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Irish Cycling Legislation

  • 29-01-2014 4:15pm
    #1
    Moderators, Politics Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 23,959 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Chips Lovell


    Following some recent discussions on a few threads, I thought it worthwhile to start a thread to round up all the various bits of legislation related to cycling. It might be useful to try have everything in one place, to serve as a sort of FAQ.

    The idea would be people post up stuff as they come across it and I'll try and update/correct the OP with any new info. It's a big enough project, since one law can sometimes be superseded by newer laws.

    So, let's get the ball rolling

    Disclaimer: This isn't legal advice and shouldn't be mistaken as such. It is simply a collective attempt to pull together legislation of interest to cyclist and highlight key points.

    Cycle Lanes

    What the law says:
    14. (1) A cycle track shall be indicated by—

    (a) traffic sign number RUS 009 (with-flow cycle track) provided in association with traffic sign number RRM 022 (continuous white line) or RRM 023 (broken white line) which latter signs may be marked on the right hand edge of the cycle track or on the right hand and left hand edges of the cycle track,

    (b) traffic sign number RUS 059 (contra-flow cycle track) provided in association with traffic sign number RRM 022 (continuous white line) which may be marked on the right hand edge of the cycle track or on the left hand edge of the cycle track or on both sides, or

    (c) traffic sign number RUS 058 (shared track for pedal cycles and pedestrians).

    (2) The periods of operation of a cycle track may be indicated on an information plate which may be provided in association with traffic sign number RUS 009, RUS 059 or RUS 058.

    (3) Where a cycle track, provided by traffic sign number RUS 009 in association with traffic sign number RRM 022 (continuous white line) or RRM 023 (broken white line), is two-way, pedal cycles shall be driven as near as possible to the left hand side of each lane.

    (4) A pedal cycle shall be driven on a cycle track where—

    (a) a cycle track is provided on a road, a portion of a road, or an area at the entrance to which traffic sign number RUS 021 (pedestrianised street or area) is provided, or

    (b) a cycle track is a contra-flow cycle track where traffic sign number RUS 059 is provided and pedal cycles shall only be driven in a contra-flow direction on such track.

    (5)(a) A mechanically propelled vehicle, other than a mechanically propelled wheelchair, shall not be driven along or across a cycle track on the right hand edge of which traffic sign number RRM 022 has been provided, save for the purposes of access to or egress from a place adjacent to the cycle track or from a roadway to such a place.

    (b) A reference in paragraph (a) to driving along or across a cycle track shall include a reference to driving wholly or partly along or across a cycle track.

    What this means:
    It replaces older legislation, which obliged cyclists to use a cycle lane where provided. You are now only obliged to use a cycle lane when it is on a pedestrianised street or is a contra-flow lane


    Lights

    What the law says:
    29. (1) Every pedal cycle shall at all times while ridden, or wheeled by a person on foot, in a public place during lighting-up hours be equipped with and, subject to sub-article (2) of this article, show duly lit a front lamp complying with the provisions of sub-article (3) of this article and a rear lamp complying with the provisions of sub-article (4) of this article.

    (2) The requirement in sub-article (1) of this article that the front and rear lamps be shown duly lit shall not apply if and so long as the cycle is stopped in course of traffic or is being wheeled by a person on foot as near as possible to the left hand edge of the roadway.

    (3) A front lamp fitted to a cycle shall—

    (a) when lit, show to the front of the cycle a white or yellow light visible during lighting-up hours for a reasonable distance,
    (b) be fitted on the centre line of the vehicle or to the right of that line,
    (c) be fitted so that no part of the illuminated surface of the lamp is more than 5 feet from the ground.
    (4) A rear lamp fitted to a cycle shall—

    (a) when lit, show to the rear of the cycle a red light visible during lighting-up hours for a reasonable distance,
    (b) have an illuminated area of at least 2 square inches and of such a shape that a circle of 1 inch in diameter may be inscribed therein,
    (c) be fitted—
    (i) on the centre line of the cycle or to the right of that line,
    (ii) so that no part of the illuminated surface of the lamp is more than 3 feet or less than 12 inches from the ground,
    (iii) so that it is not more than 20 inches from the extreme rear of the cycle.

