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Now Ye're Talking - to a member of An Garda Síochána

124

Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 2,457 livedadream


    I'm a firm believer in trying not to care about other people and their jobs... As long as their doing the right thing and helping the people that need to be helped who gives a **** where they park?
    If them parking wherever they like is the worst complaint we have then we pretty ****ing lucky.

    And do remember your speaking in generalisations not all gardai get free breakfast rolls and cups of tea from shops. Not all get free stuff, get a grip you seem to have a chip on your shoulder. Remember like mammy said if you don't have anything to say don't say anything at all they do double the work for half the pay put up with total scum bags and get ripped to pieces by the general public for doing heir jobs to fast to slow to good to bad they can't win.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,328 ✭✭✭ .G.


    I'm a firm believer in trying not to care about other people and their jobs... As long as their doing the right thing and helping the people that need to be helped who gives a **** where they park?
    If them parking wherever they like is the worst complaint we have then we pretty ****ing lucky.

    And do remember your speaking in generalisations not all gardai get free breakfast rolls and cups of tea from shops. Not all get free stuff, get a grip you seem to have a chip on your shoulder. Remember like mammy said if you don't have anything to say don't say anything at all they do double the work for half the pay put up with total scum bags and get ripped to pieces by the general public for doing heir jobs to fast to slow to good to bad they can't win.

    The parking was one thing I mentioned and the shop was the second one. Trivial I agree compared to the more serious ones I mentioned which you've ignored. I'm a firm believer that these fella's need to practice what they preach because they set the example they expect the rest of us to follow, even if they are exempt.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 2,078 368100


    Firstly...much respect. It's a job that I'm not sure I could do.

    My question is: Does the length of time the likes of the Adrian Donahue investigation is taking with apparent lack of progress annoy you or do you just think that it'll come to pass eventually with the people involved answering for it?


  • Registered Users Posts: 222 ✭✭ coyle21


    hello there, I am from NI and was in a filling station last week getting diesel, was driving off when a unmarked car pulls up beside me with a one guard in the car and starts asking me alot questions of what i'm doing here and so on and for my licence, had not licence on me but what information am suppose to give yourselves please when approached, made me feel like I was up to no good which was not the case at all


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,259 ✭✭✭ Comic Book Guy


    What was the most frightening experience you hand on the job? Have you ever feared for your life while on duty?
    Why do some of the force have such low powered cars?
    How deep would the most under cover garda be in a criminal organisation if any?


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  • Registered Users Posts: 28,710 Paully D


    Do you have any idea how fast you were posting?


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,582 ✭✭✭ 0ph0rce0


    coyle21 wrote: »
    hello there, I am from NI and was in a filling station last week getting diesel, was driving off when a unmarked car pulls up beside me with a one guard in the car and starts asking me alot questions of what i'm doing here and so on and for my licence, had not licence on me but what information am suppose to give yourselves please when approached, made me feel like I was up to no good which was not the case at all

    If you have done nothing, then you tell them nothing and carry on.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,009 ✭✭✭ Tangatagamadda Chaddabinga Bonga Bungo


    superg wrote: »
    The parking was one thing I mentioned and the shop was the second one. Trivial I agree compared to the more serious ones I mentioned which you've ignored. I'm a firm believer that these fella's need to practice what they preach because they set the example they expect the rest of us to follow, even if they are exempt.

    This is an AMA with a former Garda who has given answers here that people are interested in reading. It feels like you just want to rant about the chip on your shoulder instead of giving him a chance to respond to your and everyone else's question(s).


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,328 ✭✭✭ .G.


    superg wrote:
    Fair enough. What about the other things I mentioned. Not so much the shop stuff but the other things, expect from that too? Genuinely interested so I know whether to bother taking a reg and making a phone call. I asked the Garda twitter but they didn't answer me.

    This is an AMA with a former Garda who has given answers here that people are interested in reading. It feels like you just want to rant about the chip on your shoulder instead of giving him a chance to respond to your and everyone else's question(s).


    People have asked me stuff, I've answered them. As you say I just have questions like everyone else. Maybe folk should just let him answer them rather than voice their opinion about my questions and me in general?


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,011 ✭✭✭ job seeker


    Will a qualification in Irish always be a requirement for entering the gardai ?
    Also do you think the qualification requirement for the Gardai is a little dated?

