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World of Sport

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  • Registered Users Posts: 9,672 ✭✭✭Oblomov


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  • Registered Users Posts: 17,819 ✭✭✭✭peasant


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  • Registered Users Posts: 5,467 ✭✭✭valoren


    Tiger 40 today.


  • Registered Users Posts: 9,672 ✭✭✭Oblomov


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    At the 2015 European Championships in Dordrecht, Netherlands Christie claimed her first overall European title after winning gold in the 500m and 1500m and finishing second in the 3000m super final


  • Registered Users Posts: 48,742 ✭✭✭✭Wichita Lineman


    Escape-To-Victory.jpg

    Cheesy movie but who wouldn't like to have played on this team? Love the jerseys.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 9,672 ✭✭✭Oblomov


    ROFL

    That wasn't sport, that was a movie.


  • Moderators, Computer Games Moderators, Social & Fun Moderators Posts: 8,573 Mod ✭✭✭✭Wilberto


    I've always fell for this moment (well, when I saw it later in life anyway as I was quite young at the time so I missed it live!).

    Derek Redmond, a British 400m medal favourite, was visibly distraught after tearing his hamstring not long into the race and crouched to his haunches. He got back up moments later and limped about 100m when his father broke onto the track to all but carry him over the line. Another one of those, "It's the taking part/finishing that matters" stories.

    JohnFicara4930332177.jpg


  • Moderators, Computer Games Moderators, Social & Fun Moderators Posts: 8,573 Mod ✭✭✭✭Wilberto


    Munster, 1978. Need I say more?

    SeamusDennison1978_large.jpg?width=648&s=ie-362232

    Munster.png


  • Registered Users Posts: 48,742 ✭✭✭✭Wichita Lineman


    Golfing legend Seve Ballesteros

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  • Registered Users Posts: 3,598 ✭✭✭lassykk


    Wilberto wrote: »
    I've always fell for this moment (well, when I saw it later in life anyway as I was quite young at the time so I missed it live!).

    Derek Redmond, a British 400m medal favourite, was visibly distraught after tearing his hamstring not long into the race and crouched to his haunches. He got back up moments later and limped about 100m when his father broke onto the track to all but carry him over the line. Another one of those, "It's the taking part/finishing that matters" stories.

    I remember welling up a bit when I saw this alright.

    Lots of great pics in this thread. The ones without an explanation can be a bit hard to appreciate though if you aren't into the sport in question!


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  • Registered Users Posts: 33,709 ✭✭✭✭Cantona's Collars


    OConnorGeorge_FullLength.jpg

    20 Years this year since Wexford last won an All Ireland,I was on The Hill that day.George O' Connor dropped to his knees in prayer after the final whistle.


  • Registered Users Posts: 17,300 ✭✭✭✭razorblunt


    Wilberto wrote: »
    I've always fell for this moment (well, when I saw it later in life anyway as I was quite young at the time so I missed it live!).

    Derek Redmond, a British 400m medal favourite, was visibly distraught after tearing his hamstring not long into the race and crouched to his haunches. He got back up moments later and limped about 100m when his father broke onto the track to all but carry him over the line. Another one of those, "It's the taking part/finishing that matters" stories.

    JohnFicara4930332177.jpg

    I like it too, but I remember folk were skeptical about the whole thing and said he pulled up knowing he wasn't anywhere near winning, doesn't make sense to me.

    On a similar theme, I never understood the anger directed at Sonia for Atlanta


    image.jpg


  • Registered Users Posts: 926 ✭✭✭Icaras


    Conor-McGregor.jpg

    He may be a loud, brash and arrogant but he back up his words with actions. 13 sec to beat a 10 year wold champion is phenomenal.

    The great Jesse Owens shat all over Aryan supremacists during the 1936 Olympics in Germany. He refused to give the Nazi salute and went onto win 4 gold, seriously píssing off a certain Mr. Hitler.

    From wikipedia (with two refs at the end): Later, on October 15, 1936 Owens repeated this allegation when he addressed an audience of African Americans at a Republican rally in Kansas City remarking that "Hitler didn't snub me – it was our president who snubbed me. The president didn't even send me a telegram."


  • Moderators, Sports Moderators, Regional Midwest Moderators Posts: 23,950 Mod ✭✭✭✭Clareman


    zerks wrote: »
    https://www.gaa.ie/content/images/news/wexford/OConnorGeorge_FullLength.jpg

    20 Years this year since Wexford last won an All Ireland,I was on The Hill that day.George O' Connor dropped to his knees in prayer after the final whistle.

    I meant to post that before, brilliant pic


  • Registered Users Posts: 48,742 ✭✭✭✭Wichita Lineman


    ronnie.png

    Harder to appreciate the significance so far on but Ronnie Delany's Olympic gold in Melbourne 1956 was a phenomenal achievement. Apparently it was relayed to an ecstatic Irish public only via radio.


  • Registered Users Posts: 9,672 ✭✭✭Oblomov


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  • Registered Users Posts: 48,742 ✭✭✭✭Wichita Lineman


    ^ I was watching that race on TV. Major event at the time.


