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Extreme High Temperatures

  • 28-05-2016 8:40pm
    #1
    Closed Accounts Posts: 625 130Kph


    It was warm enough during the week in Ouargla (Algeria) - 46C according to this :eek:.

    I’ve long had a fascination with the highest temperatures recorded in certain regions of the globe.

    The highest temps I’ve experienced was 2 to 3 weeks of over 35C in a Boston heatwave (36C to 38C at the maximum).

    People in India, Pakistan, the Gulf states, the Sahara and such places seem to take pride in withstanding all that the extreme heat throws at them. But at some point even they admit it is intolerable.

    What’s the threshold temp for being able to get a night’s sleep without air-conditioning?

    Would you like to live or holiday in regions where temps of 45C to 56C are frequent?

    What are your thoughts or experiences on these hot regions?


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Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 6,675 ✭✭✭ ronnie3585


    I was in Athens a couple of years ago and the highest temperature was 43 degrees. It was fooking horrible, especially being stuck in the middle of a concrete jungle. It was a case of running from one air conditioned building to the next. Even 10 minutes in the sun would leave you a sweaty mess!

    I read they hit 51 degrees in northern India last week, it must have been unbearable.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,809 ✭✭✭ Speedwell


    It was 50 for a few days when I was last in Abu Dhabi to train some engineers out there. It was actually much more bearable than 40 degrees back in humid Gulf Coast Texas where the sun beats on you. I actually went and took a leisurely walk in the area around my hotel one day and it felt rather like being in a hot tub. The next day I had booked a tour of the Sheikh Zayed mosque, and I wore what I thought would be modest enough clothing, a pair of long plain loose black trousers and a tunic top with a modest neck and long sleeves. At the door they issued me a black robe and black headscarf, which I had to wear over my clothes. The mosque was not air-conditioned and a lot of the tour involved standing outside. I was soaking wet when I got back to the hotel, but it surprisingly wasn't as bad as I had feared.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 625 130Kph


    Speedwell wrote: »
    It was 50 for a few days when I was last in Abu Dhabi to train some engineers out there. It was actually much more bearable than 40 degrees back in humid Gulf Coast Texas where the sun beats on you...
    I shared a house once with a fella from Belarus and during a -10C cold snap (in England), he said it was brutal cold. He said it felt much worse than say, a not uncommon -25C in Belarus in winter time.

    So I guessed one of the components that changes how people feel extreme temps is the ocean versus mid-continental influence.
    ronnie3585 wrote: »
    I was in Athens a couple of years ago and the highest temperature was 43 degrees...
    This is what I was getting at – visiting is one thing but imagine trying to work –either physical or mental – in that cauldron for weeks at a time…it sounds hellish!!

    Power cuts are common in India too which makes it even worse.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,441 ✭✭✭ 17-pdr


    130Kph wrote: »
    I shared a house once with a fella from Belarus and during a -10C cold snap (in England), he said it was brutal cold. He said it felt much worse than say, a not uncommon -25C in Belarus in winter time.

    So I guessed one of the components that changes how people feel extreme temps is the ocean versus mid-continental influence.

    Humidity is the killer. Ditto Canadians. Any I've spoken to detest our winters when they are cold & damp. They thought when it was 1 or 2c here plus dampness was worse than minus 15 or so back home with low humidity.


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 334 ✭✭ skywanderer


    I experienced 48c in Las Vegas out in the Mojave a few years ago which was a dry heat, then a few years later I experienced 49c in Abu Dhabi both times in July. Abu Dhabi had very high humidity at the time which was very difficult. I have travelled quite alot around the world and one of the most uncomfortable was recently on a trip to the Philippines in the middle of the hot season and the heat index soared to 52c, the effect of clouds of Diesel smoke and the concrete jungle effect was the worst for me. On the flip side the big freeze up on 2010 here was the coldest with I measuring -19c on the car on the side of a mountain here at considerable altitude. I'll take the freezing cold over the heat anyday however.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 16,689 ✭✭✭✭ silverharp


    Southern Germany is getting it rough in parts at the moment

    A belief in gender identity involves a level of faith as there is nothing tangible to prove its existence which, as something divorced from the physical body, is similar to the idea of a soul. - Colette Colfer



  • Registered Users Posts: 983 ✭✭✭ MrDerp


    I lived in Southern California for a while, in an area of paved over desert. There was regularly 10-15 days of 100-108F so 38-42 range, and a couple of days it might have hit 43. A day or two here or there is ok, but that's punishing heat over a couple of weeks. You are constantly switching between air conditioned buildings/cars and extreme heat. It played havoc with my digestive system to the point that I stopped eating lunch and often breakfast. I'd snack on small bits through the day, but built around a single meal in the evening when it was cooler. Even at that, if I ate out, I would probably expell quite urgently within an hour or two. I wouldn't move there, or hotter parts of Australia, or to the Middle East permanently for this reason, even if everyone was complementing me on how slim I looked :P.

