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Miriam for President?

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  • Registered Users Posts: 29,071 ✭✭✭✭Wanderer78


    Red_Wake wrote:
    He's very highly regarded abroad as well. Would be an excellent face for Ireland, despite what people say.


    I'm sorry folks, but Enda and co didn't actually 'recover' the country, in many aspects, we re actually in very serious trouble, this is evident in critical elements such as housing and our health care system, these elements are critical for a properly functioning society, they are foundations, and they're crumbling. Even though I'm sure the chap is nice, and could very well be a very good president, we need to seriously ask ourselves, are we truly in a 'recovery'!


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 152 ✭✭Thomas__.


    Wanderer78 wrote: »
    Red_Wake wrote:
    He's very highly regarded abroad as well. Would be an excellent face for Ireland, despite what people say.


    I'm sorry folks, but Enda and co didn't actually 'recover' the country, in many aspects, we re actually in very serious trouble, this is evident in critical elements such as housing and our health care system, these elements are critical for a properly functioning society, they are foundations, and they're crumbling. Even though I'm sure the chap is nice, and could very well be a very good president, we need to seriously ask ourselves, are we truly in a 'recovery'!

    Sure there is more to it than the failures of the government and I mean those responsible for the housing problems in the first place which I assume is more based on greed than any other thing the govt could solve, apart from providing more social housing which also takes time and demands money. I am not objecting your analysis, I'm just pointing out where the other responsibilities are.


  • Registered Users Posts: 21,525 ✭✭✭✭Tell me how


    Wanderer78 wrote:
    I'm sorry folks, but Enda and co didn't actually 'recover' the country, in many aspects, we re actually in very serious trouble, this is evident in critical elements such as housing and our health care system, these elements are critical for a properly functioning society, they are foundations, and they're crumbling. Even though I'm sure the chap is nice, and could very well be a very good president, we need to seriously ask ourselves, are we truly in a 'recovery'!

    I don't think there's any doubt but that we are, when considered by the same metrics that assessed the Celtic tiger and economies worldwide, tax revenue, GDP, number of people in work etc.

    Absolutely there are issues with housing but less than 10 years ago we were left with housing estates that no-one would move in to and even now, there's several empty properties in cities with housing problems. I'm not saying there aren't issues, just pointing out that it is complex and influenced by elements outside of government control

    With regards healthcare, that is a bigger issue, it's a very good system in Ireland.......if you have decent health insurance. A lot do, but a lot don't. But why have some very strong ministers been unable to improve things? It is a behemoth in terms of employee relations.

    I don't think there's a single head of Government anywhere who can claim to have everything working perfectly, or a single society/economy that provides equally for all citizens, and those that come closest, it's because of the societal culture, not their heads of government.

    I wouldn't mind Enda but I wouldn't be mad about him either. Him or Michael D? I'd prefer Michael. I think Enda would fulfil the duties but wouldn't be as proud or genuinely pleased to have the opportunity to represent the country as Michael D.


  • Registered Users Posts: 29,071 ✭✭✭✭Wanderer78


    Thomas__. wrote:
    Sure there is more to it than the failures of the government and I mean those responsible for the housing problems in the first place which I assume is more based on greed than any other thing the govt could solve, apart from providing more social housing which also takes time and demands money. I am not objecting your analysis, I'm just pointing out where the other responsibilities are.


    Yea I will agree that these issues are deep, complex and due to multi-systemic failure, including politically, but we shouldn't really be slapping ourselves and our political institutions on the back, on a job well done. We ve been following econ 101 to a tee, and it's failing, badly, sadly some seem to be forgetting this.


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,561 ✭✭✭JJayoo


    I thought Brolly was gonna run? Or just spouting his usual ****eee


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  • Posts: 0 [Deleted User]


    General Miriam for President?

    I look forward to the abolition of that ridiculously pointless office (formerly the Governor General), and the abolition of the equally parasitic Seanad Éireann (formerly the House of Lords). Using the old colonial offices to give jobs to the local political parasites on our taxes. Oh, and fúck off "President of Ireland" with pushing me off Irish roads to let any other Irish person, other than one in an emergency, pass. If you are Irish, your people were probably living in poverty not so long ago so quit with your very colonial notions over the rest of us.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 152 ✭✭Thomas__.


