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Garda 'who lost her ambition due to PTSD awarded €75,000

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  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 3,315 ✭✭✭mynamejeff


    thebaz wrote: »
    over the years , had a few digs , playing football, rugby , and when I used to drink , especially London 20 years ago , nearly every weekend there would be a punch up in the bar , nothing too serious

    Funny I play Gaa and rugby and i ve have a normal active social life over the last 15 or so years and Ive never been punched in the face.

    think there might be something about you that attracts punches ??


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 126 ✭✭Whyohwhy?


    Personally I think that assault would be considered an occupational hazard of being a garda, the fact they undergo defence and restraint training kinda proves that, I mean a cashier doesn't receive such training. I think it's a bit naive of some people think that it wouldn't be in that particular job tbh.

    As for this particular case... Whatever about the money(a bit high imo) but I do wonder whether she is back on the beat or doing desk work in after a diagnosis of Ptsd.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,456 ✭✭✭Icepick


    mynamejeff wrote: »
    30 or 35 years of working 10 hour days min 6 days on four days off.

    Finishing at 7 am and that counts as your off day.

    At the beck and call of the courts Judges an solicitors regardless of roosters.

    Basic unsuitable or flat out lack of equipment

    One of the smallest per capita in Europe (armed and unarmed )

    Lack of political support

    Lack of judicial support

    Near mathematical certainty that you will be assaulted at least twice during your term of employment

    Having 23 percent of you wage cut halfway through your contract while legally disqualified from taking part in the negotiations

    Dealing with Physically and mentally draining situations on a daily and weekly basis

    Sure they signed up for it right ?
    Yes, they have and a lot of these things are common in other jobs.
    And nobody is stopping them from changing their career.


  • Registered Users Posts: 13,659 ✭✭✭✭thebaz


    mynamejeff wrote: »
    Funny I play Gaa and rugby and i ve have a normal active social life over the last 15 or so years and Ive never been punched in the face.

    think there might be something about you that attracts punches ??

    who knows, but where I lived in London in the late 80's, weekend fights were sort of the norm - back then would hardly know anyone who hadn't been on the receiving end of a couple of punches playing rugby , it has cleaned up a lot since


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 1,393 ✭✭✭DarkyHughes


    Boom_Bap wrote: »
    I've updated it to include PTSD.

    Was the original title "Garda who felt sad gets 75 million for feeling a little sad" Lol


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  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 1,393 ✭✭✭DarkyHughes


    Eh?

    They are completely different scenarios. A cashier doesn't have to deal with criminals day to day. They might have to deal with a customer mouthing off every once in a while. It's called customer service and is part of their day to day job.

    Gardaí deal with criminals. There is a certain danger due to the nature of the job ffs.

    Edit: She also left counselling voluntarily. :rolleyes:

    If it's Tescos they probably deal with a lot more chavs.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,420 ✭✭✭esforum


    Icepick wrote: »
    No justification to retire at 50/55 still.

    You think a Garda thats 60 could realistically chase and tackle a strapping fit and healthy 20 or 25 year old criminal? The early age is a reflection of the demands made on the health of Gardai. You can retire after 20 years from the NYPD by the way.

    Icepick wrote: »
    And nobody is stopping them from changing their career.

    And whats stopping you from joining this easy, overpaid, cushy number? Thats the second time by the way I have asked that question, maybe you should just save what little credibility you have left and stop posting?


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,420 ✭✭✭esforum


    Whyohwhy? wrote: »
    Personally I think that assault would be considered an occupational hazard of being a garda, the fact they undergo defence and restraint training kinda proves that, I mean a cashier doesn't receive such training. I think it's a bit naive of some people think that it wouldn't be in that particular job tbh.