    I ask this as I done the leaving cert applied in school and that didn't include irish, so I couldn't apply.

    And, what's the fastest speed you ever experience in a car or on motorbike?
    Also, do you think gardai should be armed?
    Also, Whats your favourite takeaway meal?


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  • Registered Users Posts: 4,434 ✭✭✭ harr


    How pissed off were you with the judicial system in this country....a number of months ago I had to give a very small bit of evidence in a violent burglary ...seen a person at certain location ...the person involved had kicked the **** of a 70 year old man during the break in and he had 20 plus previous convictions most for robbing elderly people, a right scum bag and he was caught red handed..
    I was very surprised at the court process and how long it took to bring him in front of a judge (3 years) ... anyway over 30 witnesses were called most for very small details...the case took 4 days..I wasn't called till last day so I had to wait around 4 days ... the end result in all that effort was the jury finding him guilty but the judge gave a suspended sentence ...because he was attending a Drug programme and his girlfriend was due a baby...the guards involved in case were so pissed off and I could tell morale was not good..
    Did you have many cases like this ??


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 7,624 ✭✭✭ Little CuChulainn


    superg wrote: »
    People have asked me stuff, I've answered them. As you say I just have questions like everyone else. Maybe folk should just let him answer them rather than voice their opinion about my questions and me in general?

    But your question has been answered. Gardaí are exempt from a number of laws when on duty, road traffic being the main ones. There are some exceptions, notably drunk driving and dangerous driving. Also, putting a siren on and going through the light then turning it off is the way it's supposed to be done in many cases.

    As to free food and coffee, some places do it some don't. Most do it because they like to have Gardaí on the premises, some do it because they appreciate the job Gardaí do, some simply have a corporate policy. You can call it taking advantage if you want but there is nothing demanded, nothing expected in return and no issue if they decide to charge.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,944 ✭✭✭ mad m


    Just to say, it must of been very hard to walk away from 10 years of being a Garda.

    Goodluck in the future and thanks for the last 10 years.


  • Administrators, Social & Fun Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 18,717 Admin ✭✭✭✭✭ hullaballoo


    No problem with free tea for AGS tbh. They should get free everything imo, because the salaries are a disgrace.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 18,300 ✭✭✭✭ The Backwards Man


    Jessica Fletcher, friend of the Sheriff or nosy busybody?


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 11,812 ✭✭✭✭ evolving_doors


    When in the squad car did ye ever fight over changing the radio station?


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 4,935 ✭✭✭ TallGlass


    job seeker wrote: »
    Will a qualification in Irish always be a requirement for entering the gardai ?

    There's no Irish requirement. It's two languages one of which must be English or Irish. So you can use English and something else. Example, English and Polish. You do however, study Irish in the college, it ain't optional. If you've only English, and nothing else then you can do an Irish assessment with the PAS. Hope this helps!


  • Registered Users Posts: 21,247 ✭✭✭✭ Esel


    Who muled the handles out of the inside of the back doors of the squad cars?

    Not your ornery onager



  • Company Representative Posts: 9 ✭✭✭ I'm a Garda, AMA


    I'm going to keep my answer a bit shorter in order to answer more questions, I hope ye don't mind.
    jimgoose wrote: »
    Is there any truth, any truth whatsoever, to David McSavage's documentary series on Garda training? My nephew became a Garda recently enough, and he says there isn't. I don't quite believe him though, I think the youngfella is a little embarrasseed. :D

    Haven't seen it so I can't comment on it.
    A few years back, the wife set off to her folks in Mayo (we live in dublin).
    she set off about 7am.

    About 90 mins later, there's a knock at the door, so i run down in my shorts and it's 2 Gardai, obviously something had happened and not something good.

    Garda: are you Mr X
    Me: No, I'm Mr Helimachoptor
    Garda: Is this number X on Y Road
    Me: Nope, this is number X on Y Street
    Me: What happened

    In short, the lady living at that address had been in a fatal car accident, the 2 lads were on their way to deliver the news.

    They apologised profusely.. but that was a conversation that was never going to be easy.

    Have you had to deliver this news? Who decides what Gardai go? Are they specially trained?