    Wanderer78 wrote: »
    Thomas__. wrote:
    Sure there is more to it than the failures of the government and I mean those responsible for the housing problems in the first place which I assume is more based on greed than any other thing the govt could solve, apart from providing more social housing which also takes time and demands money. I am not objecting your analysis, I'm just pointing out where the other responsibilities are.


    Yea I will agree that these issues are deep, complex and due to multi-systemic failure, including politically, but we shouldn't really be slapping ourselves and our political institutions on the back, on a job well done. We ve been following econ 101 to a tee, and it's failing, badly, sadly some seem to be forgetting this.

    When you take a look beyond the Republic of Ireland, you'll see that similar problems if not the same, are in other EU countries as well. That said in regards of housing problems and health care. For me, the main reasons for these problems are greed and profits which leaves fewer people who can afford it to pay for that by their income.


  • Registered Users Posts: 68,317 ✭✭✭✭seamus


    We've been lucky. We've had a string of excellent Presidents in my time, who've been firm, honest and respectable ambassadors for the state.

    The horse and pony show of the last election nearly left us with a FF stooge with no experience in any political role, but thankfully things turned around and we got Michael D.

    I personally voted for Norris, but in hindsight Micheal D. was the best candidate. There's every chance Norris would have inadvertently misspoken while on a foreign mission and caused an international incident, because he has a tendency to do that.

    If the choice was another farcical campaign with novelty candidates from TV shows like Miriam alongside the usual religious conservatives, or to just give Michael D. another 7 years, then Michael D. all the way.


  • Registered Users Posts: 21,525 ✭✭✭✭Tell me how


    General Miriam for President?

    I look forward to the abolition of that ridiculously pointless office (formerly the Governor General), and the abolition of the equally parasitic Seanad Éireann (formerly the House of Lords). Using the old colonial offices to give jobs to the local political parasites on our taxes. Oh, and fúck off "President of Ireland" with pushing me off Irish roads to let any other Irish person, other than one in an emergency, pass. If you are Irish, your people were probably living in poverty not so long ago so quit with your very colonial notions over the rest of us.

    Do you really believe this? What form of head of state bodies do you think we should have? Do you agree with the concept of diplomatic relations?
    In your life, how often have you been "pushed off the road"? I'm 39 and it has never happened me.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 152 ✭✭Thomas__.


    seamus wrote: »
    We've been lucky. We've had a string of excellent Presidents in my time, who've been firm, honest and respectable ambassadors for the state.

    The horse and pony show of the last election nearly left us with a FF stooge with no experience in any political role, but thankfully things turned around and we got Michael D.

    I personally voted for Norris, but in hindsight Micheal D. was the best candidate. There's every chance Norris would have inadvertently misspoken while on a foreign mission and caused an international incident, because he has a tendency to do that.

    If the choice was another farcical campaign with novelty candidates from TV shows like Miriam alongside the usual religious conservatives, or to just give Michael D. another 7 years, then Michael D. all the way.

    The 2011 election campaing was the funniest thing I have ever seen and it gave me much laughter in the light of how some of the candidates behaved. True, Michael D. Higgins was the only choice to make for having a sane and not self-centred President of the Republic of Ireland. If he will make it for another seven years, given his Age, he certainly would be the better choice so far, unless there is a candidate like Enda Kenny.


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  • Posts: 0 [Deleted User]


    Do you really believe this? What form of head of state bodies do you think we should have? Do you agree with the concept of diplomatic relations?
    In your life, how often have you been "pushed off the road"? I'm 39 and it has never happened me.

    Absolutely. The office of President of Ireland is a preposterous, anachronistic hangover from the British royalist parasitic cult which has burdened Ireland for centuries. The sole reason it exists is precisely because de Valera felt he needed to give an alternative office in order to reject the British position of Governor General. At a salary of €250,000 plus per annum, with no household expenses, it embodies political sycophancy at its worst. That's obscene money. It serves no democratic function that cannot be done by a Council of State, and the notion that he or she is essential to Ireland's 'diplomatic relations' is patently silly. We have professional diplomats abroad working behind the scenes to do those things. A democracy does not need such pomp and ceremony, even if 'Hello!' readers might want it.