    What this means:
    You need a front and rear light during lighting up times. Front light must be white or yellow, rear must be red. You will still need lights but they don't need to be turned on if you are stopped in traffic or walking while wheeling your bicycle along the left hand side of the road.


    Reflectors

    What the law says:
    33. (1) Every vehicle shall at all times while used in a public place be equipped with either one or two (as may be required under sub-article (4) of this article) rear reflectors (in this Part of these Regulations referred to as "obligatory rear reflectors") complying in all respects with the provisions of this Part of these Regulations.
    (4) (a) In the case of a pedal cycle or a mechanically propelled bicycle used without a side-car, one obligatory rear reflector shall be fitted to the vehicle.
    (5) Every obligatory rear reflector shall be fitted to the vehicle in a vertical position, facing squarely to the rear so as to be plainly visible from the rear.

    (6) Every obligatory rear reflector shall be so constructed, fitted and maintained as to be plainly visible at night time in clear weather for a distance of 325 feet when illuminated by the head lamps of a mechanically propelled vehicle directly behind.
    37. (1) Every vehicle used in a public place shall be equipped only with such reflectors as comply with the following provisions of this article.

    (2) Every reflector with which a vehicle is equipped and which is visible from outside the vehicle shall be—

    (a) red, if facing to the rear,
    (b) amber, if facing to the side,
    (c) white, if facing to the front.
    53. Where a person is charged with a contravention in the day time of articles 9, 22, 29 and 33 of these Regulations, it shall be a good defence to show that the vehicle was primarily constructed or adapted for the purpose of racing or trials and was either being used for such purpose or was travelling to or from the venue of a race or trial in which the vehicle had taken part or was intended to take part.

    What this means:
    You need to have a red rear reflector on your bicycle at all times. The only exception is if, during daylight, you are doing a race or on your way to and from one. If you put any additional reflectors on your bike, they need to comply with the colour regulations, i.e. red facing rear, yellow facing sideways or white facing to the front.


    Brakes

    What the law says:
    93. (2) Every pedal cycle (other than a cycle so constructed that the pedals act directly on any wheel or its axle without the intervention of any gearing, chain or other device) while used in a public place shall be equipped with an efficient braking device, or two efficient braking devices, in accordance with the following provisions, that is to say:—

    (a) where at least one wheel of the cycle is incapable of rotating independently of the pedals or where the cycle is designed for use by a child not more than seven years of age, the cycle shall be equipped with one braking device;
    (b) in any other case, the cycle shall be equipped with two braking devices and, in the case of a bicycle, one device shall operate on the front wheel and one device shall operate on the rear wheel.

    What this means:
    You need to have brakes on your bike. You must have a front and rear brake, unless you are riding a fixed gear or a young child's, in which case you must have one brake.


    Bells

    What the law says:
    93. (1) Every pedal cycle (other than a cycle constructed or adapted for use as a racing cycle) while used in a public place shall be fitted with an audible warning device consisting of a bell capable of being heard at a reasonable distance, and no other type of audible warning instrument shall be fitted to a pedal cycle while used in a public place.

    What this means:
    You need to have a bell on your bike, unless it is a racing type bike (which rules out a lot of bicycle types including road bikes, TT bikes, mountain bikes etc). A bell is the only warning device you can use. Horns, sirens etc are illegal.


    Cycling Two Abreast

    What the law says:
    29.—(1) A pedal cyclist shall not, save when overtaking other pedal cyclists (and then only if to do so will not endanger other traffic or pedestrians) drive a pedal cycle on a roadway in such a manner as to result in more than two pedal cycles driving abreast.

    (2) Pedal cyclists on a roadway shall cycle in single file when overtaking other traffic.

    What this means:

    You may cycle two abreast. You can cycle three abreast while overtaking, but only when a.) the overtaking cyclists are cycling in single file and the overtaken cyclists are two abreasts and b.) the overtaking manoeuvre is not endangering other road users.


    Helmets


    There is no law in Ireland obliging cyclists to wear a helmet.