  • Registered Users Posts: 9,672 ✭✭✭Oblomov


    The Zola Budd Mary Decker controversy.. Who stepped on who? Who closed in too soon?

    Then Zola Budd was disqualified .....


  • Registered Users Posts: 7,776 ✭✭✭Big Pussy Bonpensiero


    It'd be great if people can give a little background to their picture, even if it is apparently obvious.


  • Registered Users Posts: 9,672 ✭✭✭Oblomov


    It'd be great if people can give a little background to their picture, even if it is apparently obvious.

    The whole Zola Budd Episode in sport is .... complicated, involved and best to read the wiki page... A victim of the British press, The Daily Mail, inexperienced and too young for international athletics???.... But, her Junior records still hold and Zola Budd did win two gold medals. for her distance.


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zola_Budd


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  • Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 7,176 Mod ✭✭✭✭cdeb


    If we'll allow a chess picture without a "Chess is/isn't a sport debate"...

    fischer24-spassky.jpg

    The match controller stopping world champion Boris Spassky's clock in the second game of his title match against Bobby Fischer in Iceland in 1972. Fischer had locked himself in his hotel room in protest (largely considered a nonsense protest) at noise from TV cameras in the room and never showed up for the game.

    At the time, Fischer was one of the most dominant people in any sport ever. But now people wondered if he was mentally unprepared for the match (which was best of 24 games) or if he had any chance of winning. That's if he even turned up for the next game. He did, won it, won four more in quick succession and in due course won the title.

    It's hard to overstate how huge an event the match was - USA v USSR at the height of the Cold War. It was the Match of the Century, the first chess match ever broadcast live on TV. It made the front page of Time magazine and the Irish Times. In Ireland, the number people playing the game doubled almost overnight - the Leinster Leagues went from 5 divisions to 12 in the space of a couple of years. New tournaments and clubs were created everywhere, many of which are still going strong today. The whole game here was overhauled because of Fischer v Spassky; arguably the strongest weekend tournament in the world is in Ireland now. I'm sure other countries have similar stories.

    Fischer never played again, except for a rematch with Spassky 20 years later, when Spassky was still in the world's top 100. Fischer won handily enough.


  • Registered Users Posts: 9,672 ✭✭✭Oblomov


    The first Olympiad was unofficial. For the 1924 Olympics an attempt was made to include chess in the Olympic Games but this failed because of problems with distinguishing between amateur and professional players.[1] While the 1924 Summer Olympics was taking place in Paris, the 1st unofficial Chess Olympiad also took place in Paris. FIDE was formed on Sunday, July 20, 1924, the closing day of the 1st unofficial Chess Olympiad.[2]
    FIDE organised the first Official Olympiad in 1927 which took place in London.[1] The Olympiads were occasionally held annually and at irregular intervals until World War II; since 1950 they have been held regularly every two years.

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    There were 16 participating nations in the 1st Chess Olympiad, 1927. By the 41st Olympiad, 2014, there were 172 participating nations.

    A group of chess enthusiasts had checked into a hotel, and were standing in the lobby discussing their recent tournament victories. After about an hour, the manager came out of the office and asked them to disperse.

    "But why?" they asked, as they moved off.

    "Because," he said, "I can't stand chess nuts boasting in an open foyer."


  • Registered Users Posts: 48,742 ✭✭✭✭Wichita Lineman


    As a keen golfer I am delighted golf is included at the 2016 Olympics in Rio.

    3fb18f85b58e810ea43e35b14178ca38.jpg

    Canadian George Lyon, above, was the last Olympic gold medal winner in golf at the 1904 St. Louis games. AP Photo.


  • Registered Users Posts: 9,672 ✭✭✭Oblomov


    U6940P6DT20150121114237.jpg

    Lee Trevino played a miraculous round of golf in 1972, beating Nicklaus and Jacklin to win the British Open at Muirhead.

    and, it's beautiful to watch

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=urdUwammrEM

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  • Registered Users Posts: 48,742 ✭✭✭✭Wichita Lineman


    On this day back in 1967 - Donald Campbell died a split second before breaking his own water speed record in his jet-powered boat, the Bluebird K7.

    k7flip.jpg


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,190 ✭✭✭Andrewf20


    The last F1 race on the original spa francorchamps circuit in 1970 at the fearsome downhill flat out burnenville corner. The circuit was over 8 miles long over public roads, where average speeds reach >160mph.

    1424955264.jpg

    From wiki:

    "Spa was the fastest road circuit in Europe at the time, and it had a nasty reputation for being dangerous and very fast- it was a circuit known to be one for the brave, and most drivers were frightened of it. Entries in the F1 and sportscar races there were often smaller than usual compared to other circuits."

    "The old Spa circuit was unique in that speeds were consistently high with hardly any let-up at all for 3–4 minutes. This made it an extraordinarily difficult mental challenge, because most of the corners were taken at 180+ mph and were not quite flat- every corner was as important as the one before it."