    I've had to do it quite a number of times, and it never gets easier. You can get all out sandess to fuming anger, and everything inbetween. Usually, the investigating member goes, but if you're lucky enough to have a Family Liason Officer working, they can be sent, and they're trained in bereavement notifications among a slew of other things.
    Hi are you and your fellow Gardai as p1ssed off with the Judiciary and there persevered bad sentencing as most of the general population seem to be?

    Also Concurrent or Consecutive sentencing?

    Yes, imo. It's very disheartening to go to all that time and effort only to see pal walk out of court. And I don't believe concurrent sentencing should even be a thing. If someone committed a crime while on bail, the time should be consecutive.
    Did you ever feel sorry for someone that was arrested and went to prison? As in they showed remorse ect. but got sent to jail anyway because they got a judge on an off day ect.

    I ask because we hear about someone not going to prison with 40+ convictions and them thinking the whole system is a joke. But rarely do we hear stories of someone in the opposite position, ie were in the wrong place at the wrong time, no previous convictions, a Garda didn't take a liking to them, judge was extra grumpy that particular day. And someone got 'sent down' for something most others don't.

    No, if someone is being sent to prison, they done something very wrong. You'll always get the people who claim innocence, but I've never felt that someone had been prosecuted in the wrong. Well, not with any of the cases I've dealt with or seen. If someone has no previous convictions, depending on the severity of the incident, jail time would be unlikely.
    Utah wrote: »
    Thanks for doing this. Very interesting.

    1. Do Gardai get tired of stamping passport photos?
    2. Do the Gardai find it amusing when on a motorway and nobody will overtake them even though they're under the speed limit?
    3. Do you think anything should be changed about the current uniform?

    1: You have no idea...
    2: Extremely!
    3: The whole lot. It's too much like a suit, and not meant for chasing, or climbing over stuff. Make it more like the community policing uniform.
    orthsquel wrote: »
    Do you think that the twitter account of AGS is a benefit to getting specific messages out there?

    You mentioned your own mental health is a factor in your decision to leave.... given that mental health - and mental health in the workplace - is a big topic being discussed, if AGS was investing in this area (e.g. on the back of new methods to support staff from HR e.g. a health and well-being declaration, a mental health champion) would you support that? I assume Gardai see an awful lot of bad stuff while on duty, what sort of supports are there for Gardai who are injured or affected by a situation while on the job?

    Does the Garda Band still operate?

    Oh and what do Gardai generally think of vigilantes? Does anyone in AGS wish there was Batman around to do what they can't?

    1: I think it's been very useful, and while people may have started following due to some funny posts, the information they provide gives an insight into some of the daily runnings of Gardaí.

    2: It has been an issue for a while, and a new counselling service has just been rolled out (24/7 phone service and follow up meetings). It has a bit of a way to go, but it's a good start. It's a major issue in any walk of life now, AGS are no different, and it can be worse in AGS due to the incidents we attend.

    3: I believe so

    4: I wouldn't say no to Oliver Queen or Barry Allen making an appearance, but I think they'd cause more paperwork than anything.
    Sligo1 wrote: »
    Do you think the uniform helped you on the pulling front? lol

    Gardi work so hard and are put in such dangerous situations beyond their control. Thank you for all you do or have done...

    Maybe, in my younger and fitter days. It's not exactly a sexy uniform...
    jonsnow wrote: »
    You,ve alluded to nepotism in AGS earler. Do you believe this is a lsarge part of the reason for such a small numbers of minorities in the guards.

    Also do you believe that a quota system like the psni should be implemented so that there is a police force which accurately reflects the wider population re minorities?

    Thanks for your time

    No, not in the slightest. I think there's only a few minorities, because not many have applied. They still have to pass an Irish test like everyone else, and that probably puts some off. Quotas are all well and good, but I want the person beside me to know what they're doing over what race or religion they are. Once that's fulfilled, they could be from any background, I don't care.
    Rory28 wrote: »
    Going back to the cannabis. Is there a consensus in the Gardaí for it to be legalised or at least decriminalised? And if it did become legal what would happen to someone with a possession charge from before it was made legal?

    Im not even sure if its called a possession charge over here. But it is on the TV and thats good enough for me.