    High visibility clothing

    There is no law in Ireland obliging cyclists to wear a high visibility clothing. The only legislation around visibility relates to bicycles themselves (see Lights and Reflectors)


    Bus Lanes

    What the law says:
    32. (1) A bus lane shall be indicated by means of traffic sign number RUS 028 or traffic sign number RUS 029 used in association with traffic sign number RRM 024, and a contra flow bus lane shall be indicated by means of traffic sign number RUS 030 used in association with traffic sign number RRM 024.

    (2) A person shall not enter a bus lane with a vehicle other than an omnibus or a pedal cycle during the period of operation of the bus lane which shall be indicated on an information plate.
    (4) A person shall not enter a bus only street with a vehicle other than an omnibus except for the purpose of access.

    (5) ( a ) Sub-articles (1) and (2) shall not apply to a vehicle crossing a with flow bus lane or a contra flow bus lane solely for the purpose—
    (i) of entering or leaving premises or property adjacent to such a bus lane, or
    (ii) of entering or leaving a road inset adjacent to such a bus lane in order to load or unload goods.
    ( b ) Sub-article (2) shall not apply to a taxi or a wheelchair accessible taxi which is being used in the course of business.
    (3) A person shall not enter a contra-flow bus lane with a vehicle other than a large public service vehicle or a pedal cycle.

    What this means:
    You may cycle in a normal bus lane and the law was recently changed to allow you to cycle in a contra-flow bus lane. Although some drivers seem to think that cyclists are prohibited from cycling in lanes marked with signs that have just a bus on them (as opposed to a bus and a bike), no distinction is made in legislation and these signs aren't mentioned.


    Advanced Stop Boxes

    What the law says:
    30. (1) Where traffic sign number RTS 001, RTS 002, RTS 003, RTS 004 or RTS 013 (referred to in these Regulations as ‘traffic lights’) is provided, a person shall not drive a vehicle past the traffic lights, or past traffic sign number RRM 017 (stop line) where such sign is provided in association with the traffic lights when the red lamp of the traffic light is illuminated.

    (2) A driver of a vehicle approaching traffic lights in which a non-flashing amber light is illuminated, shall not drive the vehicle past the traffic lights, or past traffic sign number RRM 017 (stop line) when such sign is provided in association with the traffic lights, save when the vehicle is so close to the traffic lights that it cannot safely be stopped before passing the traffic lights or traffic sign number RRM 017.

    (3)(a) A driver of a vehicle facing traffic sign number RTS 001, RTS 002, RTS 003 or RTS 013 in which the green lamp is illuminated may proceed beyond the traffic lights, or beyond traffic sign number RRM 017 (stop line) if such traffic sign is provided in association with the traffic lights, provided no other road user is endangered and subject to compliance with the relevant provisions of articles 8 and 29.

    (b) When traffic lights contain green lamps which indicate a directional arrow, a driver of a vehicle wishing to proceed in accordance with paragraph (a) in the direction indicated by the arrow may only do so when such lamp is illuminated.

    What this means:
    Legally, an advanced stop box appears to consist of two stop line road markings, with a bicycle symbol placed between the two. There is no specific exemption for pedal cycles to cross the stop line into an advanced stop box, meaning it is only legal for cyclists to enter the box on red via a feeder lane, into which the stop line does not extend.


    Holding on to Other Vehicles

    What the law says:
    100.—(1) A person on a bicycle or a tricycle in a public place shall not hold on to any other vehicle (other than a pedal bicycle which no person is driving) which is in motion or hold on to any person or thing on, in or attached to any such vehicle.


    (2) A person who contravenes subsection (1) of this section shall be guilty of an offence.

    What this means:
    You can't hold on to a car or any other vehicle while it is in motion. Nor can you hold on to anyone in a vehicle or anything attached to it. The only other vehicle you can hold on to while in motion is another bike, provided no one is on it. So you're allowed cycle whilst wheeling another bike.


