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Hurling jab lift

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  • 09-10-2016 9:54am
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 4,298 ✭✭✭


    Looking for some advice here. I'm training a group of under 10s and we were practicing the jab lift during the week. I understood that you should always do this with the toe of the hurl facing outwards. I corrected a few of the kids but they weren't comfortable doing it like that. Later, one of the parents showed me a video from DJ Carey where he states that it doesn't really matter which way you point the hurl. Opinions?!


Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 964 ✭✭✭eurokev


    Convention would usually mean the toe pointing out. However you'd see a few of kind of awkward guys doing it this way. Iv played with a few lads who used lift like this, and they tended to be a bit gifted in terms of skill and stick control, and could do things 'untrainable'

    I suppose it depends on the kid. If they are getting the ball up comfortably and naturally, it's not a problem, but if they are struggling and not as good with the skills, that's where you should be trying to instill and drill the conventional skills in to them. Just my opinion, best of luck


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 8,723 ✭✭✭nice_guy80


    if the toe points in, the player has to correct their grip on the hurley in order to hit the ball properly on their strong side

    99% of county players use the toe out
    more efficient
    easier to perform


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,315 ✭✭✭Frankie5Angels


    Agree with nice guy above - the toe must be turned in order for the hurler to strike, slows things down. Another thing, in my opinion: In the majority of cases when a player points the toe in, you'll notice he doesn't use the thumb to grip the hurl as you normally would. The thumb running down the shaft of the hurl gives you more control over the ball as you go for a pick up, particularly with one hand (u10s may well be using two for now). Loss of control can mean the ball is lifted further away from the player, resulting in another split second lost.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,298 ✭✭✭arctictree


    So here is what DJ thinks:



    From 2:10 he says:
    You often see two ways or rising the ball. I rise the ball with the toe of the hurl facing to the right. You often see people with the toe of the hurl faced to the left. It doesn't really matter, its whatever suits you.

    I'd be inclined to go with whatever the dodger says but its an interesting debate.....


  • Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators, Social & Fun Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 12,803 Mod ✭✭✭✭Keano


    Really like the way DJ encourages two hands. You see so many players trying it with one hand and it doesn't always work!


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 8,723 ✭✭✭nice_guy80


    So many players in DJs era had some bad habits, yet they got away with it

    Whereas in the modern game with better coaching, video analysis and the speed of the game any knacks or flaws are very quickly exposed


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,149 ✭✭✭big_drive


    Toe out in my opinion as the hurley is then in the ready position to strike. With toe in you have to change grip and turn the hurley to strike, this may only take a split second but that enough to be hooked or blocked in a game as fast as hurling


  • Registered Users Posts: 258 ✭✭krazyklown


    Good debate - I think the physics side of things suggests toe out but like a previous poster points out, a gifted hurler will be able to do it either way. I wouldn't force any young lad into one way or another. Correct them a couple of times and leave them be after that, no point chastising them as they will only rebel!

    I once started a debate with a couple of coaches i knew that a one handed pick was more efficient and less awkward than the two handed pick. I know thats a controversial stance for a coach, but my own experience is that a two handed pick seriously hampers your own agility as you move into the pick. It also commits you so, if the ball bounces sideways, its difficult to readjust. Whereas with a one handed pick, there is less bending and its easier to flow into the pick, and importantly, pick up speed after the pick is executed. Very, very few senior intercounty hurler pick with two hands. Then again, the same argument with regard to talented players being naturally competent with either strategy.


  • Registered Users Posts: 96 ✭✭cowboyjoe


    I would recommend them to do whatever they feel comfortable with! As a player I agree with what is mentioned above, most older players of a decent standard will jab lift with the toe pointing right. You then have the correct grip to strike on your strong side. However, as a coach of kids you don't want to be overly negative or critical. I would explain the toe right is the way most inter county players lift the ball, try see if you can practice that way at home, but them being there and involved is the most important point. Most hurlers correct little technical skills like this as they grow and develop so it is not a huge issue, IMHO.


  • Registered Users Posts: 258 ✭✭paul0103


    I think because they are so young it would be better to try and get into the habit of having the toe out.

    When I was about the same age or maybe even a little younger I remember a friend of my Dad's was visiting the house. I was pucking the ball against the wall while he was there. He noticed I was picking the ball up the 'wrong' way (toe in). He explained how it meant I would need to turn the hurley as I struck the ball. Grabbed a permanent marker from his jeep and drew a huge smiley face on one side of the bás of the hurley that should be looking at me if I'm picking the ball up correctly. Did the trick for me anyway!


