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Royal Dublin Fusiliers - my humble collection

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  • #2


    George Edwin LARKIN (12.01.1897 – 11.02.1966)
    Lieutenant, 5th (Extra Reserve) Battalion
    Royal Dublin Fusiliers


    Entitled:
    - British War Medal
    - Victory Medal

    George was born 12th January 1897 as a son of accountant George Larking and Martha Larkin. George and Martha had three sons and a daughter. They lived “Olderille”, Sandymount Avenue, Ballsbridge, Dublin, Ireland.
    He studied in the High School of Dublin. During and straight after the war his own permanent address was given as 14 Upper Fitzwilliam Street, Dublin. His occupation of civil life was marked student and based on his age, he must been enlisted straight from the school. He was first appointed to the Inns of Court OTC on the 2nd September 1915. His started his service as a Private in No. 7 Officer Training Battalion, Inns of Court Officer Training Corps (O.T.C.) in the Curragh on 3rd July 1916. Quickly he was commissioned from the Officer’s Cadet Unit on the 25th October 1916.
    Following year he landed in Balkans 9th January 1917. He was first Assistant Transport Officer.
    Promoted to Lieutenant 25th April 1918 and worked in the Battalion as a Inteligence Officer (his papers do not show which battalion he was attached to). Confidential report states that his professional knowledge was very good, good disciplinarian, general knowledge, capacity for instruction and tact, very good and has also considerable powers as a leader.
    Lieutenant Larkin was demobilised 13th November 1919. Relinquish his commission 22nd July 1920.
    His brother Alfred Sloane served as well as an officer. First with the Army Service Corps and later in India (IARO). He staid in India and worked as a Commissioner in Indian Civil Service, Dacca Division, Bengal. . In 1944 he received Companion of the Order of the Indian Empire (CIE).
    Some reason George decided to leave from Ireland as well and on the 9th April 1923 he left to Kingston, Jamaica on board ship “Bayano” and became fruit farmer in there. Few months later his mother Martha Larkin applied his medals on the 22nd November 1923. Looks like he stayed in Jamaica until 30s. After that George Edwin Larkin married on 1930 with Dora Winifred Spence. They lived 25 Sandinghram Way, Moortown, Leeds.
    George died 11th February 1966 in Leeds, Yorkshire West Riding, England.

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  • #2


    Hello Looking for help please, my great grandfather was in the royal dublin fusiliers I have an image, is there anyway from looking at image that you would know what battallion he was in. Thanks in advance


  • #2


    If you have his service number then you can download his medal index card, from this it will have the medal roll entry numbers which can then be searched which should show which battalion/battalions he served with, all available on ancestry.

    Have a look here and it should give you an idea on where to look and what you may find available

    http://www.longlongtrail.co.uk/soldiers/how-to-research-a-soldier/


  • #2


    arnhem44 Thanks for your reply, on the right road, but very helpful.


  • #2


    Almost a VC...

    Francis Moore (1890 – May 1948) DCM
    10057, Private
    2 Battalion, Royal Dublin Fusiliers


    Francis was from Athy, Co.Kildare around 1890. He enlisted 16th March 1908 into the Royal Dublin Fusiliers and after initial training he was transferred into 2nd Battalion. 1911 Census lists him as a single with the 2nd Battalion in Tournay Barracks, Marlborough. He was just due to finish his 7 years full time service with the colours when things went horrible wrong in Europe. At least he was well trained by then – an advantage that later recruited service battalion soldiers didn’t had.

    When the Great War broke out, the 2nd Battalion was in Gravesend, part of 10th Brigade in 4th Division, commanded by Brigadier-General J.A.L. Halden C.B., D.S.O.
    2nd Battalion was sent as a part of British Expeditionary Force (BEF) to France, where they embarked on the 22nd August on the “S.S. Caledonia”. Most likely Frances was part of that patch because his Medal Index Card shows that he landed in France on the 23rd August 1914.

    Battalion found themselves in heavy battles immediately. They took part in the retreat following the Battle of Mons, taking part in their first engagement on 26th of August 1914 at Le Cateau that helped delay the German advance towards Paris, inflicting such heavy casualties that the Germans thought they faced more machine-guns than they actually did.
    But Battalion suffered many casualties and lots of them found themselves in the German hands and staid rest of the war in the POW camps mainly in Limburg.

    End of the next year Private Moore’s name appears on the wounded list that was published by the Cork Examiner on the 12th October 1915.

