they're on their placement they're always under the supervision of an AP.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 5,460 ✭✭✭Barry Badrinath


    Tbh apart from medic's on course's I've never heard of a medic routinely being deployed with DFB or the HSE. And even when they're on their placement they're always under the supervision of an AP.

    I should have caveated that Im only aware of Paramedic guys having worked with DFB and HSE....not bog standard medics.

    Maybe I took it up wrong but on the MFR cse the medic instructors were telling war stories of their time on shifts with DFB & HSE. That also continued well after they were qualified as Paramedics.

    Maybe they did it as part of an advanced paramedic course or refresher training though.


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 24,878 ✭✭✭✭ Aden Rapping University


    I should have caveated that Im only aware of Paramedic guys having worked with DFB and HSE....not bog standard medics.

    Maybe I took it up wrong but on the MFR cse the medic instructors were telling war stories of their time on shifts with DFB & HSE. That also continued well after they were qualified as Paramedics.

    Maybe they did it as part of an advanced paramedic course or refresher training though.

    Yea they do it as part of their training like EMT, AP and ambulance skills courses.

    I'm not in the medical core so I can't be 100% sure, but my brother is an AP in the NAS and he often asked do I know 'Pte or Cpl [insert name]', because he'd have them as students.

    **edit.. If memory serves me right, now that I think of it I think a newly qualified EMT or AP is attached to DFB or the NAS for 12 months. So we might both be right and meeting in the middle.

    The fire station in the DFTC used to cover the local towns and roads around Kildare, can't remember why it was taken off.

    Unrelated but I'd like to mention one of the lads, Sgt Jack Whelan was killed in 1996 travelling to a hoax house fire call. I served oversea's with the 63rd Bn UNIFIL with Jack.. May he Rest in Peace.


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