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Canada: Immigration Advice

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Comments

  • Closed Accounts Posts: 75 ✭✭✭ rjessome


    baraca wrote: »
    Hey rjessome, Great service and thanks for answering our questions. Hopefully mine is pretty straightforward.

    Me and my girlfriend and our 2 year old son are planning on going to canada maybe early next year. I'm just wondering will we have a problem applying for our IEC visa with our son? Will he require a separate visa? Or will he go under ours?

    Also can you apply for a second year IEC visa when your first year is up? We are planning on doing this and then hopefully trying to gain PR through the PNP at some stage during our second year.

    Thanks.

    Hi,

    You do understand that you and your girlfriend will EACH have to apply for your own IEC permits? Your son will be able to enter Canada as a visitor. He will not be granted any status based on either of your IEC permits. There shouldn't be a problem with him entering but the maximum length of time he will be allocated to stay will be 6 months when you enter at the port of entry to Canada. However, you can apply to extend his visitor status when it comes close to the end of the 6 months. Just make sure that you maintain his legal status while in Canada.

    Hope that helps.

    rjessome


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,458 ppink


    Hi
    do you have any idea how long after positive LMO is the temp work permit issued. It is intended to get it at point of entry- is that immediate or is there a time line?


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 75 ✭✭✭ rjessome


    ppink wrote: »
    Hi
    do you have any idea how long after positive LMO is the temp work permit issued. It is intended to get it at point of entry- is that immediate or is there a time line?

    LMOs have a 6 month expiry which means that the selected worker must apply for the work permit within 6 months from the issuance of the LMO. If an applicant who is visa exempt applies upon entry armed with their contract and LMO, the work permit is issued right away assuming they meet all of the admissibility conditions that any person entering Canada meets. The only catch would be that working in certain occupations (some areas of health care, with children, etc.) require ALL workers to have an immigration medical exam done before applying for the work permit. However, MOST jobs do not have this requirement.

    So in answer to your question, if you meet the above conditions the work permit is issued immediately after you are examined and approved by the immigration officer at the port of entry to Canada.

    rjessome


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,050 token101


    rjessome wrote: »
    Hi. This is a question I get asked all the time. But put the focus on yourself, your skills and abilities. The wonderful thing about IEC is it gives you a chance to PROVE your worth to employers. It's an open permit so you are free to find a job and employer that suits you. You are also free to be promoted and moved around within a company. Employers are often intimidated by the LMO process especially for untested workers. BUT what I see is that once they "fall in love" with an employee who has shown their worth, they will bend over backwards to keep them, including doing LMOs, PNPs, etc. So look at it like YOUR opportunity to show them how valuable you are to their business. No company wants to lose a key employee.

    All the professional jobs are NOT in Toronto! While it is Canada's largest city it is by no means the only place to find professional employment! Cities all across Canada employ professionals and there are plenty of opportunities in ANY Canadian city. Think about it. All companies, no matter what their end product or service, require skilled administrative, financial and sales management. Sorry but I get really annoyed when I hear people say "all the jobs are in Toronto". Cities like Edmonton, Calgary, Vancouver, Winnipeg, Saskatoon, etc. ALSO need professionals.

    Hope that helps.

    rjessome


    Hi,

    The advice is really appreciated, I suppose what I was really thinking is that Toronto is a lot bigger, and I'd have the best chance there as opposed to somewhere smaller. But I really appreciate the answer. :)

    Regards,
    token101


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,050 token101


    I do have one other question actually if you don't mind answering if you know. There's a programme called Career Bridge that's for recent immigrants to Canada looking for Canadian experience:

    https://www.careerbridge.ca/en/home

    It's mostly internships as far as I know, but would you know if it is open to IEC applicants? I've sent emails and even asked on Twitter but got no response, which makes me think the answer is no! I know there are other placement type programmes that are only open to Federal Skilled Workers, but it doesn't say anywhere on this that IEC applicants are excluded. And even in the little questionnaire IEC applicants would seem to tick the boxes.

    If you have any info I'd be grateful, thanks :)


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 75 ✭✭✭ rjessome


    token101 wrote: »
    I do have one other question actually if you don't mind answering if you know. There's a programme called Career Bridge that's for recent immigrants to Canada looking for Canadian experience:

    https://www.careerbridge.ca/en/home

    It's mostly internships as far as I know, but would you know if it is open to IEC applicants? I've sent emails and even asked on Twitter but got no response, which makes me think the answer is no! I know there are other placement type programmes that are only open to Federal Skilled Workers, but it doesn't say anywhere on this that IEC applicants are excluded. And even in the little questionnaire IEC applicants would seem to tick the boxes.