    It's all relative though. I was working in London during a heatwave last summer - there were regular days of up to 30 degrees but the heat in the city, and especially the tube, was oppressive although the evenings were very pleasant. I've also been to Florida a couple of times, and 30 C there with high humidity is pretty awful. I'd have taken dry heat in California at 40 degrees over London/Florida at 30 degrees any day.

    The hottest temperatures I've experienced was 46 degrees in Furnace Creek (in Death Valley). 40+ is routine May to September there, and the heat was oppressive but we were only passing through and stopped for a couple of hours. You're 200ft below sea level there. Again, fine to visit but not to live in.

    If you're ever looking for extreme differences, you can drive from Death Valley to the Tioga Pass in the Sierra nevadas in about 4 hours. It's an amazing drive and you can go from 40+ in death valley to below zero, and from -200ft to 9800ft in elevation in half a day. The pass is closed in winter (it connects with the Yosemite area) but if you catch it just after it opens (usually May/June) you'll be standing in your shorts looking at frozen lakes and snow, within hours of baking in death valley.


  • Moderators, Home & Garden Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators Posts: 16,111 Mod ✭✭✭✭ DOCARCH


    silverharp wrote: »
    Southern Germany is getting it rough in parts at the moment

    The first part of that video is scary! I wouldn't like to be on the upper floors of some of those houses/buildings with cars and vans crashing into the ground floor walls!


  • Registered Users Posts: 16,689 ✭✭✭✭ silverharp


    DOCARCH wrote: »
    The first part of that video is scary! I wouldn't like to be on the upper floors of some of those houses/buildings with cars and vans crashing into the ground floor walls!

    indeed, Im surprised it isn't getting any coverage , it looks terrible

    A belief in gender identity involves a level of faith as there is nothing tangible to prove its existence which, as something divorced from the physical body, is similar to the idea of a soul. - Colette Colfer



  • Registered Users Posts: 616 ✭✭✭ macnug


    Worst I've experienced was 40c we were just sitting by the pool and my arms were sweating!! Never experienced that at rest before.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 12,557 ✭✭✭✭ sryanbruen


    Worst I experienced was 36c in Lanzarote of August 2014.

    Weather and climate site - https://www.ukandirelandclimate.com/ (advised to view on PC, not optimised for mobile)

    Photography site - https://www.sryanbruenphoto.com/



  • Registered Users Posts: 2,930 ✭✭✭ xabi


    Spent a week of 40+ in Oz, one night the low was 35, no air con, slept on a tiled floor to keep cool.


  • Registered Users Posts: 12,557 ✭✭✭✭ sryanbruen


    xabi wrote: »
    Spent a week of 40+ in Oz, one night the low was 35, no air con, slept on a tiled floor to keep cool.

    Oh god :eek:

    Weather and climate site - https://www.ukandirelandclimate.com/ (advised to view on PC, not optimised for mobile)

    Photography site - https://www.sryanbruenphoto.com/



  • Registered Users Posts: 288 ✭✭ Buttros


    Was in Dubai last June for a few days. Was during Ramadan as well. Was 50c in the middle of the day and the roof top pool's juice bar was closed for the month. Even in my hotel (Sheraton) you couldn't really drink water in public. Had to go down to your room or go to the purpose areas hidden behind curtains (at the ground floor restaurant). Couldn't walk far in the heat or you'd be dripping in sweat. Air-Conditioned Shopping centers or the like were the order of the day.


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 1,141 Stealthfins


    My car clocked 29° in the carpark today....


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,477 ✭✭✭ Comhrá


    I spent two weeks in Tucson, Arizona a few years back in August. 40-42C most days and it was the Monsoon season there, so massive humidity and heavy-duty thunderstorms most days which were spectacular, but the midday temp/humidity was very hard to tolerate.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 6,226 ✭✭✭ pablo128


    42°c in Benalmadena last year. It was hard going at times.