    I don't think there is. A lot still believe that once a drug, always a drug. I'm a bit more liberal. It's supposed to have been decriminalized this year. Historical simple possession offences wouldn't be affected.
    If a person declined to give a bailiff a salmon fishing license,could you intervene ?

    Depends, it could be the trout of no craic pretending to be the salmon of knowledge again. If it's a genuine question, I have no idea! That sounds like a civil matter to me.
    Are there many undercover Gardaí and if so, how deep undercover would they go i.e. fabricating new identities, being apart from real family for weeks?

    I've no idea. But they do exist. As to what level, again, I don't know.
    Nekarsulm wrote: »
    What were your opinions on the Gardai Reserve?
    Valuable resource or cost saving bulking up of the Force by idealist busy-bodies?

    Brought in to increase the numbers, and ineffectively used. They could be beneficial, but they're not being used correctly yet (what that is, I don't know). Some were fine, using it as a backdoor to get into AGS, some were just nosy, some were genuinely interested in helping.
    GBX wrote: »
    Great idea and fair play for taking the time to answer questions. I've no doubt its a hard job to do(and getting harder) with the lack of resources available. Its obviously a job with many frustrations.

    Not sure if this has been asked already:

    There was a lot of public outcry to the use of Garda personnel when the water meters were being installed and the fact that this was protection for a private company on behalf of the state. Was this a role you had to do - and if not - what was the general consensus within the force that Gardaí were tasked with doing this when there is so much more these Gardaí could have been doing on the crime side of things?
    (I'm not trying to start a Garda bashing point - I'm just curious - I have an uncle who retired after near 30 years a Garda so I have the upmost respect for the job you have to do.)

    The quick and simple answer is, the protests were highjacked by a small fringe of people who just wanted to cause trouble. Because of this, Gardaí were required to protect the workers and equipment, because they were the ones with the most immediate threat to their persons and property. That is the only reason they were there, to prevent crime. It was 100% required, because you saw what happened when they weren't there.
    beertons wrote: »
    Holy moley, that was the longest multiquote I ever read.

    Head to coppers much when up in the big schmoke?

    I've been once, and I don't understand why people go there...
    ED E wrote: »
    Thanks for answering my previous two questions. I'll be greedy and ask a third.

    What would your views be on having a civilian head of the force/police head but appointed from an external background?

    It could be beneficial, but AGS is unique, and I don't think anyone who hasn't worked as a frontline Garda would be qualified enough for the role, even retired commissioners from other forces. I think the Commissoner should be a Garda, but voted on by it's members, and not politically appointed. AGS and politics should be no where near each other.
    When you were off duty and heading home in your private car, if someone over took you exceeding the speed limit could you have pulled them in?

    ever use the siren for non Garda stuff when in the squad car like beating the traffic to get to a shop before closing?

    I had dealings with someone I don't know via Donedeal that didn't work out on my side of the deal. After getting burnt I subsequently found out that said individual is "known to the Gardaí". The money involved is small enough but its the principal of it that annoys me. Should I just walk away and take it as a lesson learnt or what would you have recommended in your former role?

    1: The law does cover it, but I can't see a safe way to do it. Ring it in, and be a Garda witness instead would be my opinion.

    2: No, but the temptation is there. Usually when you've just got hot food for the break you hope to get, and you've less chances of being sent to a call when you're already on the break. But no, it would be stupid, a small mistake is all it takes, and for what?

    3: It all boils down to the injured party. They must be willing to make a statement and follow it to court to give evidence, because that's sometimes all the evidence there is, the persons word. Without it, there's no evidence, so nothing can be done. Then you have issues with proving ownership. Most people don't have the serial numbers of their valuables, and without it, proving ownership can be impossible.
    superg wrote: »
    Why do Gardai feel they can park anywhere they like anytime they like? Why do Gardai feel they can flout the road traffic laws they expect the rest of us to observe? For example mobile phone use while driving, speeding, sticking the blue lights on to get through bad traffic then knocking them off again once through. How many take advantage of their status to get free stuff. I use a deli in Dublin and a few Gardai are regulars yet I've never seen them pay for anything.

    I see all this stuff on a regular basis and it gives the rest of you a bad name and like you spoke of earlier, damages any hope that people will respect Gardai.

