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Disposing of home heating oil

  • 12-07-2014 12:53pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 139 ✭✭ BIRDCAGE1


    Hi all,
    We converted over to gas last Summer from oil and I finally got around to emptying out the old oil tank, I got about 60L of kerosene from it ( now placed in 3 containers). Does anyone have any idea how I can get rid of it. I rang the local recycling centre and they will only take engine oil and not home heating oil.
    The kerosene itself looks a little darker in colour to the usual pinky type colour - I assume thats because its the end of the tank etc..

    Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated as I don't like the idea of having the oil sitting out in the back garden for long.

    cheers


Comments

  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 1,513 whupdedo


    Give it to someone you know that has oil as their main heat source, they can run it through gauze or a filter to clean it if theirs any dirt in it


  • Moderators, Home & Garden Moderators Posts: 5,554 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Wearb


    I wouldn't reuse it. €50 worth of oil for potentially €120 or lots more worth of damage. Most oil companies will allow you to throw it into their interceptors. Most local authorities also have ways of handling it. Try your old oil supplier first.

    Please follow site and charter rules. "Resistance is futile"



  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 1,513 whupdedo


    Not at all, run it through a tight knit gauze a couple of times to take out the impurities and you wouldn't have a bother


  • Moderators, Home & Garden Moderators Posts: 5,554 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Wearb


    whupdedo wrote: »
    Not at all, run it through a tight knit gauze a couple of times to take out the impurities and you wouldn't have a bother

    Anyone here who has serviced/ repaired a burner after dirty oil would not agree with you. But the op has two choices now and no one only him/herself to blame if it goes pear shaped.

    Please follow site and charter rules. "Resistance is futile"



  • Registered Users Posts: 3,784 ✭✭✭ jimf


    for the sake of 50eu not worth the risk tight knit gauze might catch the grit etc but what about the water that may or may not be mixed in as well


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  • Registered Users Posts: 139 ✭✭ BIRDCAGE1


    Thanks for all the suggestions guys. I think I'll give my old supply a call on Monday morning and see if they'll take it back.
    I don't really need the hassle of filtering it or anything like that at this stage I just need it gone as it's a fire hazard in the back garden.
    I'll see if any if my work collegues will take it aswell - they can filter it all the want if they so desire.


  • Registered Users Posts: 16,113 ✭✭✭✭ Sleeper12


    Not quite legal but any diesel engine will run very well on this.
    There is a reason it's coloured red. (red diesel) :)


  • Moderators, Home & Garden Moderators Posts: 5,554 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Wearb


    Sleeper12 wrote: »
    Not quite legal but any diesel engine will run very well on this.
    There is a reason it's coloured red. (red diesel) :)

    Certainly not "very well" and likely to void any warranty. Kerosene lacks the lubricating qualities of diesel and can strip the cylinders of the oil provided by the oil ports in the piston.

    Please follow site and charter rules. "Resistance is futile"



  • Registered Users Posts: 16,113 ✭✭✭✭ Sleeper12


    Wearb wrote: »
    Certainly not "very well" and likely to void any warranty. Kerosene lacks the lubricating qualities of diesel and can strip the cylinders of the oil provided by the oil ports in the piston.

    And yet any cold country would use this in their cars in the winter.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,471 ✭✭✭ Odelay


    Sleeper12 wrote: »
    Not quite legal but any diesel engine will run very well on this.
    There is a reason it's coloured red. (red diesel) :)

    It is not red diesel. DO NOT use it in your car.

    Red lemonade is also red, that doesn't mean it's the same as kerosene.


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  • Moderators, Home & Garden Moderators Posts: 5,554 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Wearb


    Sleeper12 wrote: »
    And yet any cold country would use this in their cars in the winter.

    Which countries use kerosene in their diesel car's? Sorry if that reply seems like point scoring. Just don't want anybody misreading this thread and thinking they can burn kero in diesel vehicles without causing damage.

    Please follow site and charter rules. "Resistance is futile"



  • Closed Accounts Posts: 6,721 ✭✭✭ Sir Arthur Daley


    Any old diesel engine will run fine on kerosene, i used it often on old jeeps. Bottom line its illegal to use, carrys the same fine as farmers wine.


  • Moderators, Home & Garden Moderators Posts: 5,554 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Wearb


    Any old diesel engine will run fine on kerosene, i used it often on old jeeps. Bottom line its illegal to use, carrys the same fine as farmers wine.

