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Things said in Ireland that no one says in England

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  • Seasan wrote: »
    Stephen's Day - Boxing Day


    See I don't get this. I know lots of people say the latter, have done my whole life. :confused:




  • being one, Karl would be better than most of the mangled oral atrocities visited upon my name when abroad or dealing with non local clients.

    Niamh is another name that they find difficult




  • The word "the" almost doesn't exist with the ordinary english person.

    "I'm going down pub"

    "Put bag down"

    "I am best"




  • mod9maple wrote: »
    See I don't get this. I know lots of people say the latter, have done my whole life. :confused:

    proddy!!! Get him :pac:




  • being one, Karl would be better than most of the mangled oral atrocities visited upon my name when abroad or dealing with non local clients.

    We eventually figured out how to get them to pronounce it correctly..many many years later like!
    Get them to say ALCOHOL and then drop the AL


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  • goz83 wrote: »
    proddy!!! Get him :pac:

    Har, har (and yes I know you're being facetious). :D Coming from Newry though, I do know quite a few of our British co-inhabitants on this fine isle of ours.

    But seriously, a lot of people use Boxing Day, myself included. And their 'cultural' background doesn't come into it. :)




  • Siobhan!!
    see o ban was how my mum first pronounced it. Poor woman makes bday cakes over here and it is essential for her to get the customers to spell out the name.

    and what's wrong with having just tea!




  • The first time I was in the Canaries I went into a shop with a plastic bag when this old woman came over to me and kept saying leaf the bag. I was thinking WTF does she want me to lift the bag for :confused: until I clicked she was trying to say leave the bag.




  • Go handy = Slow down




  • After dinner we have dessert, they have "pudding"

    When we feel like Sh!te, they feel "poorly"


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  • See o baann for Siobhán
    Eaowin for Eoin




  • What's a dead give away that your from Ireland when over there is saying "I'm grand"




  • Runners/takkies for trainers..and pants for trousers




  • Rubber-eraser.
    topper- sharpener.




  • sammyjo90 wrote: »
    Runners/takkies for trainers..and pants for trousers

    Also what we call Runners they say Trainers but they also call briefs / boxers pants we call them what they they are Jocks




  • A glass = A half

    We say => A glass of Guinness
    They say => A half a Guinness

    Nearly removed from a bar one time when I asked for a "pint and glass of Guinness", barman thought I was being smart asking for a " pint in a glass "




  • :) it's just down the road :)




  • Was over there recently Manchester area was visiting family they kept saying "would you like a drink" and i was saying it was a bit early n the day. But what they meant was would you have a cup of tea / coffee




  • bob50 wrote: »
    Was over there recently Manchester area was visiting family they kept saying "would you like a drink" and i was saying it was a bit early n the day. But what they meant was would you have a cup of tea / coffee

    And never a biscuit offered!!!




  • We say-Flogs.
    They say-flumps/marshmallows.


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  • feckin eejit




  • Scallions = Spring Onions

    I'm from England and I notice that everyone greets me here with the weather forecast... "Hello, Nice today isn't it" Or something along those lines.




  • Bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye bye




  • I almost fell of my seat at work the other day when I saw the pass word on a customers account was: Niamh (neeve) - obviously punter was fed up speaking to the office in Scotland and having to explain that one.

    Finally - press is the old English word for Cupboard it's interesting the way some old English words never fell out of the lexicon. Another example is ye - the plural version of you.




  • Nomis21 wrote: »
    Scallions = Spring Onions

    I'm from England and I notice that everyone greets me here with the weather forecast... "Hello, Nice today isn't it" Or something along those lines.
    What's the normal greeting in England?




  • deise08 wrote: »
    We say-Flogs.
    They say-flumps/marshmallows.
    Never heard of flogs in Ireland, what part are you from?




  • like the one with greeting someone with the weather. gas

    there we go, "gas" is another word we use.

    cathal on our site was actually pronounced 'cattle'

    odhran pronou rran




  • Sam Kade wrote: »
    What's the normal greeting in England?

    Ey up :pac:




  • Thanks a million. Most non-Irish have never heard this expression or what it means.


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  • also chatting to someone and you say 'your man or your one'. an english bloke was totally confused when I said "I was talking to yer one (yer man). he said, who is my man.


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