    Sometimes, parking badly can't be avoided due to the nature of the incident. I've always tried to park as legally as possible, but sometimes time can be against you (ie: burglary in progess, suspect in the area) and blatant abandonment cant occur. The traffic laws, I don't think any member should be visibly flouting the exemptions to it. But AGS are exempt those laws as long as it's for a legal reason. Also, sometimes calls require a quick but quiet response. And aside from a few gone off pastries and the odd cup of tea, I've paid for everything, simple for the reasons you stated.
    Hi there!

    In regards to medical emergencies, are all Gardai trained in basic first aid?

    Basic yes. More re-training is required though, and some members have trained themselves to a higher level.


  • Registered Users Posts: 21,247 ✭✭✭✭ Esel


    Depends, it could be the trout of no craic pretending to be the salmon of knowledge again. If it's a genuine question, I have no idea! That sounds like a civil matter to me.

    Touché. :)

    Who muled the back doors of the squad cars?

    Did you have a padlock* or a combination** lock on your locker? Or both? Did you even have a locker?

    * Not Tricircle, hopefully.
    ** Not 0000 or 1234, obv.

    Good luck, and thanks!

    Not your ornery onager



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  • Registered Users Posts: 24,252 ✭✭✭✭ Cookie_Monster


    3: The whole lot. It's too much like a suit, and not meant for chasing, or climbing over stuff. Make it more like the community policing uniform.

    admit it, you just want to be able to wear shorts to work
    :D


  • Company Representative Posts: 9 ✭✭✭ I'm a Garda, AMA


    Carnacalla wrote: »
    Definitely the best AMA I've ever seen!

    Just one question, did you ever notice people in general getting nervous around you, purely because you were a guard?

    The whole time. Meeting new people can be very unnerving when you're a Garda, because you don't know if they'll be indifferent, amused, excited, or unluckily, someone that hates AGS. People are less likely to be themselves around a Garda, but i'm able to switch off when I was not working. And I can understand some peoples nervousness, there are some members who live and breathe the job. I had one friend from secondary school walk away from me when I told him what I was.
    Hows things.

    1. What are your experiences of fitness levels in the AGS and do you think an annual fitness test should be mandatory.

    2. Never having worn an AGS uniform, do you feel it should be upgraded to a more suitable and flexible design for regular Garda.

    3. I know a good few people who left the DF and joined the AGS. I almost did myself. Have you ever met any ex DF and how did they fair out? Was there any difference between ex Army AGS members and regular AGS members?

    4. Thanks for serving over the years, i'm sure you made a difference.


    1: I think annual fitness tests are way overdue. It should be a thing, but only if the facilities are provided. I think it's a bit rich to expect super fit Gardaí, but not assist in any way to maintain that. Fitness can go out the window very quick, when not getting back to the station for a break can be the norm, food on the go, and shur there's nothing healthy to buy at midnight aside from a few gone off rolls in the local deli, or takwaways. It's hard to juggle everything and still eat healthy and stay fit.

    2: Yes, it needs to be changed very badly. It's like wearing a suit while chasing people through fields, states, over walls, etc. God forbid if you accidentally wear the "winter pants" in summer, your legs will boil inside them. Never kept you warm in the winter either... Something like the community policing uniform would be perfect.

    3: I've actually never met one. I wanted to go from AGS to the Army, but I left it too late and was too old.
    KonFusion wrote: »
    Ever stop a motorcycle for driving in the bus lane?

    Are you ever out with friends or family and witness them 'breaking the law' such as speeding, or something simple like that? Does it bother you or do you shrug it off when not on duty? Do they expect that you can provide them with favors if they get into trouble?

    Does being a member of AGS have an impact on your personal relationships friends or family for better or worse (or no impact at all)?

    1: No, can't say I have, but we didn't have bus lanes where I was stationed. Can't see the harm as long as they're pottering along, better than weaving in and out of traffic. Different story if they're flying down it or preventing official users of it from using it. But bikes can quickly merge back in, cars can't. I think it would be safer for bikes to use them.

