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Your gardening photos

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  • Please tell me you're joking... It's obviously Japanese knotweed! :pac:

    Or, in this case, as I like to call it...
    NOT WEED
    . :D




  • ...ok, I'll give you a clue: Jack and the....




  • Garden was a disgrace and had got very overgrown



    Wont upload photo sorry.




  • New Home wrote: »
    Please tell me you're joking...
    If it was a joke, it was a non-RUNNER...:rolleyes:




  • New Home wrote: »
    ...ok, I'll give you a clue: Jack and the....

    Ha. Just seen the beans now. I was zooming in on a leaf. I was pulling and spraying bindweed thay day so it was on my mind. :cool:


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  • Think someone's slipped some viagra into my tomato feed :pac:

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    Geranium Rozanne with musk mallow




  • That is just gorgeous! I love the timber railings as well, really nice.




  • Finally, nearly there.

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  • When I moved in (Gravel next to gravel next to gravel):
    Garden-Before.jpg

    Just over a year later:
    Garden-Flowers-1.jpg

    Garden-Flowers-2.jpg

    Garden-Flowers-3.jpg

    Small-Tortoiseshell-2.jpg


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  • Bumper Crop of Blueberries this year, mainly because i used a cover to keep the birds away :p

    blueberries.jpg

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  • Nice one! Mine have done brilliantly this year as well even though they were fairly neglected. They were terrible last year, so it was a nice surprise to see them doing good.




  • Here is my garden produce but in final version. Of course some of stuff in there is not from my garden but majority was grown under elusive irish sun :)

    We use this stuff to season soup or stew, you can put a pinch or two on your eggs, some people put some on bread and butter. Can be used to season noodles, possibilities are endless. It is used mostly in central europe cuisine and it is known as vegeta.
    Dried and crushed/minced to powder vegetables and herbs with salt and turmeric. Carrots, parsnip, leek, onion, garlic, peppers, curly parsnip, corriander, chives, celery.

    vegeta.jpg




  • patnor1011 wrote: »
    Here is my garden produce but in final version. Of course some of stuff in there is not from my garden but majority was grown under elusive irish sun :)

    We use this stuff to season soup or stew, you can put a pinch or two on your eggs, some people put some on bread and butter. Can be used to season noodles, possibilities are endless. It is used mostly in central europe cuisine and it is known as vegeta.
    Dried and crushed/minced to powder vegetables and herbs with salt and turmeric. Carrots, parsnip, leek, onion, garlic, peppers, curly parsnip, corriander, chives, celery.

    vegeta.jpg

    How are you drying your veg etc?




  • How are you drying your veg etc?

    I made 60x18 cm frame from wood and used window netting. In the summer I leave it out but most of the stuff is dried over a radiator. I have 10 of them. I was drying orange peels first and after getting about 4 kilograms of dried orange peel powder which is a fantastic stuff for cooking or bath I tried other stuff and this is the result.




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    Loads of tomatoes this season. All started hydroponically in the house from seeds.




  • I am happy with how a wildflower meadow that I planted turned out this year (despite the weather at times!) but I am even more pleased at the amount of insects and birds that have been drawn to it.


    attachment.php?attachmentid=523970&stc=1&d=1598175142

    attachment.php?attachmentid=523971&stc=1&d=1598175142

    attachment.php?attachmentid=523972&stc=1&d=1598175142




  • Anyone elses flowers and hanging baskets get ruined from the wind and rain the other day. My hanging baskets in particular look terrible.




  • Yep. I've taken mine down (they weren't the best this year anyway) I'll be putting up the ivy baskets for the autumn/ winter




  • I've 2 with begonias, one is almost bare and the other is perfect after the storm, I'm hoping it will just recover as they've been gorgeous all summer.


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  • Hi. I'm thinking of planting wildflowers around my garden next year. How did you prepare the ground before you planted the wildflower seeds ?




  • Hi. I'm thinking of planting wildflowers around my garden next year. How did you prepare the ground before you planted the wildflower seeds ?

    I have grown a wildflower meadow for the past 14 years with a few other wildflower strips around the garden. What advice I give is just based on my own experience of growing wildflowers every year and the bit of reading that I have done around it. I am certainly no expert on it.
    In reality, there is not much work to it all and if you understand a few basic principles, they are not that difficult to maintain and they certainly are rewarding as a gardener if you like that wild dimension in your patch.
    When I first planted a wildflower patch, it was a riot of colour the first year. What happens in subsequent years if you do not till the plot, is that some grasses become more dominant and some of the original wildflowers do better than others. In my own patch, different purple vetches, yellow vetchlings and different yellow birds foot trefoils became the dominant species as the years went on as well as some Red Clover. I was happy with that as a lot of pollinators were still drawn to the meadow every year but the variety of colour was not as dramatic as the first year after sowing. To maintain it, I usually strimmed it in the late summer, let the cuttings and seed heads dry on it in warm weather for a day or two and then remove them all. Wildflowers can compete better with grasses on poorer soils and by removing the cuttings you are trying not too enrich the soil. Over the years, even though I liked the increasing clover patches as it attracted many bees, it too enriched the soil by fixing nitrogen to it.
    This year, I decided to plant the meadow again as I wanted a more varied blast of colour through the summer. In early April I dug it with a fork and removed roots, scrub and small sods from it. I also skimmed off some soil with a shovel where I thought it was a bit rich or deep and used that elsewhere in the garden. I raked it to a fine enough tilth then. I waited 9 or 10 days for small seedlings to appear, and then hoed them out of it without being overly precise. Most of these were probably grasses and weeds for want of a better word. I did this instead of using a weedkiller.
    I then scattered the seed over the prepared area and gently raked it in. I then let nature do the rest. I did however water the wildflower seeds once in early May as we had a Spring drought due to good weather then and this helped them on their way.
    As the pictures above show, the poppies were in full bloom a few weeks ago along with Red Shank which is usually regarded as a wildflower/weed that enjoys broken or newly disturbed ground. (I have read that their seeds can lay dormant in the ground for a few decades until the ground is disturbed and conditions become favourable for them to germinate).They did well as a result of the ground being disturbed this year. The great thing about a wildflower meadow is that some of the colours come in waves as different species come into bloom at certain times. Blues, whites, pinks and purples are in vogue the last week or two in the meadow. There is also no worries about so called weeds appearing in it either and in fact buttercups gave my own wildflower patch a nice welcome splash of yellow in the early summer.
    Finally, what is fascinating and probably the most rewarding thing about a wildflower patch is how various pollinators and insects are drawn to it. Best of luck with it if you decide to give it a go.




