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Milk Price III

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  • Registered Users Posts: 523 ✭✭✭Jack98


    I think when derogation goes it’s something to consider here, we have a place rented that would be just kept on for maps to be able to rear replacements each year. But if with the cost of rent and cost of rearing the heifer was much the same as contract rearing it would be a no brainer to go down that road and reduce workload and simplify the system.



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,623 ✭✭✭older by the day


    The last two years, yearlings have made good money at the mart, in fact a two year old Angus bullock could buy a very good fresian heifer after calving.

    The problem is, will it last. Another thing is, not every yearling will make 900/1000.

    If you have the land, especially outside blocks its is great but don't underestimate the expense of calf rearing. Because it ain't easy to get to 350kg on every calf

    Would we average 1.50 euro a day to keep them. Sell in march at 400 days, that's 600, plus the initial price of the calf



  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 3,680 Mod ✭✭✭✭Siamsa Sessions


    You’re not far off the mark there with those figures. My costs were around €400-450 to get a calf to its first birthday, assuming it’s a Feb/March calf. Then add the purchase price after that.

    I was out-wintering them on fodder rape and then reseeding the field. If that doesn’t fit into your plan, then you need to find shed space for them - or build a shed and add loan repayments to your costs.

    And as you said, not every bullock will hit 350kg on its first birthday.

    There’s a few quid in keeping them to 12 months but it has to be a fit for the farmer, the farm, the yard, etc.

    Trading as Sullivan’s Farm on YouTube



  • Registered Users Posts: 3,867 ✭✭✭GrasstoMilk


    it always lads that have never even tried some of the things you’ve mentioned there that give out about them.
    as an aside Who ever said anything about letting calves die?!

    For 10 years now we’ve had zero beef stock, would have had a jex herd up till 10 years ago, gone all high ebi fr now but still a big focus on bf and pr % and maintaining a light framed cow

    In the last 10 years we’ve gone from strength to strength as we increased cow numbers and went contract rearing. I’m not going to list my achievements here because it’ll only be taken as a vanity post but we’re doing just fine with 90% of our income coming from milk

    Don’t talk about something unless you have a clue about it

    A 6 week winter is something that was talked about 20 years ago when we had lower stocking rates, quota was around and we had a more predictable weather pattern. That’s all gone now, I’ve never heard anyone talk about a 6 week winter in the last good number of years. Most ppl I know would have at least 4 months of feed in the yard, lads got caught out this year because they were feeding from mid September which was a good month earlier and then the spring was shite on top of it



  • Registered Users Posts: 18,247 ✭✭✭✭Bass Reeves


    If you are in derogation and below 70-100 cows it's hard to justify beef. If you add rented land its really hard to get the figures right. Where it starts to come into play is if you have a decent land bank after you get to 70-100 cows you have to factor in workload and labour required. Add a fragmented holding and then beef really starts to come into play.

    I see a few lads with 70ish cows running a beef operation alongside and they are very comfortable but generally they are not renting expensive land. When you factor in present calf and cull prices maximising the price of both leaving the farm can add substantially to profitability

    Slava Ukrainii



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  • Registered Users Posts: 4,181 ✭✭✭orm0nd


    our yearling hex and aax heifers sold from 850 to 1200 , bullocks 820 to 1070 , we bought freshly calved heifers 1550 to 1770 we sell approx 500kgs ms to the co-op after rearing the calves on new milk. cows get about 1 ton of low cost meal per annum, weanlings get a kg/day during the grazing season, cull cows averaged 1250 after about 6 weeks feeding , as well we sell approx 350 lambs to the factory /marts

    our system is profitable for our farm , but a lot of the dairy willy waver brigade most likely laugh at us



  • Registered Users Posts: 641 ✭✭✭farmertipp




  • Registered Users Posts: 105 ✭✭grass10


    Great system for your farm seems very profitable



  • Registered Users Posts: 6,510 ✭✭✭jaymla627


    https://www.farmersjournal.ie/agribusiness/news/tirlan-saves-glanbias-blushes-on-pay-816389

    Bit galling, that the co-op got the above passed, ytheirs still way to much of a crossover between the plc and co-op



  • Registered Users Posts: 972 ✭✭✭pureza


    I see Tirlán the farmer owned and run CoOp are DOWN 1.5 cpl for April milk in base price to 41.58c0l of which 1.5cpl comes from the cookie jar



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  • Registered Users Posts: 29,233 ✭✭✭✭whelan2


    THey never paid what they were saying it was top ups of our own money, when the seasonality bonus was gone they had to do something. There's still lads feeding silage with no grass ..