    2: Every driver breaks the law every day. Fact. And don't anyone say you don't because you do, every day. Might be simple and small, but you still broke it (crossing the white line, not stopping in time at a light, going into bus/cycle lanes, etc). Family are the same, they make mistakes too, but in general, they seemed to be a little more cautious around me. They'd want to do something fairly bad for me to say anything though. I try to switch off, I don't think it's healthy to be "on" the whole time. Favors, yeah, they think I can, but they also know that I can't.

    3: My parents were delighted. My brother and sisters shocked. Some friends no longer talk to me. It does have an effect. It's how you deal with it that counts. I didn't let the job overburden me as best I could, and never brought my work home. But I have had girlfriends do their best to console me because I kept a straight face for 8+ hours after seeing something horrible, and just broke down the minute I got home. That has an effect. But, I've learned that I've surround myself with people who I can confide in, who take me as what I am and what I was (Garda). I've found that the real friendships I've made while a Garda are stronger than the ones I've made before, and that includes Garda and non-Garda friends.
    0ph0rce0 wrote: »
    Similar to the above

    If I'm walking down the street as normal in the middle of the day and the guards stop me and start asking questions like name & address, Where I'm going / coming from.

    Do I have to answer them if they have no proof or suspicion of me causing an offence. Do I not have to be informed of an offence and under what act in which I'm being stopped for before they can ask me anything.

    Or will they just pull the Public Order Act ****e and make stuff up until you give your information?

    A Garda can ask you anything, but can only demand some things. If you've done nothing wrong, answer the questions. You may be similar to a suspect, you may be the only person nearby after a crime was committed. As long as that Garda is doing their job right, you shouldn't have anything to worry about. It'd be rare for me to approach someone without reason, not worth the potential hassle. If you're being searched, yes, a reason has to be given and the relevant law referenced (I believe that it's no longer a requirement to quote the law there and then, as long as you can give the relevant details like the Act and Section and the basic gist of it - could be wrong, but I remember reading a court outcome stating something like that, double check it). And the public order act covers a lot...
    I would imagine being a Garda you would need a hell of alot of patience, esp dealing with time wasters, people who love a bit of drama etc, did you find the job testing your patience alot of the time? And how did you manage it?

    Roughly, how many people have become/are a guard that are not suitable for the job? eg lazy, doing it for status, poor communication skills, too much of a push over etc

    Your patience is tested on a nearly minute basis. Be it from someone who "knows my rights", to the odd encounter with the Freemen of Ireland (smh), to people asking you something that you couldn't possibly know (like the bus timetable), to people who ring in and just want to rant, yeah, it takes a lot of patience. And then you've the patience of dealing with colleagues who are so different from one another, management who seem to only care about figures, it comes from everywhere. And you just have to make sure to stay calm and get the information across or the job done. You pick it up naturally over time, but it took a lot of self control at the start, especially when it's something common sense would solve.

    Can't put a figure on that, everyone is unsuitable for the job until they join, because nothing can prepare you for it. You could be lucky and get a quiet station, you could be unlucky and get Store or Pearse Street (the 2 busiest stations in the country). I'm sure there are a few that joined for status, but if that's all they joined for, i'd say they're gone by now, because no amount of status would be worth it. Anyway, what status anymore? Everyone can be trained to be a good Garda, it takes longer for some. But that's natural.
    368100 wrote: »
    Firstly...much respect. It's a job that I'm not sure I could do.

    My question is: Does the length of time the likes of the Adrian Donahue investigation is taking with apparent lack of progress annoy you or do you just think that it'll come to pass eventually with the people involved answering for it?

    It is annoying, especially with incidents that really hit home. But, with about 10 years done, it starts to get understandable. Lack of evidence, missing witnesses, eloped criminals, changes in law, withdrawal of evidence. It would be great to do a Law and Order on it and get it sorted in a few days. But that's not realistic for the majority of cases. We all hope that eventually D/Gda Donohue's murder will be solved, and those responsible will be held so.
    coyle21 wrote: »
    hello there, I am from NI and was in a filling station last week getting diesel, was driving off when a unmarked car pulls up beside me with a one guard in the car and starts asking me alot questions of what i'm doing here and so on and for my licence, had not licence on me but what information am suppose to give yourselves please when approached, made me feel like I was up to no good which was not the case at all

    Answer any question you feel comfortable answering. We understand that nervousness does occur, simply because of the fear of doing something wrong in front of a Garda, which can cause you to do something wrong. It happens, and we can tell the difference. Just have your documents in order, the car in good shape, and you should have nothing to worry about. As I said, a Garda can ask you anything, but can only make lawful demands.
    What was the most frightening experience you hand on the job? Have you ever feared for your life while on duty?
    Why do some of the force have such low powered cars?
    How deep would the most under cover garda be in a criminal organisation if any?