    Identifying Yourself to a Garda

    What the law says:
    80.— The following section is substituted for section 108 of the Principal Act:
    "108.— A member of the Garda Síochána may demand of a person in charge of a pedal cycle whom the member suspects of having committed any crime or offence or of having been concerned or involved in a collision or other event in a public place causing injury to person or property, the name and address and date of birth of such person, and if such a person refuses or fails to give his or her name and address or date of birth or gives a name or address or date of birth which the member has reasonable grounds for believing to be false or misleading, the member may take the cycle, by reasonable force if necessary, and retain it until such time as he or she is satisfied as to the identity of such person".
    47.— The Act of 1961 is amended—

    (a) in subsections (4) and (5) (inserted by section 73 of the Act of 2010) of section 69, by substituting “name and address and date of birth” for “name and address or date of birth” in each place where it occurs, and

    (b) in section 108 (inserted by section 80 of the Act of 2010), by substituting “name and address and date of birth” for “name and address or date of birth”.

    What this means:
    If a Garda suspects you having been involved in an offence or incident leading to injury or property damage, they are entitled to demand your name and address and date of birth. If you refuse to do so, or if the Garda believes you are lying, they can seize your bike.


    Cycling While Intoxicated

    What the law says:
    6.— (1) A person shall not, in a public place—

    (a) drive or attempt to drive, or be in charge of, an animal-drawn vehicle, or

    (b) drive or attempt to drive a pedal cycle,

    while he or she is under the influence of an intoxicant to such an extent as to be incapable of having proper control of the vehicle or cycle.
    11.— (1) A member of the Garda Síochána, for the purposes of forming the opinion that a person in charge of a vehicle in a public place is under the influence of an intoxicant to such an extent as to be incapable of having proper control of the vehicle, if he or she considers it would assist him or her to form such opinion, may require the person to perform in the presence of the member or another member such impairment tests, in the manner indicated, in accordance with impairment test regulations, by the member or other member in whose presence the test is to be performed.

    What this means:
    You can't cycle while intoxicated. Also, the use of the word "intoxicant" means that the legislation covers all drugs, not just alcohol. There is no alcohol/drug limit in place, which means that Garda has to form an opinion that you are intoxicated. They are entitled to ask you to perform an impairment test.


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Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 1,141 Doctor Bob


    The idea would be people post up stuff as they come across it and I'll try and update/correct the OP with any new info.

    If people have queries on the law, can they post a question here? I know most of the legislation and regs, but a question might bring up points not otherwise included. These could then be added to the OP as proposed.

    e.g. What's the difference between cycle lanes, cycle tracks, cycleways and cycle paths? (Part answer- two of them don't exist in law.:))


  • Moderators, Politics Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 23,959 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Chips Lovell


    That would be the idea alright. What I'd like to go for is having an FAQ type opening post, with discussion below. Then update the OP based on what emerges from the discussion.

    I've updated the OP with regs on reflectors.

    Now, does anyone know if there is any specific legislation applying to road position for cyclists? My understanding is that the same regs apply to all vehicle types, re. staying left.


  • Moderators, Computer Games Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 14,501 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Darkglasses


    The words about when cyclists can go two/three abreast should probably go in here too.


  • Moderators, Politics Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 23,959 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Chips Lovell


    OP updated with legislation on brakes, bells and cycling two abreast.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,643 ✭✭✭ JMcL


    Exellent idea. Should it be a sticky, and would it make sense to post links to the relevant SIs as well as just the numbers?


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  • Registered Users Posts: 45 SMacX


    Hi,

    Are ASL's enforceable?

    Are they mentioned or described by legislation?


  • Moderators, Politics Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 23,959 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Chips Lovell


    Have updated OP now with sections on Bus Lanes, Helmets and High Viz. If anyone has any insight into the legal standing of bus lane signs without bikes on them, it would be much appreciated.
    JMcL wrote: »
    Exellent idea. Should it be a sticky, and would it make sense to post links to the relevant SIs as well as just the numbers?

    I'll add links when I get a chance. If the thread takes off, we can link to it from our list of useful/popular threads. There are limits on how many stickies we can have
    SMacX wrote: »
    Hi,

    Are ASL's enforceable?

    Are they mentioned or described by legislation?

    Good question. I don't think I've ever seen the legislation on ASLs.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,141 Doctor Bob



    Helmets

    There is now law in Ireland obliging cyclists to wear a helmet.

    Spotted a minor typo in the OP. Probably too insignificant to bother changing, right? :pac:

    I'll be back later to address the 'bus only' bus lane signs and ASLs if they haven't been responded to in the meantime.


