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What is the Best Classic Car to buy in Ireland

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  • Registered Users Posts: 4,499 ✭✭✭Capri


    2cv wrote: »
    :-)

    sorry 2CV - owned quite a few of them as well :rolleyes: - forget when I stopped counting my 'bargain purchases' but 2CV's were well represented (+ 1 Dyane )


  • Registered Users Posts: 42 Rudy Jakma


    All depends on what you want and what for. And on your budget.
    My current classic is a 1975 DAF. No, not a truck or a bus, a car.
    It is powered by a 1.3 Renault engine, similar to the one that went into the Renault 5.
    There are still sources for parts for this now rare classic. For engine parts (e.g. filters, plugs etc.) I just specify the R5.
    Pro: It runs well and is reliable enough. The body needs occasional attention. Most cars are not built to last more than 7 years. When you buy something 35 years old, or older and: still going, then you may assume that it probably has received better than average maintenance over the years but even so, count on regular work to keep it in shape.
    The choice will depend on what you want, your budget and, more importantly: what happens to be available for the right price.
    Unless of course you are able and willing to spend fortunes on rare classics. But I am only talking about cars that once graced the street in front of some proud, middle- class owner's home, the envy of his (sorry, rarely her) neighbours.
    If you do not need the car for daily transport, by all means select something a bit flashy. A boy's dream still remembered and suddenly available. But be careful: Many (including myself) got blinkered when we found the car that in our younger years was out of reach - totally - and now is up for sale for a price that you can just about afford now that your children have grown up.
    Often these cars present problems that even a thorough test drive will not reveal.
    So if you are looking for something that will give you a bit of fun and will remain affordable - and will not totally deplete your bank account, forcing a premature sale for next to nothing a short while after - then go for something modest and with technology that will allow you to locate spares. The older British cars have a lot of commonality, Austin - Morris became BMC Leyland and the A and B engines were used in many cars of the period, be it MG, Morris Minor, Austin A30, even Standard.
    Then there were Fords. The old Anglias were common as muck.
    Rover, less so but even so, parts are usually available.
    For all classics: Enquire first with a local club. Some models had specific weaknesses that experts in the club will find if you engage them.
    My own DAF has a peculiar automatic gear called "Variomatic". It transmits engine power through a system with belts and pulleys with varying diameter. It first came out in a small 600 cc car in 1959 but eventually DAF threw in the towel: they were too small to maintain a world-wide sales effort with corresponding dealer back-up. The automatic gear, an absolute jewel in it's day, made the car very suitable for the elderly so young people would not be seen dead in one. But they still have an acceleration that will make other road users gasp with surprise when moving off from traffic lights, especially if side-by-side on a dual carriageway.
    The belt-and-pulley gears allow the car to travel nearly as fast in reverse as forward and many surviving examples were eventually finished off in "demolition races" in reverse. Even though DAF cars are now very rare, spares back-up is good and they do not fetch big money.
    This was my rationale for buying a DAF, the reason for buying a classic is usually very cheap tax and insurance.
    So what are the cons?
    I have buried them in the above but mainly: Expect problems associated with ageing components.
    Expect rust and stay on top of anti-rust treatment.
    A classic in general needs more regular maintenance.
    If it requires restoration: Unless the car is a rare classic like a Rolls-Royce Silver Ghost, a Bugatti, a Bentley 4.5 litre or other exotic car, you can pour a fortune into it and never will get even a fraction back. So unless you have money to spare, or want to own and use the car for a long time NEVER ever buy a car that needs a lot of work. Worse, you will soon discover during the process that other areas will have to be tackled as well. Many classic cars become a bottomless money pit.
    My personal advise is: Accept that you may not be able to find the EXACT car of your dreams, or at least not for a price that is reasonable, and instead allow a compromise between it and a reasonably-priced and working car that once sold in the hundreds of thousands so that spares are still cheaply available.


  • Registered Users Posts: 246 ✭✭Capri86


    I miss my Capri. Was my every day runaround for over 2 years. Always brought a smile to my face. But without dry storage I watched as it suffered badly over those years. I couldn't keep on top of the work so it had to move on.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,901 ✭✭✭deckie27


    I've been running classics daily for years now
    I would not go for a UK (or ex) car unless it was restored properly or has a galvanised body. Over
    90% of UK classics i've seen turn out to be rotten.

    Don't mind people when they say don't get a classic if you don't have a garage to store and work on it. I've nine It would be nice but I know loads of people running classics with no indoor facilities. Classics if looked after should be no more unreliable that modern cars. In a lot of cases you will get more warning of problems gonna happen instead on it stopping on the road.


  • Registered Users Posts: 9,061 ✭✭✭Kenny Logins


    deckie27 wrote: »
    I've been running classics daily for years now
    I would not go for a UK (or ex) car unless it was restored properly or has a galvanised body. Over
    90% of UK classics i've seen turn out to be rotten.

    90% of mine were from UK, only one was ****. :p


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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,901 ✭✭✭deckie27


    90% of mine were from UK, only one was ****. :p

    Feck of Kenny. You haven't both 10 classics from the UK.


  • Registered Users Posts: 9,061 ✭✭✭Kenny Logins


    deckie27 wrote: »
    Feck of Kenny. You haven't both 10 classics from the UK.