    If I were looking for a president to admire, it would be Uruguay's José Mujica. Ireland has more than enough "Do as we say, not as we do" smoked salmon socialist politicians.

    As for pushing people off the road, it has happened me three times in this city in this republic. Once is enough. It happens to everybody who finds themselves in traffic when the President of Ireland wants to go on the same road. Just because it has not happened you does not mean it doesn't happen. If that person wants to go somewhere for a certain time, get up earlier. I sense that any Irish person who doesn't find this "Push the plebs off the road" culture disconcerting is a bit of a closet royalist at heart. Thoroughly objectionable, shameless carry on given our history.


  • Registered Users Posts: 68,317 ✭✭✭✭seamus


    Yes, everyone knows how much the Irish President likes to throw his weight around to push the plebs out of the way:
    BjqtcsUIAAAr_pd.jpg

    I don't recall a single time that I've ever seen or heard of any person or vehicle "pushed off the road" to make way for the Irish president. Once or twice I've had shickalonies stop traffic for 30 seconds at a junction to let him through. But that doesn't sound nearly as sensational as being "pushed off the road".

    Your distaste for pomp and ceremony is understandable and I share it in many aspects, but claiming that the office of the president is some kind of golden throne in Ireland is way off the mark.


  • Moderators, Politics Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 24,269 Mod ✭✭✭✭Chips Lovell


    Numerous other parliamentary democracies have a similar style of presidency, e.g. Germany, Italy, Israel etc. It's hardly unique, let alone a hangover from British rule.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 152 ✭✭Thomas__.


    Do you really believe this? What form of head of state bodies do you think we should have? Do you agree with the concept of diplomatic relations?
    In your life, how often have you been "pushed off the road"? I'm 39 and it has never happened me.

    Absolutely. The office of President of Ireland is a preposterous, anachronistic hangover from the British royalist parasitic cult which has burdened Ireland for centuries. The sole reason it exists is precisely because de Valera felt he needed to give an alternative office in order to reject the British position of Governor General. At a salary of €250,000 plus per annum, with no household expenses, it embodies political sycophancy at its worst. That's obscene money. It serves no democratic function that cannot be done by a Council of State, and the notion that he or she is essential to Ireland's 'diplomatic relations' is patently silly. We have professional diplomats abroad working behind the scenes to do those things. A democracy does not need such pomp and ceremony, even if 'Hello!' readers might want it.

    If I were looking for a president to admire, it would be Uruguay's José Mujica. Ireland has more than enough "Do as we say, not as we do" smoked salmon socialist politicians.

    As for pushing people off the road, it has happened me three times in this city in this republic. Once is enough. It happens to everybody who finds themselves in traffic when the President of Ireland wants to go on the same road. Just because it has not happened you does not mean it doesn't happen. If that person wants to go somewhere for a certain time, get up earlier. I sense that any Irish person who doesn't find this "Push the plebs off the road" culture disconcerting is a bit of a closet royalist at heart. Thoroughly objectionable, shameless carry on given our history.

    Funny post of yours. If you don't like it that the Taoiseach appoints himself you would need at least a chairman either of the Oireachtas, the Dáil or this supposed Council of the State. To have a President of the State is the basis of every democratic and parliamentarian Democracy that calls itself a Republic.


  • Registered Users Posts: 21,525 ✭✭✭✭Tell me how


    If I were looking for a president to admire, it would be Uruguay's José Mujica. Ireland has more than enough "Do as we say, not as we do" smoked salmon socialist politicians.

    There are things to admire about Jose but I do believe that a country should have a premier states person and an office which reflects well on its society. As I said, there is a lot to admire about the humility of Jose Mujica but would that image represent his country well when trying to encourage trade or investment? Does it show the country in a light which indicates strong education, business and economic frameworks?