  • Registered Users Posts: 6,510 ✭✭✭jaymla627


    Markets are after taking a really positive turn the last week, traders banking on a spring flush of milk are short now and realising milk supplies arent going to rebound, 43-44 cent is looking likely for the late summer/autumn…

    Playing the doom and gloom card isnt going to do alot for lads confidence going forward



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,626 ✭✭✭ginger22


    In our area of North Kerry there are a lot of lads planning to get out the end of the year. I know of 5, all 80 to 120 cow men.

    The local rep for Agritech was here yesterday collecting a cheque and he said that several of his customers are packing it in.



  • Registered Users Posts: 4,614 ✭✭✭straight


    MY AI man has alot of customers not breeding this year. They had no successors and were on the fence for a while but last year and now this year has made up their mind.



  • Registered Users Posts: 2,000 ✭✭✭green daries




  • Registered Users Posts: 11,113 ✭✭✭✭mahoney_j


    Arrabawn base up 1 cent to 40.15 ….support payment of 3 cent remains and new sustainability payment of 0.5 cent also leaving 43.65 cent base including above ….pretty surprised but happy full support maintained but would of been happier with 2 cent to base and cut cent off support


    think milk price has more to go in a positive way over next few months



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,932 ✭✭✭awaywithyou


    You'll be taking on more land.... Best wishes with the big block of ground you recently leased...



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,258 ✭✭✭atlantic mist


    tirlan 41.48

    base 39.58 plus 1.5 weather payment plus 0.5 sustainability



  • Registered Users Posts: 6,510 ✭✭✭jaymla627


    They really should of kept the 3 cent weather payment, milk intake down 9% versus last april, if you do the sums and take a 100 cow herd that where doing 29 litres last april and are back 9% thats 2.6 litres of milk a cow a day lost, and say their was an extra 3kgs of meal going in at 370 a ton, thats another 1 euro plus a cow a day...

    Round it off to €2.50 a cow a day lost due to lower milk yields and extra feed going in, thats 7000 euro of lost income for a 100 cow herd for the april milk cheque for 2024, versus a normal april



  • Registered Users Posts: 6,510 ✭✭✭jaymla627


    https://www.farmersjournal.ie/dairy/news/dairygold-cuts-staff-working-hours-due-to-milk-supply-drop-818849

    Anytime a co-op predicts a bounce back in milk supplies the reverse happens, the effects of the 220kgs for farmers in derogation by year end youd imagen will lead to autumn/winter volumes collasping with cows been culled earlier….

    A 10% drop in milk supply for dairygold at year end would probably leave the co-op loss making for 2024, its squeky bum time for alot of co-op heads



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  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 3,680 Mod ✭✭✭✭Siamsa Sessions


    Talk from the top table at a recent farm meeting is that supply is more likely to be down 15% rather than the 5% co-ops are officially stating.

    Trading as Sullivan’s Farm on YouTube



  • Registered Users Posts: 18,247 ✭✭✭✭Bass Reeves


    I think there is an interesting proposal going around at present. Limit the amount of tax free leasing any farmer can avail of. It would dampen rental prices

    Slava Ukrainii



  • Registered Users Posts: 6,905 ✭✭✭kevthegaff


    The lesser will want us to pay their tax and their sfp back again!



  • Registered Users Posts: 2,000 ✭✭✭green daries


    They will by God there gone to hell altogether from what I hear from lads



  • Registered Users Posts: 4,614 ✭✭✭straight


    It was all fun and games while all the BS was only affecting the farmer.



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,626 ✭✭✭ginger22


    The thing is all the fat cats will still get their money and whatever is left over is passed back to the farmer,



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,440 ✭✭✭cjpm


    There may be one less Beemer in the Dairygold car park. Some individual who retired or got a better gig……



  • Registered Users Posts: 641 ✭✭✭farmertipp


    board is being urged to cut costs but are only interested in whose going to be chairman . no cost cutting or restructuring in pipeline



  • Registered Users Posts: 6,510 ✭✭✭jaymla627


    They where down 5% for 2023 versus 2022 circa 70 odd millon litres, if they end up 10% down on 2023's production levels thats another 140 million litres less

    Losing 200 million litres of your milk supply in a 2 year period, is fairly serious, have they the cash reserves to absorb a hit like that?

    Ultimately price to the farmer will be cut/not rose to compensate, but that leads to a viscous cycle



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  • Registered Users Posts: 29,233 ✭✭✭✭whelan2


    How are you getting on with the milk lorry driver now



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