  • Registered Users Posts: 7,797 ✭✭✭ buffalo


    SMacX wrote: »
    Hi,

    Are ASL's enforceable?

    Are they mentioned or described by legislation?

    I went looking for this recently, and the only thing I could find was UK law.


  • Moderators, Politics Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 23,959 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Chips Lovell


    ASLs appear in the Traffic Sign Manual. They appear to be comprised of two stop road markings (RRM 117) with a bicycle marking in between, referred to as "M 116". Haven't found any reference to the latter road marking in legislation yet.

    Hopefully Doctor Bob will be able to throw some light on it.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 7,797 ✭✭✭ buffalo


    ASLs appear in the Traffic Sign Manual. They appear to be comprised of two stop road markings (RRM 117) with a bicycle marking in between, referred to as "M 116". Haven't found any reference to the latter road marking in legislation yet.

    Hopefully Doctor Bob will be able to throw some light on it.

    The M116 appears to refer to the actual bicycle symbol, as a bike area - be it lane, track, ASBs. It doesn't appear to be unique to the box.

    So it appears we're just talking about a stop line (RRM 017 refers to both a regular stop line and an advanced one), which is dealt with by our old friend 332/2012 http://www.irishstatutebook.ie/2012/en/si/0332.html
    30. (1) Where traffic sign number RTS 001, RTS 002, RTS 003, RTS 004 or RTS 013 (referred to in these Regulations as ‘traffic lights’) is provided, a person shall not drive a vehicle past the traffic lights, or past traffic sign number RRM 017 (stop line) where such sign is provided in association with the traffic lights when the red lamp of the traffic light is illuminated.

    (2) A driver of a vehicle approaching traffic lights in which a non-flashing amber light is illuminated, shall not drive the vehicle past the traffic lights, or past traffic sign number RRM 017 (stop line) when such sign is provided in association with the traffic lights, save when the vehicle is so close to the traffic lights that it cannot safely be stopped before passing the traffic lights or traffic sign number RRM 017.

    (3)(a) A driver of a vehicle facing traffic sign number RTS 001, RTS 002, RTS 003 or RTS 013 in which the green lamp is illuminated may proceed beyond the traffic lights, or beyond traffic sign number RRM 017 (stop line) if such traffic sign is provided in association with the traffic lights, provided no other road user is endangered and subject to compliance with the relevant provisions of articles 8 and 29.

    (b) When traffic lights contain green lamps which indicate a directional arrow, a driver of a vehicle wishing to proceed in accordance with paragraph (a) in the direction indicated by the arrow may only do so when such lamp is illuminated.

    Summary - a driver may cross the stop line (i.e. enter an advanced stop box) when the light is green, or if it is not safe to stop before it on amber. A drive cannot cross the line if the light is red.

    There is no specific exemption for pedal cycles to cross the stop line into an advanced stop box, meaning it is only legal for cyclists to enter the box on red via a feeder lane, into which the stop line does not extend.

    ...as far as I can tell. I'm going home now.


  • Registered Users Posts: 942 ✭✭✭ outfox


    Good thread VK. Never knew that a rear reflector is mandatory.
    Need to consult The Rules first though before installing, as might be prohibited.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,089 ✭✭✭ NamelessPhil


    Contra Flow Bus Lanes

    S.I. 332/2012 does permit bicycles to use contra-flow bus lanes.

    Bus Lanes


    32. (1)(a) A bus lane shall be indicated by means of traffic sign number RUS 028 or traffic sign number RUS 029 used in association with traffic sign number RRM 024.


    (b) A contra-flow bus lane shall be indicated by means of traffic sign number RUS 030 used in association with traffic sign number RRM 024.


    (2) A person shall not enter a bus lane with a vehicle other than a large public service vehicle or a pedal cycle during the period of operation of the bus lane indicated on an information plate.


    (3) A person shall not enter a contra-flow bus lane with a vehicle other than a large public service vehicle or a pedal cycle.


    It is legal to use the contra-flow bus lane on St. Stephen's Green to access Earlsfort Terrace.