    I am far from a rampant capitalist but drawing a line from Jose Mujicias example to say, that of Donald Trump in the sense of a president portraying an image which is going to have a positive impact on how the country is viewed internationally, I think we are doing very well with Michael D.

    As for you being pushed off the road, I think that it is being dramatic and not a real issue. It happened you 3 times, for how long each, 1 minute? So in your entire life you have being delayed by the presidential convoy for a total of 180 seconds?


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 16,015 ✭✭✭✭James Brown


    Probably not the most popular choice (which is baffling really) but I’d like to see Enda Kenny get in when Michael D does hang up his spurs.

    Kenny restored a lot of dignity to the offfice of Taoiseach, and like him or loathe him, he was the leader which restored Ireland to some sort of normality after the state in which it was left when he inherited the job.

    The problem is though in Ireland people have too short a memory, and water charges and it’s all the gubberments fault etc......

    Apologies if you're being sarcastic;
    The national crises are worse than when he inherited them.
    The man lied on a number of occasions and did an about turn on what got him in in 2011. In fact the next government he led, needed Fianna Fail, the very party he lambasted to get in in 2011. There's a lack of ethical scruples.
    As pointed out, with ever worsening crises in health and housing, since the crash, what recovery? The economy? It means naught obviously. Of course he's loved by the international money cartels. With the man with two pints and fairy tales about phantom phone calls and soldiers at ATMS, he's a joke of a man.

    We need somebody who won't be a laughing stock Norman Wisdom type on the world's stage.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 2,067 ✭✭✭368100


    seamus wrote: »
    Yes, everyone knows how much the Irish President likes to throw his weight around to push the plebs out of the way:
    BjqtcsUIAAAr_pd.jpg

    I don't recall a single time that I've ever seen or heard of any person or vehicle "pushed off the road" to make way for the Irish president. Once or twice I've had shickalonies stop traffic for 30 seconds at a junction to let him through. But that doesn't sound nearly as sensational as being "pushed off the road".

    Your distaste for pomp and ceremony is understandable and I share it in many aspects, but claiming that the office of the president is some kind of golden throne in Ireland is way off the mark.

    A work colleague was getting his hair cut in grafton barbers a few weeks ago when Michael D walked in, he sat and waited his turn despite being offered to skip the queue and when he was finished they offered no charge, again he insisted that he would pay and did so, leaving a generous tip in the process. M
    The man has integrity.


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 3,829 ✭✭✭Cork Boy 53


    368100 wrote: »
    A work colleague was getting his hair cut in grafton barbers a few weeks ago when Michael D walked in, he sat and waited his turn despite being offered to skip the queue and when he was finished they offered no charge, again he insisted that he would pay and did so, leaving a generous tip in the process. M
    The man has integrity.

    Not enough integrity to clearly state whether or not he intends to run for another term in the Aras..


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 2,067 ✭✭✭368100


    Not enough integrity to clearly state whether or not he intends to run for another term in the Aras..

    Is he obliged to at this stage? Maybe he just hasn't decided, its a big commitment given his age


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,194 ✭✭✭man98



    As for you being pushed off the road, I think that it is being dramatic and not a real issue. It happened you 3 times, for how long each, 1 minute? So in your entire life you have being delayed by the presidential convoy for a total of 180 seconds?
    I've been waiting at level crossings for longer than that.
    Michael D has done us proud and I have no doubt that if he decides to run, he will do us proud for the next seven years. A principled statesman. Not too sure on a Miriam presidency, though I'm sure she'd appeal to the Irish public in a Varadkar-esque spin over substance sort of way...


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  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 3,829 ✭✭✭Cork Boy 53


    368100 wrote: »
    Is he obliged to at this stage? Maybe he just hasn't decided, its a big commitment given his age

    I think he has decided and is playing a cagey game. For what its worth I reckon he will run again.


  • Registered Users Posts: 12,354 ✭✭✭✭TheValeyard


    I think he has decided and is playing a cagey game. For what its worth I reckon he will run again.

    I think he will run. If other political parties decide to go down the election route, I still think he'd win again.