    We have already accepted the illegalities of it. You can start splitting hairs all you like but the bottom line is that it damages engines by causing excessive wear.

    Please follow site and charter rules. "Resistance is futile"



  • Registered Users Posts: 16,113 ✭✭✭✭ Sleeper12


    Wearb wrote: »
    Which countries use kerosene in their diesel car's? Sorry if that reply seems like point scoring. Just don't want anybody misreading this thread and thinking they can burn kero in diesel vehicles without causing damage.

    Norway, sweeten, etc. The mix is 80 diesel to 20 kerosene. Diesel engines run better & start better with kerosene in extreme cold. They actually make lubricants to and to the mix.
    Please note again I say it is illegal. That is why it is dyed red (red diesel)
    I can say from experience that jeep engines run very well with this mix


  • Moderators, Home & Garden Moderators Posts: 5,554 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Wearb


    Sleeper12 wrote: »
    Norway, sweeten, etc. The mix is 80 diesel to 20 kerosene. Diesel engines run better & start better with kerosene in extreme cold. They actually make lubricants to and to the mix.
    Please note again I say it is illegal. That is why it is dyed red (red diesel)
    I can say from experience that jeep engines run very well with this mix

    How far is that aray from what you originally said. btw, marked diesel is green here.
    OK! I have made my points and will not get into a hair splitting conversation over it.

    Please follow site and charter rules. "Resistance is futile"



  • Closed Accounts Posts: 6,721 ✭✭✭ Sir Arthur Daley


    Wearb wrote: »
    You can start splitting hairs all you like but the bottom line is that it damages engines by causing excessive wear.

    I have first hand experience on using it and disagree, a diesel engine can run on more than diesel.


  • Registered Users Posts: 16,113 ✭✭✭✭ Sleeper12


    Wearb wrote: »
    How far is that aray from what you originally said. btw, marked diesel is green here.
    OK! I have made my points and will not get into a hair splitting conversation over it.

    It's exactly what I originally said. Yes you can run a diesel engine on kerosene.
    Not sure what you mean about marked diesel but the red dye is added to kerosene because it can be used to run diesel engines but it doesn't have the excise duty on it. (red diesel)
    I also pointed out 3 times now that it is illegal but it can be done safely.
    I wouldn't bring kerosene to be recycled when it had other uses.


  • Registered Users Posts: 16,113 ✭✭✭✭ Sleeper12


    I have first hand experience on using it and disagree, a diesel engine can run on more than diesel.

    The beauty of a diesel engine is that it will run on just about anything. Oil, home heating oil, kerosene, or even cooking oil. Especially jeep engines.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 2,008 scudo2


    Sleeper12 wrote: »
    The beauty of a diesel engine is that it will run on just about anything. Oil, home heating oil, kerosene, or even cooking oil. Especially jeep engines.

    Just curious.
    Can a diesel engine run safely on 100% kerosene.
    I thought you'd need a more oily oil like diesel, or at least a mix.
    Even cooking oil will lubercate better, stinks like hell out the exhaust I'm told.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 6,721 ✭✭✭ Sir Arthur Daley


    Not alone can it run 100%, running on kerosene gives more power as its less viscous liquid it actually gives better spray through the injectors. Significant reduction in smoke too.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 16,113 ✭✭✭✭ Sleeper12


    scudo2 wrote: »
    Just curious.
    Can a diesel engine run safely on 100% kerosene.
    I thought you'd need a more oily oil like diesel, or at least a mix.
    Even cooking oil will lubercate better, stinks like hell out the exhaust I'm told.

    No not 100% you would need to add cooking oil or even engine oil. My jeep will run perfectly on 100% kerosene other engines might splutter.
    3 years ago My sisters boiler broke & she changed to gas. She had just under 1000 litres in the tank at the time. I used every last drop.
    I haven't done it since & again say it is illegal. If you are caught they confiscate your vehicle. You never get it back (as far as I know)


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 5,757 demanufactured


    Sleeper12 wrote: »
    It's exactly what I originally said. Yes you can run a diesel engine on kerosene.
    Not sure what you mean about marked diesel but the red dye is added to kerosene because it can be used to run diesel engines but it doesn't have the excise duty on it. (red diesel)
    I also pointed out 3 times now that it is illegal but it can be done safely.
    I wouldn't bring kerosene to be recycled when it had other uses.

    Marked diesel is White Diesel with the dye added.
    Kerosene is not red diesel.


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