  • Moderators, Politics Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 23,959 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Chips Lovell


    Great work NamelessPhil and Buffalo


  • Registered Users Posts: 881 ✭✭✭ Bloodwing



    Lights

    What the law says:
    Originally Posted by S.I. No. 189/1963 - Road Traffic (Lighting of Vehicles) Regulations, 1963
    29. (1) Every pedal cycle shall at all times while ridden, or wheeled by a person on foot, in a public place during lighting-up hours be equipped with and, subject to sub-article (2) of this article, show duly lit a front lamp complying with the provisions of sub-article (3) of this article and a rear lamp complying with the provisions of sub-article (4) of this article.

    (2) The requirement in sub-article (1) of this article that the front and rear lamps be shown duly lit shall not apply if and so long as the cycle is stopped in course of traffic or is being wheeled by a person on foot as near as possible to the left hand edge of the roadway.

    (3) A front lamp fitted to a cycle shall—

    (a) when lit, show to the front of the cycle a white or yellow light visible during lighting-up hours for a reasonable distance,
    (b) be fitted on the centre line of the vehicle or to the right of that line,
    (c) be fitted so that no part of the illuminated surface of the lamp is more than 5 feet from the ground.
    (4) A rear lamp fitted to a cycle shall—

    (a) when lit, show to the rear of the cycle a red light visible during lighting-up hours for a reasonable distance,
    (b) have an illuminated area of at least 2 square inches and of such a shape that a circle of 1 inch in diameter may be inscribed therein,
    (c) be fitted—
    (i) on the centre line of the cycle or to the right of that line,
    (ii) so that no part of the illuminated surface of the lamp is more than 3 feet or less than 12 inches from the ground,
    (iii) so that it is not more than 20 inches from the extreme rear of the cycle.

    What this means:
    You need a front and rear light during lighting up times. Front light must be white or yellow, rear must be red. You don't need lights if you are stopped or walking while wheeling your bicycle along the left hand side of the road.



    My reading of the legislation would imply that you do need lights to be fitted "if you are stopped or walking while wheeling your bicycle along the left hand side of the road" however they do not need to be lit, maybe that's what you meant but it doesn't really read that way.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,089 ✭✭✭ NamelessPhil


    No holding on to other vehicles a.k.a. no stickybottle

    http://www.irishstatutebook.ie/1961/en/act/pub/0024/sec0100.html#sec100

    100.—(1) A person on a bicycle or a tricycle in a public place shall not hold on to any other vehicle (other than a pedal bicycle which no person is driving) which is in motion or hold on to any person or thing on, in or attached to any such vehicle.


    (2) A person who contravenes subsection (1) of this section shall be guilty of an offence.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,089 ✭✭✭ NamelessPhil


    The Road Traffic Act, 1961 is usually cited as the "Principal Act" governing road traffic.

    There have been many amendments to the Act over the years and each amendment to a section is now listed in the "Legislation Directory Entry". This link contains links to amendments as they have arisen. There is no such thing as consolidated legislation, therefore if you are looking at a section of an act it may have been amended or even repealed. It can be quite difficult to track the changes to legislation for example the section permitting a garda to demand the name and address of a pedal cyclist:-

    In the 1961 Act Section 108 states:

    "—A member of the Garda Síochána may demand of a person in charge of a pedal cycle whom the member suspects of having committed any crime or offence or of having been concerned or involved in a collision or other event in a public place causing injury to person or property, the name and address of such person, and if such a person refuses or fails to give his name and address or gives a name or address which the member has reasonable grounds for believing to be false or misleading, the member may take the cycle, by force if necessary, and retain it until such time as he is satisfied as to the identity of such person."

    This section was amended by the Road Traffic Act, 2010 to read:

    “108.— A member of the Garda Síochána may demand of a person in charge of a pedal cycle whom the member suspects of having committed any crime or offence or of having been concerned or involved in a collision or other event in a public place causing injury to person or property, the name and address and date of birth of such person, and if such a person refuses or fails to give his or her name and address or date of birth or gives a name or address or date of birth which the member has reasonable grounds for believing to be false or misleading, the member may take the cycle, by reasonable force if necessary, and retain it until such time as he or she is satisfied as to the identity of such person.”.