    All Eyes On Rafah



  • Registered Users Posts: 6,261 ✭✭✭emo72


    i think hes been a very good president. however if he said he would only do one term he should stick to that. miriam for president? oh yeah, she should definitely run, i need a good laugh.


  • Registered Users Posts: 12,354 ✭✭✭✭TheValeyard


    Who else is there really that could beat him?

    All Eyes On Rafah



  • Registered Users Posts: 6,261 ✭✭✭emo72


    Who else is there really that could beat him?

    not sure myself. but let the candidates put their names forward. and may the best person win. adapts stan marsh accent" this is america isnt it?"


  • Registered Users Posts: 19,636 ✭✭✭✭Muahahaha


    Thomas__. wrote: »
    The 2011 election campaing was the funniest thing I have ever seen and it gave me much laughter in the light of how some of the candidates behaved.

    That 2011 election was utter carnage and pure entertainment. I would love a repeat of it this year ! From memory we had

    -Mary Davis, the Denis OBrien candidate who could not say a single sentence without mentioning the words Special Olympics. She ended up getting labeled the Quango Queen by the media and it stuck to her badly

    Dana- apart from the usual religious conservatism during the campaign she got embroidered in a row with her family members in the States who accuse her brother of sexual abuse. She then doubled down on her hysterics by claiming that a flat tyre on her car was an attempt to assassinate her

    Sean Gallagher- promised if elected he would bring jobs, jobs, jobs. A completely ridiculous claim by any politician, business people create jobs even though politicians like to try to take credit for it. Then we had the whole "if that man gave me an envelope", that Frontline debate was just pure entertainment

    David Norris- started off very well and polled at 20% at one stage. Then the old interview of him talking about pedestary surfaces and he plummets in the polls, iirc he almost pulled out of the race

    Gay Mitchell- a complete bore of a candidate who kept talking about how he could see the Aras from his council flat in Inchicore

    Martin McGuinness- I think he only ran just to troll the rest of the candidates. In that mission he was successful, he did come across very well imo so long as you forgot the past.

    After all the above we were left with Michael D. iirc in the 7 way debates he actually knew to keep his mouth shut and just stand back and look statesman-like whilst everyone around him was squabbling like children. It worked a treat.
    seamus wrote: »
    I don't recall a single time that I've ever seen or heard of any person or vehicle "pushed off the road" to make way for the Irish president. Once or twice I've had shickalonies stop traffic for 30 seconds at a junction to let him through. But that doesn't sound nearly as sensational as being "pushed off the road".
    .

    Funny story but in my case right before the Denmark football game I hitched onto the back of Michael Ds Army escort on his way to Lansdowne Road. I was on my motorbike going through the Park and they passed me by. I tagged myself on to the back of the escort but kept back far enough to not piss off the Army motorbike outriders. I got all the way from the Aras in the Park to OConnell Bridge in under 5 minutes, it was like Moses going through the Red Sea :D


  • Registered Users Posts: 14,336 ✭✭✭✭jimmycrackcorm


    Muahahaha wrote:
    Sean Gallagher- promised if elected he would bring jobs, jobs, jobs. A completely ridiculous claim by any politician, business people create jobs even though politicians like to try to take credit for it. Then we had the whole "if that man gave me an envelope", that Frontline debate was just pure entertainment

    I don't recall any such claim at all about bringing jobs. I liked him because his emphasis at the time was about being a president who could go abroad and talk about Ireland as a young dynamic business oriented country.

    Instead it looks like we'll keep the tradition of presidents being geriatrics as we had prior to electing Mary Robinson.


  • Registered Users Posts: 23,605 ✭✭✭✭Kermit.de.frog


    I personally think Higgins should step down.

    Give someone younger a chance.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 152 ✭✭Thomas__.


    Muahahaha wrote: »
    Thomas__. wrote: »
    The 2011 election campaing was the funniest thing I have ever seen and it gave me much laughter in the light of how some of the candidates behaved.