    Being an occupational hazard does not preclude someone from being compensated when injured, honestly why can people not read threads fully? That same comment has been said already and answered fully.
    thebaz wrote: »
    over the years , had a few digs , playing football, rugby , and when I used to drink , especially London 20 years ago , nearly every weekend there would be a punch up in the bar , nothing too serious

    You are aking yourself sound like a right scumbag. In all my years playing rugby I can count on one hand the amount of punches I got. Besides that, just because you enjoyed punchups doesnt mean sane people who like to avoid being punched shouldnt be entitled to compensation when it happens


  • Registered Users Posts: 13,659 ✭✭✭✭thebaz


    esforum wrote: »


    You are aking yourself sound like a right scumbag. In all my years playing rugby I can count on one hand the amount of punches I got. Besides that, just because you enjoyed punchups doesnt mean sane people who like to avoid being punched shouldnt be entitled to compensation when it happens

    I never said I enjoyed being punched, but it was a fact of life, particularly a member of Garda or defenes forces - and don't question my sanity - Dick


  • Moderators, Music Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 25,734 Mod ✭✭✭✭Boom_Bap


    MOD
    esforum & thebaz
    Please be civil to each other, attack the post not the poster is a mantra commonly spoken on boards.ie. Please try to abide by that and discuss the topic without insulting each other.


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,873 ✭✭✭melissak


    I don't know why some people on here think guards should be expecting to be punched in the face as part of their job description. She was injured at work. That is what workplace compensation is for. Whether she got too high an award is another matter and that is the judges issue, but she was entitled to bring the case imo.


  • Registered Users Posts: 28,789 ✭✭✭✭ScumLord


    melissak wrote: »
    I don't know why some people on here think guards should be expecting to be punched in the face as part of their job description.
    It's not that people think it's a part of her job, but it is one of the risks of her job. Just like truck drivers risk being in a road accident because of their job. They don't expect to crash, but accept it's a risk of their job and prepare for it by having insurance and a pack in the truck to use if and when an accident does happen.


  • Registered Users Posts: 505 ✭✭✭inocybe


    I don't understand why the state gives a cash bonus in this kind of case. She doesn't need to alter her house, or buy any special equipment. The only person responsible is the person that punched her, not the state.


  • Registered Users Posts: 28,789 ✭✭✭✭ScumLord


    inocybe wrote: »
    I don't understand why the state gives a cash bonus in this kind of case. She doesn't need to alter her house, or buy any special equipment. The only person responsible is the person that punched her, not the state.
    It's seems like this is just the process. It also seems like a horribly expensive and drawn out way of dealing with garda issues.

    I don't think it's been said where the state actually failed here. I'm guessing she was left alone when she shouldn't have been. I would have thought there are procedures when dealing with criminals like this and that one of the procedures would be that no guard is left in a vulnerable position.

    Even if the guard was a big horse of a man he shouldn't be in a position where he can be overpowered and trapped/left for dead. The guards should always have an air of intimidation where you wouldn't dare try anything with any individual guard because you know you'll be jumped on by the rest of them. The criminal shouldn't be able to think, I have a chance here, just get the better of this guard and I can escape.

    If that was a procedure and it's being constantly ignored because of staffing issues, then I could fully appreciate why she'd have lost confidence and has a sense of dread when it comes to her future career. It's one thing to get caught up in an unforeseen incident. It's another to believe it's more than likely going to happen again because the guarda management won't take proper precautions. There's accepting risk and then there's just recklessness.


  • Registered Users Posts: 13,659 ✭✭✭✭thebaz


    melissak wrote: »
    I don't know why some people on here think guards should be expecting to be punched in the face as part of their job description. She was injured at work.

    in the same way if you join the armed forces, there is a chance you will get shot - no one wants it to happen but is part of the risk , but in Ireland someone is always culpable for any of lifes day to day woes , greedy ambulance chasers too many


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,456 ✭✭✭Icepick


    esforum wrote: »
    You think a Garda thats 60 could realistically chase and tackle a strapping fit and healthy 20 or 25 year old criminal? The early age is a reflection of the demands made on the health of Gardai. You can retire after 20 years from the NYPD by the way.