    This was further amended by Section 47(b) of the Road Safety Authority (Commercial Vehicle Roadworthiness) Act 2012

    47.— The Act of 1961 is amended—

    (b) in section 108 (inserted by section 80 of the Act of 2010), by substituting “name and address and date of birth” for “name and address or date of birth”.

    So the section should finally read:

    "108.— A member of the Garda Síochána may demand of a person in charge of a pedal cycle whom the member suspects of having committed any crime or offence or of having been concerned or involved in a collision or other event in a public place causing injury to person or property, the name and address and date of birth of such person, and if such a person refuses or fails to give his or her name and address and date of birth or gives a name or address and date of birth which the member has reasonable grounds for believing to be false or misleading, the member may take the cycle, by reasonable force if necessary, and retain it until such time as he or she is satisfied as to the identity of such person.”


  • Moderators, Motoring & Transport Moderators Posts: 13,989 Mod ✭✭✭✭ monument


    I've been thinking of doing of doing a guide to the rules of the road for cycling... Sadly the top things on my mind has been red lights and footpaths -- and generally how most rules apply to cyclists.

    I still think the Rules if the Road fails on the basics for cycling, or at least the last version did, I've only scanned the recent version one or twice.
    Bloodwing wrote: »
    My reading of the legislation would imply that you do need lights to be fitted "if you are stopped or walking while wheeling your bicycle along the left hand side of the road" however they do not need to be lit, maybe that's what you meant but it doesn't really read that way.

    Yes, it seems to be a provision which allows for the use of Dynamo lights.


  • Moderators, Politics Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 23,959 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Chips Lovell


    I've corrected the entries on Bus Lanes and Lights

    I've added sections on Advanced Stop Boxes, Holding on to Other Vehicles, Identifying Yourself to a Garda and Cycling While Intoxicated.

    Thanks again to everyone who has pitched in. Keep 'em coming.

    On the subject of Advanced Stop Boxes, I took note of a few while out on the bike last night. Of the six I looked at, four had no cycle lane leading into them. Does this mean there is no legal way of entering them?


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,169 ✭✭✭ enda1


    You need to have a bell on your bike, unless it is a racing type bike (which rules out a lot of bicycle types including road bikes, TT bikes, mountain bikes etc). A bell is the only warning device you can use. Horns, sirens etc are illegal.

    To clarify about the bell issue, are you saying that mountain bikes, TT bikes, road bikes etc. do not need bells fitted?


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 6,450 Harrybelafonte


    (3) A person shall not enter a contra-flow bus lane with a vehicle other than a large public service vehicle or a pedal cycle.


    Does this mean 'car taxis' are not allowed use contra flow bus lanes?


  • Registered Users Posts: 7,797 ✭✭✭ buffalo


    On the subject of Advanced Stop Boxes, I took note of a few while out on the bike last night. Of the six I looked at, four had no cycle lane leading into them. Does this mean there is no legal way of entering them?

    Technically, yes. Here's a piece from the UK cycling lobby, CTC:
    When the lights are red, cyclists may only enter the reservoir via the cycle lane, not by crossing the stop line.

    This legislation raised a question over the legality of not having a cycle lane - without
    one, it has been technically illegal for a cyclist to enter the ASL box in the absence of
    a green light. Several authorities sought to overcome this by leaving a 1.2m break at the
    nearside end of the main stop line, possibly with a token length of cycle lane, or tapered
    feeder lane. The legality of this approach, however, has been unclear.

    (from http://www.ctc.org.uk/file/public/asls_0.pdf)

    I know it's UK law, but my reading of Irish law would be the same (NB, not a lawyer, government representative, etc.).


  • Moderators, Politics Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 23,959 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Chips Lovell


    enda1 wrote: »
    To clarify about the bell issue, are you saying that mountain bikes, TT bikes, road bikes etc. do not need bells fitted?

    Yes, that's what the legislation appears to be saying.
    (3) A person shall not enter a contra-flow bus lane with a vehicle other than a large public service vehicle or a pedal cycle.

    Does this mean 'car taxis' are not allowed use contra flow bus lanes?