    1: Can't go into details, but yes, I feared for my life on more than one occasion. Let's just say it was 50/50 if I lived or died, not an injury, but an event. At that stage, self preservation kicks in, and you're legally covered if your life is in danger, even if a Garda. It's crazy how far people will go to avoid us, and social media is plastered with "cop haters" (Garda haters? Doesn't have the same ring).

    2: Money. i30's are cheaper than purpose built patrol cars.

    3: Honestly have no idea.
    job seeker wrote: »
    Will a qualification in Irish always be a requirement for entering the gardai ?
    Also do you think the qualification requirement for the Gardai is a little dated?

    I ask this as I done the leaving cert applied in school and that didn't include irish, so I couldn't apply.

    And, what's the fastest speed you ever experience in a car or on motorbike?
    Also, do you think gardai should be armed?
    Also, Whats your favourite takeaway meal?

    1: I can't see the national police force of Ireland losing Irish at any soon stage. But I can't say for definite. Hard to say if it's dated, the leaving cert is required for most jobs these days, and i'd say you'd be able to still apply even without Irish, but I think you need at least a second language. Don't quote me on that though. Ring the college in Templemore, they'll tell you more.

    2: Fastest speed, hmmm. In a chase I was observer in, we did hit the 200kph mark, but the was an Avensis. I've never been in the high powered cars. Never took a bike for a proper spin.

    3: Whatever is open at 4am!
    harr wrote: »
    How pissed off were you with the judicial system in this country....a number of months ago I had to give a very small bit of evidence in a violent burglary ...seen a person at certain location ...the person involved had kicked the **** of a 70 year old man during the break in and he had 20 plus previous convictions most for robbing elderly people, a right scum bag and he was caught red handed..
    I was very surprised at the court process and how long it took to bring him in front of a judge (3 years) ... anyway over 30 witnesses were called most for very small details...the case took 4 days..I wasn't called till last day so I had to wait around 4 days ... the end result in all that effort was the jury finding him guilty but the judge gave a suspended sentence ...because he was attending a Drug programme and his girlfriend was due a baby...the guards involved in case were so pissed off and I could tell morale was not good..
    Did you have many cases like this ??

    Unfortunately, this happens a lot. I can't see why he can't continue the drug rehabilitation in jail, and he should have thought about his pregnant missus before committing yet another burglary, this time aggravated. Very surprised he got off with it, and it just another example of the justice system failing. Space is limited in prison, but it's a bad sign with a male with 20+ previous convictions doesn't get time for assaulting and old man. But it all boils down to evidence at the end of the day. So it's impossible to comment on any one case without seeing all the evidence and witnessing the entire court procedure. It does piss off members, daily. I've had a few, but sometimes it happens, you just have to hope for the best and trudge along.
    Jessica Fletcher, friend of the Sheriff or nosy busybody?

    Prime suspect. She's always there, too coincidental if you ask me...
    Gebgbegb wrote: »
    When in the squad car did ye ever fight over changing the radio station?

    Eh, what radio? They're all removed...
    TallGlass wrote: »
    There's no Irish requirement. It's two languages one of which must be English or Irish. So you can use English and something else. Example, English and Polish. You do however, study Irish in the college, it ain't optional. If you've only English, and nothing else then you can do an Irish assessment with the PAS. Hope this helps!

    You learn something new every day!
    Esel wrote: »
    Touché.

    Who muled the back doors of the squad cars?

    Did you have a padlock* or a combination** lock on your locker? Or both? Did you even have a locker?


    * Not Tricircle, hopefully.


    ** Not 0000 or 1234, obv.

    Good luck, and thanks!


    1: Prisoners, usually using them as a grip to get more oomph behind that kick. And in fairness, have you ever tested the handle of an i30? Shoddy workmanship Ted.