    And whats stopping you from joining this easy, overpaid, cushy number? Thats the second time by the way I have asked that question, maybe you should just save what little credibility you have left and stop posting?
    The job is not any more demanding than many others that don't enjoy these perks. The early retirement is a legacy issue and outdated one as well.
    Re the second question, which you should have realized is stupid, when I see a problem, I want to fix it not join in.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,873 ✭✭✭melissak


    thebaz wrote: »
    in the same way if you join the armed forces, there is a chance you will get shot - no one wants it to happen but is part of the risk , but in Ireland someone is always culpable for any of lifes day to day woes , greedy ambulance chasers too many

    Do the families of army officers get compensation if they get shot?


  • Registered Users Posts: 13,034 ✭✭✭✭It wasn't me!


    melissak wrote: »
    Do the families of army officers get compensation if they get shot?

    Yes, we pay into a fund for it.


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 3,315 ✭✭✭mynamejeff


    Icepick wrote: »
    The job is not any more demanding than many others that don't enjoy these perks. The early retirement is a legacy issue and outdated one as well.
    Re the second question, which you should have realized is stupid, when I see a problem, I want to fix it not join in.

    How are you going to fix something when you dont understand the basics of the issue ?


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,873 ✭✭✭melissak


    Yes, we pay into a fund for it.

    Good. I'm glad there is provision made for the bereaved. Our society needs people to do dangerous jobs for common good , they risk their lives so people like me do not have to. I don't begrudge them that at all.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 3,522 ✭✭✭paleoperson


    Wait... you mean she was assaulted by a criminal? I had to check several times and look around to make sure I was really reading this properly.

    Hahahahaha... oh what a looney world we live in. I thought she was assaulted by a fellow police officer or something. God, a police officer gets attacked by a criminal while out on duty and gets €75,000 compensation for it. :pac:

    The idea of it.

    Wouldn't there be some sort of insurance or something for this sort of thing where a police officer is attacked? Surely that is the comeback that a garda should have, I mean surely it's an occupational hazard that you might get attacked at some point. What a joke.


  • Posts: 18,749 ✭✭✭✭ [Deleted User]


    I will say it again for those people who dont/ cant understand.
    bubblypop wrote: »
    She took a claim under the Garda Compensation Act.

    This is how gardai get compensated for workplace accidents/ injuries.
    The same as someone on a factory floor gets injured at work, there is insurance to cover them.

    It's not an ideal way of dealing with it, but that's the way it is.
    I'm sure the offender was dealt with through the court system.


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 3,315 ✭✭✭mynamejeff


    Wait... you mean she was assaulted by a criminal? I had to check several times and look around to make sure I was really reading this properly.

    Hahahahaha... oh what a looney world we live in. I thought she was assaulted by a fellow police officer or something. God, a police officer gets attacked by a criminal while out on duty and gets €75,000 compensation for it. :pac:

    The idea of it.

    Wouldn't there be some sort of insurance or something for this sort of thing where a police officer is attacked? Surely that is the comeback that a garda should have, I mean surely it's an occupational hazard that you might get attacked at some point. What a joke.

    Its a mad world . Almost as mad as supposing that some one who kicks a garda in the head would go to jail or at last suffer the imposition of a fine.

    Instead they are surprised to find them self before a criminal court

    O what a world

    http://www.irishexaminer.com/ireland/woman-spared-jail-for-fairly-ferocious-attack-on-female-garda-242536.html


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,456 ✭✭✭Icepick


    mynamejeff wrote: »
    How are you going to fix something when you dont understand the basics of the issue ?
    You haven't explained why these people should enjoy early retirement at all.


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 3,315 ✭✭✭mynamejeff


    Icepick wrote: »
    You haven't explained why these people should enjoy early retirement at all.

    I provided ten points for you to ponder.

    you made a nonsense comment about them being common to lots of professions.