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  • Registered Users Posts: 135 ✭✭bodun


    The toe should always be out. As stated above you can get away with it pointing in but think of this example, you jab lift with the toe pointing in and continue with the ball on the hurl without taking it in the hand, then try and strike from the hurl, you will need to turn the hurl in your hand while doing this which is very awkward.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,295 ✭✭✭Martin567


    bodun wrote: »
    The toe should always be out. As stated above you can get away with it pointing in but think of this example, you jab lift with the toe pointing in and continue with the ball on the hurl without taking it in the hand, then try and strike from the hurl, you will need to turn the hurl in your hand while doing this which is very awkward.


    Wouldn't that depend on which direction you are running?


    In the example you give above, what you say would be true for a right handed player running towards goal and striking first time from the hurl. But a right handed player could also be running across field from right to left and planning to strike from the left side. With the toe of the hurley pointing out, they would then need to turn the hurley in their hand in order to strike!


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 786 ✭✭✭TheNap


    I like the way it's assumed everybody is right sided and not left


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 8,723 ✭✭✭nice_guy80


    TheNap wrote: »
    I like the way it's assumed everybody is right sided and not left

    doesn't matter what hand you use

    you still turn the toe out


  • Registered Users Posts: 303 ✭✭Smith614


    Get a young player to strike a sliotar then take it back to the jab lift position and the hurley should be turned the correct way. Toe out.


  • Registered Users Posts: 268 ✭✭Twiceasnice97


    arctictree wrote: »
    So here is what DJ thinks:



    From 2:10 he says:



    I'd be inclined to go with whatever the dodger says but its an interesting debate.....

    truly great player but he is wrong on this one and its interesting that he holds it correctly himself
    the intercounty game is the proof of it

    the correct way to hold a hurley is dominant hand on top catching hand closer to the bas and the toe turned out.

    lots of children do it in many different ways and you often come up against the argument that it doesn't matter.

    If it didn't matter intercounty hurling would be full of players who do it the wrong way but it is not.

    that is absolute proof that those things cause you problems as you develop

    allowing a child to do it incorrectly is reducing their ability to fulfil their potential


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,900 ✭✭✭granturismo


    Toe out also gives a minute time advantage when taking a free. Having the toe in for free taking requires an additional small adjustment of the hurl angle to strike the sliotar. I cant remember where I saw this - possibly in one of the GAA skills videos if theyre still avaliable.

    I'd encourage them to jab lift with the toe out. I'd also encourage the helpful parent to help out as a mentor and see how difficult it is to get twenty 10 year olds to do a drill and skill at the same time and using the same technique.


  • Registered Users Posts: 745 ✭✭✭MattressRick


    Hi I know this thread is open since 2016 but is there a recommended age group to introduce the jab lift?

    I'm thinking U6 is too young for it?

    Thanks.



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,597 ✭✭✭joebloggs32


    U6s should be just playing with the first touch sliotar which is an oversized ball so I wouldn't be trying to get them rising the ball. Its too big to try and catch.

    Just foucus on them gripping the hurl right and learning to strike on the ground, and spend a lot of time on movement like chase games, hopping, skipping and just having fun.



  • Registered Users Posts: 745 ✭✭✭MattressRick


    Thanks for that. Good to know. Had that inkling alright.



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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,167 ✭✭✭crusd


    If your U6's are eager and show promise its no harm to give a few pointers. Let them practice at home. Having said that the one's who show some promise at that age are likely those getting home coaching from a parent or learning from and older sibling so dont need the help.

    The biggest issue I find with the U8's is getting them to get the hurl low enough to the ground. The other challenge is trying to learn enough yourself to teach them when you only ever played football



  • Registered Users Posts: 745 ✭✭✭MattressRick


    Thanks for that. Yeah there's a bit of mechanics in the lift with the need to get low to the ground and move the hurl very quickly.



  • Registered Users Posts: 848 ✭✭✭Deskjockey


    One thing I did when coaching u6s a few years ago was to get them to practise the roll lift (in particular)and the jab lift while kneeling on the ground. It takes out some of the variables (of the rest of their body moving) and all of them could do it, even the lads whose coordination wasn't quite there yet.



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