  • Registered Users Posts: 627 ✭✭✭ JeffK88


    Same as above poster 42c last year in Nerja. Kind of heat that makes you sleepy.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,299 ✭✭✭ LeBash


    Had 40 c in New Mexico a couple of years ago. The air was so dry my nose kept bleeding. Couldnt move with the heat. One of the locals told me to drink lots of warm drinks and take loads of salt. Helped but like above, give me 40 below rather than 40 above.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,240 ✭✭✭ Jimbob1977


    I spent a summer in Chicago. The temperature would regularly hit 33c (91f). However, the killer was humidity. It is murderous. Sweat would pour out after five seconds outside.

    Other notables.....


    o Death Valley at sunset was 35c (95f). Great experience. Like being in a dry oven. I can only imagine when it hits 50c


    o Las Vegas at 44c (111f). It wasn't that bad as the humidity was low. Perfectly able to walk the streets


    o Niger in West Africa was about 37c (100f). Sahara desert heat. Dry.


    o Stockholm at -9c. It was a dry cold. Shuddered the bones for a day. After that... It felt like a cold Dublin -2c. Relatively easy to acclimatise


    o The top of Haleakala on Maui. Never felt windchill like it. While it's a tropical island, Haleakala is almost 3,000 metres at dawn. -2c felt like -20c in gusty conditions.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 366 ✭✭ madanall


    I have experienced extremely hot temperatures in Australia, USA and parts of Europe. But the one occasion that springs to mind was 2 weeks I spent in Tunisia. It hit 44c over a 5 day period. 4 workers in neighbouring hotels died from the heat over those few days.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,852 ✭✭✭ pauldry


    Was 46c in vegas in May 2005 for a whole week. Got down to 42c the day we left. One night it was 34c . It even rained lightly one day but it was so hot it evaporated before it hit the ground. Never saw anthin like it.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,405 ✭✭✭ Danno


    54c in Ireland during the hottest summer day 1995. I was in a glasshouse. It was almost 32c outside and remember going from 54c to 32c and breaking out in goosebumps from the temperature drop!


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 334 ✭✭ skywanderer


    Danno wrote: »
    54c in Ireland during the hottest summer day 1995. I was in a glasshouse. It was almost 32c outside and remember going from 54c to 32c and breaking out in goosebumps from the temperature drop!

    I guess everything growing in the glasshouse died? 1995 was a brilliant summer only 2013 matched it for me.


  • Registered Users Posts: 182 ✭✭ Disgruntled Badger


    Hottest was in the UAE, 48 degrees. Couldn't stand out in it for even a second. The actual worst to bear was Malaysia where it was cooler, like mid 30s, but really intense humidity.

    Coldest was north of Finland. -36. oddly enough once you are moving about and dressed in winter gear it's actually quite pleasant. -2 on a wet winter's night in Donegal is far less bearable.


  • Moderators, Technology & Internet Moderators Posts: 17,098 Mod ✭✭✭✭ cherryghost


    Great memories of 1995...

    In August 2012 I believe, I was in Spain, temps were regularly in the mid 40's and the humidity was a bitch. Spent most of the time indoors... I remember someone died of heat stroke down the road too iirc.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 2,989 ✭✭✭ jacksie66


    This post has been deleted.


  • Registered Users Posts: 19,564 ✭✭✭✭ Rikand


    Went on our Honeymoon in September 2012 to Vegas and San Diego.

    In Vegas it was 40 degrees pretty much everyday. Thank God for the hotel pool

    We rented a car and took the scenic route to San Diego Via Death Valley and experienced a very disappointing 41 degrees by way of the cars temperature gauge but we were looking forward to some nice cool temperatures in San Diego.

    Over 30 degrees every day and the humidity was 90%. The Santa Ana winds killed us. The heat coming from the interior was so intense. The hottest day of all hit 39 degrees and it was actually one of the coolest feeling days of the week as humidity dropped to zero.


    I'd normally be the sort of person that would love extreme heat, but extreme heat with low humidity please :)


  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators Posts: 15,179 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Gonzo


    43C in Fuengirola back in the 90s and 28C at night with no air conditioning in the apartment for a month, had many a sleepless night.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 68,333 ✭✭✭✭ seamus


    Late 30s in Vegas during our honeymoon. Like others say here, it's a dry heat that's totally different to what we get over here. It's the difference between a grill and an oven - in Vegas once you were in out of the sunlight, it was pretty much OK. Even using the pool it was possible to walk around and lie down beside it without feeling like you're going to die.

    By contrast I always found high-20s in the Costa Del Sol really oppressive regardless of whether you were in the shade.


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