    Going by that piece of legislation, no, they don't appear to be allowed. However to be sure, you'd need to check to see if there's any subsequent legislation permitting them.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,089 ✭✭✭ NamelessPhil


    Flashing lights on bicycles

    S.I. No. 487/2009 - Road Traffic (Lighting of Vehicles) (Amendment) Regulations 2009

    3. In these Regulations “Principal Regulations” means Road Traffic (Lighting of Vehicles) Regulations 1963 ( S.I. No. 189 of 1963 ).


    4. Article 29 of the Principal Regulations is amended by inserting after sub-article (4) the following:


    (5) In this article, ‘lit’ means the emission of a continuous light or a light that flashes not less than 60 times in each minute.”.


    5. The following is substituted for Article 42 of the Principal Regulations:


    “42. (1) Subject to sub-article (2), no lamp (other than direction indicators) fitted to a vehicle shall show or be constructed or adapted so as to be capable of showing a flashing light unless such light is invisible to persons outside the vehicle.


    (2) This article does not apply to a lamp fitted to a pedal cycle in accordance with article 29.”.

    What this means:

    These Regulations make it legal for pedal cyclists to use the flashing front and rear lamps that are in common usage.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,089 ✭✭✭ NamelessPhil


    It would be useful if links to the legislation could be included in the posts as the original wording could be seen in the context of the legislation. The Irish Statute Book website includes the following disclaimer:-


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 8,156 Iwannahurl


    You can't cycle while intoxicated. Also, the use of the word "intoxicant" means that the legislation covers all drugs, not just alcohol. There is no alcohol/drug limit in place, which means that Garda has to form an opinion that you are intoxicated. They are entitled to ask you to perform an impairment test.



    This is news to me.

    Are impairment tests part of Irish road traffic legislation and policing?!

    I've never seen or heard of it here, but it seems to be standard practice in the US. It's a nonsense, imo, and no substitute for objective tests such as breathalysing.

    EDIT: just did a quick search,and it seems subjective impairment tests are needed because at present there are no technologies suitable for roadside chemical drug tests.

    http://www.thejournal.ie/drug-driving-laws-clampdown-leo-varadkar-644270-Oct2012/
    “This testing will consist of simple, physical, cognitive tests such as walking a straight line, tipping one’s nose or counting while standing on one leg.”


  • Registered Users Posts: 881 ✭✭✭ Bloodwing


    Iwannahurl wrote: »
    This is news to me.

    Are impairment tests part of Irish road traffic legislation and policing?!

    I've never seen or heard of it here, but it seems to be standard practice in the US. It's a nonsense, imo, and no substitute for objective tests such as breathalysing.

    Breath only shows alcohol, impairment tests can be used where drugs are suspected. It was brought in after the media gave drug driving a lot of attention.

    Edit: Damn your ninja edit!


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 8,156 Iwannahurl


    The Road Traffic (No. 2) Bill 2013 deals with impairment testing, but does not seem to be on the Statute yet.

    http://www.oireachtas.ie/viewdoc.asp?DocID=23910&&CatID=59

    Can any of you legal eagles enlighten me?

    EDIT: just realised that the above legislation (and Oireachtas webpage) is still a work in progress.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,169 ✭✭✭ enda1


    Iwannahurl wrote: »
    The Road Traffic (No. 2) Bill 2013 deals with impairment testing, but does not seem to be on the Statute yet.

    http://www.oireachtas.ie/viewdoc.asp?DocID=23910&&CatID=59

    Can any of you legal eagles enlighten me?

    Presumably the Garda can arrest you (similar for simple pedestrian public intoxication) on suspicion that you were drunk. The suspicion could be formed by an impairment test if they feel that would help or else by their judgement. Legislation would simply standardise procedures for assessing intoxication in circumstances where a breathalyser weren't present.


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  • Moderators, Motoring & Transport Moderators Posts: 13,989 Mod ✭✭✭✭ monument


    buffalo wrote: »
    Technically, yes. Here's a piece from the UK cycling lobby, CTC:

    (from http://www.ctc.org.uk/file/public/asls_0.pdf)

    I know it's UK law, but my reading of Irish law would be the same (NB, not a lawyer, government representative, etc.).

    Whatever about the ins and out of the law, I've been spotting more of the UK type entry point in cycle project designs over recent years -- and on larger roads, or where there's turning lanes, sometimes more than one entry point.


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