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Registering a Vintage Car from Uk in Ireland

  • 14-03-2017 12:22pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 4 marykennedy


    Hello Everyone,

    I'll try to keep this as concise as possible.

    My father bought a car in the UK last year, just before he became ill.

    I was aware that the car was there, but had no idea of what was entailed to get it registered here.

    Looking online, various paperwork is required, such as a dated receipt of sale and dated shipping information.

    I have located the receipt and UK log book, but no shipping information.

    Can anyone tell me how I go about proceeding with getting this registered.

    Thanks in Advance.

    M


Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 827 PaulK_CCI


    Is the car currently still in the UK, or had it already been shipped to Ireland? The shipping information is just to show when the car landed in Ireland either from a ferry ticket or transport company.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4 marykennedy


    Hi,

    Thanks for your reply. Sorry, I should have been clearer, in my post. It's currently in Ireland. He bought the car and became ill, before he could complete the registration. I'm only now aware of it. Looking at information online, it should be done within 30 days? Hence the shipping or transport information. As I can't locate that, my question, how do I now proceed?

    Thanks again for your reply.

    M


  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 25,535 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Dades


    What year is the car? If it's over 30 years I doubt there'll be any issues if you tell them the background.


  • Registered Users Posts: 433 ✭✭ onlyfinewine


    If you can check with your father which boat it arrived on, the ferry company should be able to trace the ticket for you. Alternatively if the car is thirty years old you should not have to pay VRT as you have it for a year before arrival in Ireland.


  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 25,535 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Dades


    Alternatively if the car is thirty years old you should not have to pay VRT as you have it for a year before arrival in Ireland.
    I've not heard of this. If the car is over 30 years old, the VRT will be a flat €200 regardless.

    The one year prior ownership exemption requires evidence of foreign residence, insurance etc. to claim, and doesn't really apply here I'm thinking.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 4 marykennedy


    No way to check with him, unfortunately . . . currently going through his personal effects.

    Yes, the car is over 30 years old, so it is vintage I believe.

    The issue, just to be clear from my understanding, is that once a car is brought from the UK, into to Ireland, it must be registered, within 30 days, hence the transport/ferry documentation.

    Again, just for clarity sake, I am from Ireland, living in Ireland, as was my father - the car was purchased in the UK.

    As I do not have this, I have an issue. Someone has mentioned that I explain the situation, not sure if that will satisfy the criteria?

    Thanks again for all the replies.

    M


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,027 ✭✭✭ Silvera


    I registered a car that was over 30 days in the country (with its previous owner) and there was no issue raised when I went to register it (I had the UK log book, plus a reciept from the Irish seller dated on the date I bought it).

    As stated, if the car is over 30 years old the VRT is a flat rate of €200. Any possible 'late fee' fines would only amount to a couple of euros per days so, in general, Revenue dont pursue such fees on vintage vehicles.

    Ring Revenue or the NCTS phone line 01-4135975 and explain the situation to them. They will tell you what is required in order to register the car.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4 marykennedy


    Hi Silvera,

    Thank you very much for that information, that's excellent.

    M


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,156 ✭✭✭ w124man


    Its likely that the VRT people will tell you when the car was brought into the country. Our wonderful revenue know when each car is brought into the country as every vehicle on a ship has to be logged with the ticket holders details. They also video the ship as the vehicles disembark.


    My brother tried to VRT a car he had had in the country for two years and when asked to show the transport details, he said he had lost them. The wee girl behind the desk said nothing, spent about two minutes searching on the computer and then told him the exact boat he came over on and that he used his credit card to purchase the ticket! This was less than a month ago.


    His €720 VRT eventually cost him two years road tax, VRT and a fine! Lesson there for us!

    ( my brother can get a little uppitidy with officials)


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,027 ✭✭✭ Silvera


    ^^^ Very interesting! I wasnt aware that Revenue had access (so easily) to such information.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 2,156 ✭✭✭ w124man


    Silvera wrote: »
    ^^^ Very interesting! I wasnt aware that Revenue had access (so easily) to such information.


    They have access to it because they gather it themselves. Next time you drive off the boat, look for the cameras and look at who is watching you, in fact you might even get to talk to them and show them your passport when you drive through their shed on your way out.


    Next time you put your car on the boat, put a motion sensitive camera inside your car and see what happens. Just for a giggle!


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,027 ✭✭✭ Silvera


    w124man wrote: »
    Next time you put your car on the boat, put a motion sensitive camera inside your car and see what happens. Just for a giggle!

    Revenue staff noting down make/model/reg numbers??


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,156 ✭✭✭ w124man


    Silvera wrote: »
    Revenue staff noting down make/model/reg numbers??