    No, just 5. I lied about the 90%. :D


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,184 ✭✭✭Thinkingaboutit


    johnos1984 wrote: »
    If you have no storage for keeping the car and servicing the car in I just wouldn't get one. While I love classic cars they need constant attention

    There are older classics that get zinc primer, and there are enough cars old enough for classic insurance which were galvanised property in a non botched, non Italian way, say a Toyota Celica from the 90s or a Toyota Carina (even the older ones were rust free, say a Carina II from 1985) or a Honda NSX from the same era. Also a cover will suffice if a car is not too old. Hillman Avengers were good at avoiding rust, better than say FIAT Miafioris:D.


  • Registered Users Posts: 9,061 ✭✭✭Kenny Logins


    deckie27 wrote: »
    Feck of Kenny. You haven't both 10 classics from the UK.

    Just thinking, we've had a very similar car history -GT, wrong 'un, oval, westy and 924.. :pac:


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,830 ✭✭✭shawnee


    The choices are simple , buy one in Ireland which has been wrecked from potholes or bad roads and generally hasn't been looked after , alternatively buy one from UK that has service history (unknown in Ireland) and perhaps has been driven in UK where they look after the roads. This includes salting them when frosty . Personally I would examine the underside of the car and if it is not damaged would definitely buy UK.:P


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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,901 ✭✭✭deckie27


    Just thinking, we've had a very similar car history -GT, wrong 'un, oval, westy and 924.. :pac:

    Yip
    With the Westy been identical


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,033 ✭✭✭Silvera


    I've always liked Opel Manta B's (1975-1988 model)


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,308 ✭✭✭w124man


    deckie27 wrote: »
    Classics if looked after should be no more unreliable that modern cars.

    Emmm ..... really? :eek:


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,901 ✭✭✭deckie27


    w124man wrote: »
    Emmm ..... really? :eek:

    We'll in my experience of vw's and a Porsche 924


    Edit
    PS.
    I'm only realising this is an old thread.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,499 ✭✭✭Capri


    deckie27 wrote: »
    We'll in my experience of vw's and a Porsche 924


    Edit
    PS.
    I'm only realising this is an old thread.

    :P:P

    Could be a 'classic' thread :P:P:P:P


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,308 ✭✭✭w124man


    deckie27 wrote: »
    We'll in my experience of vw's and a Porsche 924


    Edit
    PS.
    I'm only realising this is an old thread.

    So a thirty year old Golf would do 60,000 miles in a year with only regular servicing?

    :eek:


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,358 ✭✭✭kev1.3s


    90% of mine were from UK, only one was ****. :p

    You rode those odds pretty well.

    I don't tend to listen to people who tell you that if you don't have a garage don't get a classic, a garage is a luxury a lot of people can't afford and that doesn't mean you should be excluded from classic car ownership but it would be advisable to find storage for the winter months if possible.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,901 ✭✭✭deckie27


    w124man wrote: »
    So a thirty year old Golf would do 60,000 miles in a year with only regular servicing?

    :eek:

    Ok

    It probably won't but people don't buy classics even in daily use it they intend to do 60000 miles a year


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,308 ✭✭✭w124man


    deckie27 wrote: »
    Ok

    It probably won't but people don't buy classics even in daily use it they intend to do 60000 miles a year

    Yeah I know. Just pushing .....

    Buy a Merc, VW, Porsche or a Toyota!


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 3,571 ✭✭✭newmug


    I have the same idea as the OP. I want a daily run-around car, but not one that will rob me with tax and insurance, and also one that looks cool! So I was thinking of buying a W123 or W124. They'd be modern enough to compete with newer cars, still considered to be high-end cars, and cheap to tax and insure. Am I right in saying it counts as a classic after 20 years, ie 1993?

    One thing that wrecks my head though, is the mileage. No car I've looked at yet has honest mileage. How can someone stand there and tell you that in its 23 years of life, this car has only done half the mileage of a 10 year-younger car? I do about 10k miles a year, that means a 23 year old car should have about 230,000miles on the clock. I think the highest I've seen was 160,000. How do they turn back the clock? Is it just that the car has done 1 million miles and gone right the way round again?


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  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 16,635 ✭✭✭✭dr.fuzzenstein


    w124man wrote: »
    So a thirty year old Golf would do 60,000 miles in a year with only regular servicing?

    :eek:

    If I had the choice between doing it in a 30 year old Golf or anything British Leyland of the same period, I'd take my chances with the Golf any day!:P


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,308 ✭✭✭w124man


    newmug wrote: »
    I have the same idea as the OP. I want a daily run-around car, but not one that will rob me with tax and insurance, and also one that looks cool! So I was thinking of buying a W123 or W124. They'd be modern enough to compete with newer cars, still considered to be high-end cars, and cheap to tax and insure. Am I right in saying it counts as a classic after 20 years, ie 1993?

    One thing that wrecks my head though, is the mileage. No car I've looked at yet has honest mileage. How can someone stand there and tell you that in its 23 years of life, this car has only done half the mileage of a 10 year-younger car? I do about 10k miles a year, that means a 23 year old car should have about 230,000miles on the clock. I think the highest I've seen was 160,000. How do they turn back the clock? Is it just that the car has done 1 million miles and gone right the way round again?

    No its 30 years! Yo will have to wait another 3 years for a W124. There are plenty of W124 cars with low mileage around. I have one with 86,000 and have owned it for 5 years


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 16,635 ✭✭✭✭dr.fuzzenstein


    w124man wrote: »
    No its 30 years! Yo will have to wait another 3 years for a W124. There are plenty of W124 cars with low mileage around. I have one with 86,000 and have owned it for 5 years

    You own a W124? I am genuinely surprised. :P:cool:


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,308 ✭✭✭w124man


    Hehe .....

    I own three ..... And just for good measure, a W126!


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