    2: Eh, have a locker, had a lock, but it seems pointless as you can open them anyway. And i'm stupidly security aware! 7777 is a great password. It's too high for people to try from 0000 to 1111 to 2222... They get bored!


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,915 The flying mouse


    Another question, Thanks :-)


    What do you think of certain crime journalists who it seems work hand in hand with some garda in putting information out there ,Sometimes misinformation. Would you think that's a good thing or a bad thing,and all part of the game. Should iyo the media stick to just reporting the news instead of being a Garda channel ?

    Thanks once again.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8 ✭✭✭ sagemaster


    In relation to the Fishery question perhaps it was a serious query. Actually it's a criminal matter, The Fisheries Acts protecting Salmon is quite a serious matter. You obviously didn't work in an area that had Salmon or Seatrout rivers. The answer to this question is yes, Gardai are authorised officers under the Principal Act and remain authorised officers. If asked to assist a Fishery Officer the Gardai are obliged and in several cases do attend. Like a lot of offences there is a power to demand name and address from a suspect/offender. If this is refusedfailed/misleading there is a power of arrest by Gardai and Fisheries officers. Fisheries offences are very serious but tend not to attract serious sentences by judges, but they are serious offences and most certainly not a civil matter.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,404 ✭✭✭ corkgsxr


    Do they rely on the fact that most will just stop when the blues come on that ye have those hyundais

    What's the worst part of the i30s. Eg Handling or power


  • Registered Users Posts: 17,741 ✭✭✭✭ Drumpot


    Simply superb thread and extremely interesting and enlightening answers.

    1. Do you think it would be beneficial to try and move Garda away from paperwork by employing non Garda people to assist? For example, Garda recites incident into a recording device, says everything he might have to take more time writing down and another person types it up. Recording and statement are preserved. Perhaps there are better or more efficient ways but I think you get the idea.

    2. Coupled with one, would it be good to have non Garda experts to assist with different elements of the job. For example, having specified "bad news" Garda whose main job is delivering bad news for accidents etc? Or have experts assist in traumatic incidents or investigations where Garda can be drained emotionally? I mean, more external or alternative resources to reduce the "jack of all trades" garda that you have eluded to in your responses.

    3. This is just an annoyance of mine. Do you think there is any reason why all cars and vehicles (asides from emergency etc) are not capped at 120kmh? Do you feel this would be helpful?

    4. Do you feel the upper levels of AGS are really in tune with lower levels or are they as discounnected as other top levels in the public service? Further to this, do you feel that there were people who are in high positions lacking the competence or professionalism to perform that role in the most productive manner?

    5. Why aren't there even one full time unit on the m50 or m1 motorways? There's been plenty of times I've seen awful or drunk drivers and once I phoned the nearest station and nobody came in the 15 minutes I happened to be near a driver. There are sections of the motorway for Garda, /surely there's enough incidents and accidents to warrant a car on either side of motorways?

    6. Do you think that some speed limits in some areas, where AGS regularly monitor , are questionable or potentially income generating schemes as opposed to dangerous driving deterrents? I can think of several roads, particularly on non built up areas, where the speed limit is extremely low, where it feels like there is not many RTCs and that the monitoring of said area is simply a racket under the guise of road safety. How is it decided to monitor different roads at different times of year?

    Thanks for the answers. I couldn't put the thread down last night and was enjoying reading during my morning coffee!


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,722 ✭✭✭ Bummer1234


    Whats your plans for the future?

    When younger,did you always want to be a gaurd?


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 2,812 Vojera


    I'm from the country but married a Dub and now living in Ballymun, and the attitude around here towards AGS is just disgusting. I honestly can't get over how it permeates the entire community, down to even pre-school children. You wouldn't believe how often I've heard people talking about the Ronan MacLochlainn case, saying things like "if those pigs had taken the day off like they were supposed to, that would never have happened."

    In areas like this, do you think there'll ever be a restoration of a "normal" attitude towards the gardaí?


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,151 ✭✭✭ kupus


    When I was growing up we used to see gardai out walking the streets and basically conversing with the community. How come we dont see that anymore? Instead we see them in cars. Passing by.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 100 ✭✭ Sparky_7


    Did my interview for AGS last week waiting to hear now if I passed or not!

    Any tips for me or should I look for another job after the experience you've had?


This discussion has been closed.
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