    248810178c65ed_o.jpg

    After recover he must been moved back to his previous unit. He continued to service but in the end of the war he must been got wounded badly so he was transferred first into Royal Irish Regiment Garrison Battalion for home service (number 2G/877) and then to the Labour Corps (number 329677). But before that, he was recommended for a VC for his action. Unfortunately this was downgraded to DCM. He received his award at Victoria Barracks in Belfast from Northern District Irish Command Brigadier-General Sir George William Hacket Pain KBE CB.

    24881013807748_o.jpg

    DCM citation:

    248810150e263b_o.jpg

    After demobilisation in 13th June 1918 his medals were sent to 5 St Johns Place, Athy, Co Kildare (also second address given was JJ Hospital, Blackrock).

    He applied clasp for his 1921 and also replacement medals 1926. I think the BWM that I have must be the duplicate because large font of the letter stamping.

    His health wasn’t probably good because 1930 his name appears again in the newspaper when he visited cinema in Dublin to see movie “Journey’s End”. He was part of 50 ex-soldiers group from Ministry of Pensions Surgical Hospital at Blackrock. He was only one who was separately named out there:

    24881019ad184e_o.jpg

    This movie was a set in the trenches near Saint-Quentin, Aisne, in 1918 towards the end of the First World War, Journey's End gives a glimpse into the experiences of the officers of a British Army infantry company in World War I. The entire story plays out in the officers' dugout over four days from 18 March 1918 to 21 March 1918, during the run-up to the real-life events of Operation Michael.

    Sadly Francis journey ended as well due to his health and he passed away 1948 in Manchester military hospital, only age of 58:

    248810234d7de2_o.jpg

    When his wife passed away 1977 once again his name as well appeared in the local newspaper:

    24881021ba71c4_o.jpg

    Here is his British War Medal. Medal suspender was removed and then fixed again. I have a bad feeling that his DCM may be melted down:

    24881011432d4e_l.jpg


  • #2


    My Great Great Grandfather Sgt Thomas Joseph Russell 14513, was killed on the 29/04/1916 in the Somme, still trying to gather more Info.
    B Coy 8th BN


  • #2


    Dear  Phaethon, I was blown away by your quality of research on individuals in the Royal Dublin Fusiliers. My Great Grandfather was in the 1st Battalion, service number 4242. Private Caddis Joyce. He was killed in the battle of Colenso. What I would like to ask is how did you get such detailed service records for other members of the Royal Dubs for soldiers serving around the same time (involved in 2nd Boer War)? You have records of movements, awards etc. Any advice greatly appreciated!


  • #2


    docchoc wrote:
    Dear Phaethon, I was blown away by your quality of research on individuals in the Royal Dublin Fusiliers. My Great Grandfather was in the 1st Battalion, service number 4242. Private Caddis Joyce. He was killed in the battle of Colenso. What I would like to ask is how did you get such detailed service records for other members of the Royal Dubs for soldiers serving around the same time (involved in 2nd Boer War)? You have records of movements, awards etc. Any advice greatly appreciated!


    Records of movement and Medal cards can be found at the National Archives at kew, use their website


  • #2


    Hi Phaeton. I was very impressed with your research into Patrick Babester. My Grandfather fought in the Great War having enlisted at the end of 1911. He was sent to France as part of the BEF. While there he received many wards including a DCM and Bar. He was injured twice, and was promoted to Compant Sergeant Major. He was in the 2nd RDF and the 1st RDF when they were amalgamated later in the war. He also lived in 21 Chamber Steet as did Patrick Babester and worked in the Guinness brewery after the war as well as P Babester. They obviously knew each other. It would be great to know how your got so much material on Patrick Babester. I would be very interested in talking to you.


  • #2


    Hi Phaeton. I was very impressed with your research into Patrick Babester. My Grandfather fought in the Great War having enlisted at the end of 1911. He was sent to France as part of the BEF. While there he received many wards including a DCM and Bar. He was injured twice, and was promoted to Compant Sergeant Major. He was in the 2nd RDF and the 1st RDF when they were amalgamated later in the war. He also lived in 21 Chamber Steet as did Patrick Babester and worked in the Guinness brewery after the war as well as P Babester. They obviously knew each other. It would be great to know how your got so much material on Patrick Babester. I would be very interested in talking to you.


    He doesn't respond, I've tried it before


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