    Yes. Only for vehicles of 'interest'.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,156 ✭✭✭ w124man


    LIGHTNING wrote: »
    How would they get your credit card info? As that would be a massive data protection breech and a huge violation of PCI compliance standards. Same goes with the ferry details, if that happened to me I'd be kicking off an investigation to see how they got that info.


    Where does it say they got his credit card info?


  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 25,535 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Dades


    The revenue must be entitled to collect certain information pertaining to cars being brought into the country, which must be collected by the shippers.

    Method of payment for transport I'd say wouldn't contravene any PCI stuff.

    Comes across as big brother'esque but it's a great example of effective use of information.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,156 ✭✭✭ w124man


    Dades wrote: »
    The revenue must be entitled to collect certain information pertaining to cars being brought into the country, which must be collected by the shippers.

    Method of payment for transport I'd say wouldn't contravene any PCI stuff.

    Comes across as big brother'esque but it's a great example of effective use of information.


    I don't se it as big brother'esque at all. Lets break this down a little for those who are having difficulty getting their heads around this ...


    You buy a car in the UK. It has UK plates on it.
    How do you get it home? Ryanair? No! An Post? No! Boat? Yes!


    How do you get the car on the boat? You buy a ticket either online or at the port. You give your name, address and card details if you do it online - you might even give your mobile number as well. At the port, its not much different except you can pay with cash if you like. So they know who you are and where you live because you told them!


    Then you drive onto the boat and whilst you do, in the UK you are on camera. Have a look around the next time you are there. Immigration are given the ship's passenger list. The cargo (your car) is on the manifesto. We live in security conscious times.


    So you arrive home to Dublin or Rosslare or wherever and you have to get off the boat. To do this you have to drive through Customs and Immigration and they watch every movement. Sometimes they stop you, most times they don't. The CCTV keeps rolling.


    This is not rocket science you know and I wouldn't be at all surprised if they could tell you which plane you flew over on as well ....... well you did give Ryanair all your details which is in the bar code on your boarding pass isn't it???


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,093 ✭✭✭ hi5


    Why would Irish revenue go to all that trouble when you could get a ferry from Scotland to Northern Ireland and just drive across the border to the South?


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,796 ✭✭✭ Isambard


    you think there's no cameras on the borders?


  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 25,535 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Dades


    w124man wrote: »
    I don't se it as big brother'esque at all.
    Having citzens under constant surveillance is the very definition of Big Brother behaviour, no?

    I believe it good that various organisations work together with legally gathered data to prevent crime. I personally don't have an issue with this scenario. Though, unlike you I guess, I can understand why it doesn't sit well with some, and not through lack of understanding. There comes a point when there's one too many cameras watching.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,093 ✭✭✭ hi5


    I could put 5 or 6 cars on a lorry transporter in Newry, take the number plates off and drive across the border no problem.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 2,156 ✭✭✭ w124man


    hi5 wrote: »
    I could put 5 or 6 cars on a lorry transporter in Newry, take the number plates off and drive across the border no problem.


    Yes you could and yes you could get a ferry from Scotland and drive across the border. Im not disputing that at all. The system is getting tighter and tighter with more and more cooperation between departments. The 'information exchanges' that I have mentioned are all collected by the same department and they have been doing it for ages and ages. Ships manifestos are not a new thing, neither are passenger lists or having to drive past customs at ports.


    Revenue also have access to the DVLA and can check when a car has been 'de registered' or when the last MOT was done. Sure you can do that yourself online!


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 29 ✭✭✭ DublinGuy40


    Hi all, jumping in on this with a question. I am looking at buying a classic car, 1988. Its here in ireland but on UK plates and the guy who is selling says he has had it for 10 years. Surely he should have registered it? Should i steer clear or is it still possible to register here?

    He said he bought it from a UK guy who had a house in Ireland and thats how the car ended up here.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,796 ✭✭✭ Isambard


    get him to do the re-reg before purchase or negotiate a big drop in price


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 29 ✭✭✭ DublinGuy40


    really? will it be that difficult?


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,796 ✭✭✭ Isambard


    A minefield I'd say, what if the authorities recorded the car entering the Country? 10 years of penalties on the VRT.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 29 ✭✭✭ DublinGuy40


    ok thanks for the information. I am getting a bit suspicious that someone would own a UK car for 10 years and not register it.


  • Registered Users Posts: 10,076 ✭✭✭✭ elperello


    ok thanks for the information. I am getting a bit suspicious that someone would own a UK car for 10 years and not register it.

    It happens.
    People have a house here and bring over a car and leave it in the garage.
    Life moves on and the car gets left behind, literally.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,281 ✭✭✭ westtip


    Revenue are well and truly able to access whatever information they want.


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