    "The lap record of the old triangle-shaped track is 3 minutes and 13.4 seconds, held by the French driver Henri Pescarolo, driving a Matra at the 1973 Spa 1000 km World Sportscar Championship race at an average speed of 262 kilometres per hour (163 mph)
    "

    " [Jackie] Stewart later compared the old Spa circuit in 1986 as being as ferocious as a tiger, and he later described Masta in an interview in 2011 as perhaps the hardest corner on any racetrack he raced on in his career."


  • Registered Users Posts: 13,186 ✭✭✭✭jmayo


    I think Stewart had reason to hate Spa after his 1966 crash in the BRM left him trapped in a car with broken ribs and fuel leaking all over him.
    No fire marshalls around either.

    stewarts-wreck.jpg

    He led the charge for F1 safety and wasn't really appreciated enough by fellow drivers for it.

    BTW Jimmy Clark detested Spa after the 1960 crashes that killed Alan Stacey & Chris Bristow at the Burnenville Corner.
    This picture shows one of the main hazards of the Burnenville corner. On the outside of the corner, there was a drop of about 12 feet, which was there due to someone’s house and driveway having the audacity to be in the way. Picture is from the 1966 race, with Jo Bonnier’s Cooper dangling over the edge. He was uninjured.

    rsz_1966_belgian_gp_-_jbonniers_cooper_on_the_edge-2.jpg

    I am not allowed discuss …



  • Registered Users Posts: 3,190 ✭✭✭Andrewf20


    Theres a great BBC4 documentary called "Grand Prix - The killer years" with shows alot of this and more:

    http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x14el38_grand-prix-the-killer-years-do


  • Registered Users Posts: 9,672 ✭✭✭Oblomov


    At the finish, Ford decided to stage publicity photo between Miles/Hulme and McLaren/Amon with the No. 5 following, too. According to witnesses, McLaren left a small margin to Miles and it was expected than Miles/Hulme will be declared winner after the examination of the photo finish. But the ACO declared the McLaren/Amon car had won the race, having covered more distance in 24 hours, as it had started the race several places behind the Miles/Hulme car. The ACO estimated the difference to 8 meters. This was a terrible disappointment for Ken Miles, who expected the triple crown Daytona-Sebring-Le Mans as a reward for his investment in the GT40 development. The finish remains the closest in Le Mans history.

    LeMans1966-finish1.jpeg


    The Ken Miles/ Denny Hulme car had led for ost of the race and was told to slow to allow the McLaren/Amon car to catch up. Ken Mikes was employed by Ford as the developement Engineer and had virtually built the GT40 mkll

    Rimoured has it that Dan Gurney at one of the LeMans starts, requiring the drivers to run across the track, got one foot caught in the steeering wheel. Gurney's car had a "dimple" in the door to allow Gurney to sit upright. He was too rall for the car.

    65873497.jpg?format=300w


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  • Registered Users Posts: 9,672 ✭✭✭Oblomov


    When we talk of the all-time greats in Formula 1, we talk about Juan Manuel Fangio, about Ayrton Senna and Alain Prost, and about Michael Schumacher. Indeed, their greatness cannot be doubted. because each of them knew a thing or two about driving in their respective eras.

    Fangio raced in the 50s, when racing cars were unreliable contraptions, which could reach 200 km/hr, then could break down at any time and kill you. Senna and Prost were associated with the mid 80s-mid 90s - which was possibly the most competitive era of motor racing, when turbo charged engines and driver aids produced some of the most technologically advanced cars of all time. Schumacher drove in the recent past, and broke almost every record that had been set before him.

    However, there is yet another driver who could well lay stake to being one of the greatest of all times - only had destiny had been a bit forgiving.

    After Stirling Moss, Jim Clark was the pride of British motorsports in the 60s. The Times put him at number 1 in the list of greatest racing drivers of all time, ahead of the aforementioned mavericks. It wasn't an exaggeration, because when he died in a Formula 2 crash at Germany, he had won more races and scored more pole positions than any other driver before him.

    The Italian Grand Prix of 1967 is considered to be one of his most spectacular races.

    The circuit at Monza has always been associated with sheer speed, and if there was one single grand prix which was a display of such eye-watering speed it was none other than Clark's in 1967.

    Clark, driving for Lotus-Ford had scored pole position, with a time of 1:28.5. He was leading the race and was well on his way to scalp yet another win, but mid-way through the race - disaster struck in the form of a tyre puncture. In the pit-stop that followed, he lost one whole lap, and dropped to 16th place.

    All hopes seemed shattered for the 31 year old Briton, which was when he decided to do something quite surrealistic. He tore through Monza's 'Temple of Speed', and systematically destroyed the competition. The fastest-lap time plummeted with every lap that Clark completed, till he went fast enough to set a fastest lap time which was equal to his qualifying pole time. Now when has that happened in Formula 1 before?

    But that wasn't it. In the second last lap, he unlapped himself by blasting past his arch-rival Jack Brabham and then past John Surtees' Honda and into the lead. The crowd around the circuit looked on in disbelief. Jim Clarke, had just gone past the race leader, after being a lap down and in 16th place some time back.

    However, Clark couldn't make it work till the end, as a faulty fuel pump problem in the last lap, made his car lose all engine power. Surtees and Brabham went past him and Clark coasted past the chequered flag in 3rd position.


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