    That 2011 election was utter carnage and pure entertainment. I would love a repeat of it this year ! From memory we had

    -Mary Davis, the Denis OBrien candidate who could not say a single sentence without mentioning the words Special Olympics. She ended up getting labeled the Quango Queen by the media and it stuck to her badly

    Dana- apart from the usual religious conservatism during the campaign she got embroidered in a row with her family members in the States who accuse her brother of sexual abuse. She then doubled down on her hysterics by claiming that a flat tyre on her car was an attempt to assassinate her

    Sean Gallagher- promised if elected he would bring jobs, jobs, jobs. A completely ridiculous claim by any politician, business people create jobs even though politicians like to try to take credit for it. Then we had the whole "if that man gave me an envelope", that Frontline debate was just pure entertainment

    David Norris- started off very well and polled at 20% at one stage. Then the old interview of him talking about pedestary surfaces and he plummets in the polls, iirc he almost pulled out of the race

    Gay Mitchell- a complete bore of a candidate who kept talking about how he could see the Aras from his council flat in Inchicore

    Martin McGuinness- I think he only ran just to troll the rest of the candidates. In that mission he was successful, he did come across very well imo so long as you forgot the past.

    After all the above we were left with Michael D. iirc in the 7 way debates he actually knew to keep his mouth shut and just stand back and look statesman-like whilst everyone around him was squabbling like children. It worked a treat.


    Yes, that's how I remember it too. That was all a real Circus or something like a Muppet Show and Higgins was the cleverest one.
    McGuinness was genuine in running for President because with him as a SF candidate the whole campaign got more lively and he was good in embarrassing Gallagher which many people afterwards saw as a 'crook' and he took legal Action against the media because of the 'envelope' matter.

    Noris with his issue about 'allowing sex with minors' came across like a pervert to me, totally unacceptable to me to even think about making such suggestions.

    Mary Davis wasn't that much on my radar, rather a bore like the other one 'tetchy Michell' whom the media labelled him for being often in that manner when asked for an interview, akin to like starting a nervous fit when asked.

    Dana was more concerned with her Family Trouble in the USA than with anything to come up which would be interesting for Ireland. A total loser.

    I think that Higgins already had a positive reputation among the public and by the performance of the other candidates it made it easier for him to win in the end. The only one who could have one instead might had been McGuinnes if it wasn't for his dubious past in the IRA for which he's been always confronted by the People when canvassing the country. He got really tired and fed up with it and always deflected or denied any deep involvement in IRA activities past 1974. Apart from that, in regards of a UI, he would have certainly taken much efforts to further that matter. I have to admit that in the light of the latter, I was more in favour of McGuinness to see him win. But with Higgins the majority of the people voted for the better choice and therefore, if he runs for a second term this year, I am certain that he will win again.

    Anyway, to see some other candidates making a show of themselves would be probably great fun.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 945 ✭✭✭Colonel Claptrap


    Absolutely. The office of President of Ireland is a preposterous, anachronistic hangover from the British royalist parasitic cult which has burdened Ireland for centuries. The sole reason it exists is precisely because de Valera felt he needed to give an alternative office in order to reject the British position of Governor General. At a salary of €250,000 plus per annum, with no household expenses, it embodies political sycophancy at its worst. That's obscene money. It serves no democratic function that cannot be done by a Council of State, and the notion that he or she is essential to Ireland's 'diplomatic relations' is patently silly. We have professional diplomats abroad working behind the scenes to do those things. A democracy does not need such pomp and ceremony, even if 'Hello!' readers might want it.

    If I were looking for a president to admire, it would be Uruguay's José Mujica. Ireland has more than enough "Do as we say, not as we do" smoked salmon socialist politicians.

    As for pushing people off the road, it has happened me three times in this city in this republic. Once is enough. It happens to everybody who finds themselves in traffic when the President of Ireland wants to go on the same road. Just because it has not happened you does not mean it doesn't happen. If that person wants to go somewhere for a certain time, get up earlier. I sense that any Irish person who doesn't find this "Push the plebs off the road" culture disconcerting is a bit of a closet royalist at heart. Thoroughly objectionable, shameless carry on given our history.

    So much anger. Bizarre.


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