    Im not trying to persuade you of anything the facts are as they are. your failure to understand that is of no concern of mine


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,420 ✭✭✭esforum


    Icepick wrote: »
    The job is not any more demanding than many others that don't enjoy these perks. The early retirement is a legacy issue and outdated one as well.
    Re the second question, which you should have realized is stupid, when I see a problem, I want to fix it not join in.

    name another job requiring the tackling of criminals and placing yourself between dangerous criminals and innocent persons?

    The early retirement for police and firemen is a GLOBAL allowance. Understand that? Its not Irish, its global. Its not just police, its occupations designated by people who know far far more about the subject than you.

    The second question is not silly, its pretty obvious you have no concrete arguement or evidence or in fact, information. You have been debunked numerous times now.

    Whats your job by the way? I may have some ideas how to fix it.
    thebaz wrote: »
    in the same way if you join the armed forces, there is a chance you will get shot - no one wants it to happen but is part of the risk , but in Ireland someone is always culpable for any of lifes day to day woes , greedy ambulance chasers too many

    so what is being said here is that from now on any risk in the big bad world means you can **** right off and just suffer in silence? The fact that assault is a crime, tough.

    car hits you as you cross at a green man? Well sure thats a risk of walking across the road

    electrocuted while doing from repairs on a house? Well your an electrician so tough

    hit by another driver? Sure isnt it a hazard of driving

    car or house broken into? Well thats a well known risk so ta hell with ya. Shouldnt have had nice stuff in the first place.

    I can go on but as I have done this more than once already. I get bored.
    ScumLord wrote: »
    It's not that people think it's a part of her job, but it is one of the risks of her job. Just like truck drivers risk being in a road accident because of their job. They don't expect to crash, but accept it's a risk of their job and prepare for it by having insurance and a pack in the truck to use if and when an accident does happen.

    what a load of rubbish, For starters, what pack should Gardai carry for broken noses? First aid kit is about it.

    Secondly, did you read the thread? did you see where its been explained multiple times that this was under the Garda compensation Act?

    last, are you seriously, seriously now, suggesting that people dont seek compensation from car crashes? really? What planet did you arrive from?

    Ther Gardai did not assault herself, she didnt run into a wall. She was assaulted by a third party and where this happens Gardai cannot sue the person but instead are compensated through the Garda compensation act.

    When someone smashes their car into you and you suffer injuries, their insurance pays you compensation.

    Understand? get it now?

    I patiently aweait the exact same silly comments and bad exampled which I will then copy and paste this post for the 5th time


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,420 ✭✭✭esforum


    inocybe wrote: »
    I don't understand why the state gives a cash bonus in this kind of case. She doesn't need to alter her house, or buy any special equipment. The only person responsible is the person that punched her, not the state.

    there ya go folks, compensation is a bonus now. thats the way people look at it, not long after we buried a Garda and were already back to this tripe


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 5,019 ✭✭✭ct5amr2ig1nfhp


    There is another thread going about the Garda awarded 35k compensation for ****e-gate.

    And there are posters here telling us that the Gardaí haven't become 'soft'?

    More tax payers money being wasted on ridiculous compensation claims.
    esforum wrote: »
    Explain, in what way are Gardai too soft?...


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,039 ✭✭✭B_Wayne


    There is another thread going about the Garda awarded 35k compensation for ****e-gate.

    And there are posters here telling us that the Gardaí haven't become 'soft'?

    More tax payers money being wasted on ridiculous compensation claims.

    The Garda suffered severe injuries and PTSD, even the US army compensates soldiers who suffer injuries both physical and psychological in the line of duty. This 'soft' phrase pretty much sums up this countries historically horrible attitude towards mental health issues.


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 5,019 ✭✭✭ct5amr2ig1nfhp


    Severe injuries? Hardly severe.

    I've broken my nose a number of times training of the years.

    PTSD is being thrown about lately, reminds me of ADHD.

    I guess you think the other Garda deserved her 35k for looking at some poop too? I can't imagine what she must be going through, :rolleyes:


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