  • Goldfinch8 wrote: »
    I am happy with how a wildflower meadow that I planted turned out this year (despite the weather at times!) but I am even more pleased at the amount of insects and birds that have been drawn to it.

    That is fab.




  • Goldfinch8 wrote:
    I have grown a wildflower meadow for the past 14 years with a few other wildflower strips around the garden. What advice I give is just based on my own experience of growing wildflowers every year and the bit of reading that I have done around it. I am certainly no expert on it. In reality, there is not much work to it all and if you understand a few basic principles, they are not that difficult to maintain and they certainly are rewarding as a gardener if you like that wild dimension in your patch. When I first planted a wildflower patch, it was a riot of colour the first year. What happens in subsequent years if you do not till the plot, is that some grasses become more dominant and some of the original wildflowers do better than others. In my own patch, different purple vetches, yellow vetchlings and different yellow birds foot trefoils became the dominant species as the years went on as well as some Red Clover. I was happy with that as a lot of pollinators were still drawn to the meadow every year but the variety of colour was not as dramatic as the first year after sowing. To maintain it, I usually strimmed it in the late summer, let the cuttings and seed heads dry on it in warm weather for a day or two and then remove them all. Wildflowers can compete better with grasses on poorer soils and by removing the cuttings you are trying not too enrich the soil. Over the years, even though I liked the increasing clover patches as it attracted many bees, it too enriched the soil by fixing nitrogen to it. This year, I decided to plant the meadow again as I wanted a more varied blast of colour through the summer. In early April I dug it with a fork and removed roots, scrub and small sods from it. I also skimmed off some soil with a shovel where I thought it was a bit rich or deep and used that elsewhere in the garden. I raked it to a fine enough tilth then. I waited 9 or 10 days for small seedlings to appear, and then hoed them out of it without being overly precise. Most of these were probably grasses and weeds for want of a better word. I did this instead of using a weedkiller. I then scattered the seed over the prepared area and gently raked it in. I then let nature do the rest. I did however water the wildflower seeds once in early May as we had a Spring drought due to good weather then and this helped them on their way. As the pictures above show, the poppies were in full bloom a few weeks ago along with Red Shank which is usually regarded as a wildflower/weed that enjoys broken or newly disturbed ground. (I have read that their seeds can lay dormant in the ground for a few decades until the ground is disturbed and conditions become favourable for them to germinate).They did well as a result of the ground being disturbed this year. The great thing about a wildflower meadow is that some of the colours come in waves as different species come into bloom at certain times. Blues, whites, pinks and purples are in vogue the last week or two in the meadow. There is also no worries about so called weeds appearing in it either and in fact buttercups gave my own wildflower patch a nice welcome splash of yellow in the early summer. Finally, what is fascinating and probably the most rewarding thing about a wildflower patch is how various pollinators and insects are drawn to it. Best of luck with it if you decide to give it a go.


    Thanks for that advice. Looking forward to enjoying it next year !




  • Not as aesthetically pleasing as many of the other pics, but highly rewarding!
    524139.jpg




  • That's a lot of bind weed. You'll enjoy watching that burn :)




  • That's a lot of bind weed. You'll enjoy watching that burn :)

    Its busy rotting away now, the smell is atrocious! :)

    I've had a few more pieces appear that I've added to the pile, but heres hoping I'm Bindweed free in 2021!




  • I've been experimenting this year with continuously pulling it up everytime I see it. So far its definitely weaking it.




  • I've been experimenting this year with continuously pulling it up everytime I see it. So far its definitely weaking it.

    My garden is very old and I'd estimate unmaintained for 10+ years so the root system (as you can see!) was very strong.
    I had been pulling it but it was just reappearing every week, everywhere and was pissing me off.

    I have to say that while back-breaking, it was *very* satisfying to trace the roots out. The number of times I thought I was just only to dig a little deeper and low and behold I'd find a warren of the white ba$tards!
    I recommend using a hand fork and prising up the soil.


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  • my hanging basket of petunias...

    petunia.jpg


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