    If you have any info I'd be grateful, thanks :)

    Hi,

    I looked at this website and I think I found your answer in their FAQs.

    Who is eligible for Career Edge Organization’s paid internship programs?
    • recent graduates from accredited Canadian colleges and universities who do not have significant work experience in their chosen field, and are looking for a paid internship within a non-regulated business function including Marketing, Human Resources, Finance, Business, Information Technology, Engineering, Operations and Sales.
    • graduates with self-declared disabilities from accredited Canadian colleges and universities who do not have significant work experience in their chosen field, and are looking for a paid internship within a non-regulated business function including Marketing, Human Resources, Finance, Business, Information Technology, Engineering, Operations and Sales.
    • internationally qualified professionals who have been in Canada for less than three years, are legally able to work in Canada, have a minimum of a bachelor’s degree with Canadian equivalency assessment and do not have Canadian work experience in their chosen professional field.
    So it seems to me that a person arriving with an IEC permit might be eligible but there is no guaranteed placement AND you MUST have your credentials professionally assessed through one of the approved assessment organizations. But the key is that you must be IN Canada to apply.

    Hope that helps.

    Roxanne


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,050 token101


    rjessome wrote: »
    Hi,

    I looked at this website and I think I found your answer in their FAQs.

    Who is eligible for Career Edge Organization’s paid internship programs?
    • recent graduates from accredited Canadian colleges and universities who do not have significant work experience in their chosen field, and are looking for a paid internship within a non-regulated business function including Marketing, Human Resources, Finance, Business, Information Technology, Engineering, Operations and Sales.
    • graduates with self-declared disabilities from accredited Canadian colleges and universities who do not have significant work experience in their chosen field, and are looking for a paid internship within a non-regulated business function including Marketing, Human Resources, Finance, Business, Information Technology, Engineering, Operations and Sales.
    • internationally qualified professionals who have been in Canada for less than three years, are legally able to work in Canada, have a minimum of a bachelor’s degree with Canadian equivalency assessment and do not have Canadian work experience in their chosen professional field.
    So it seems to me that a person arriving with an IEC permit might be eligible but there is no guaranteed placement AND you MUST have your credentials professionally assessed through one of the approved assessment organizations. But the key is that you must be IN Canada to apply.

    Hope that helps.

    Roxanne

    Yeah I knew you had to be in Canada, but I'd feel I'd have more chance with an organisation like this than going it alone. As long as the assessment doesn't cost a fortune I'd be ok with that. I'm glad you came to the same conclusion as me anyway! Hopefully it's right! Cheers anyway :)


  • Registered Users Posts: 10 ✭✭✭ nimar


    Hi rjessome,

    Thanks in advance for volunteering your knowledge on this forum! :) I have 2 questions if that's OK.

    1) My husband and I are currently in Toronto on the IEC work permits. We've applied for the permanent resident visa (with my husband as the main applicant) under the skilled worker with "arranged employment" category (as my husband is currently in a permanent job here with his employer who want him to remain in that role permanently). This application has recently been refused, and the reason that was given is that my husband is not currently on a valid work permit to apply under this category! We cannot find anywhere on the site where it says that you can't apply for a permanent visa while currently here on the IEC open work permit. Do you know of any rules around this, or could this be a mistake on the part of CIC?

    2) Because our current IEC permits expire at the end of this year, we are now looking to go down the LMO route with our employers. However, in September I will have 2 years of Canadian work experience under my belt as a Project Manager (with a total of 13 years of experience in this field). Because of the recent permanent application rejection, and the need for LMO's, I was thinking of applying for the permanent visa under the Canadian Experience Class category. Having looked into this further, it seems that your job and experience must be in the NOC category 0, A or B in order to be eligible. The only project management roles that are listed in these categories are for construction or interior design! There is nothing for general project managers within the IT, web or graphic design industries! Does that mean that I will not be able to apply for the Canadian Experience Class visa?

    Thanks in advance!


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 75 ✭✭✭ rjessome


    nimar wrote: »
    Hi rjessome,

    Thanks in advance for volunteering your knowledge on this forum! :) I have 2 questions if that's OK.

    1) My husband and I are currently in Toronto on the IEC work permits. We've applied for the permanent resident visa (with my husband as the main applicant) under the skilled worker with "arranged employment" category (as my husband is currently in a permanent job here with his employer who want him to remain in that role permanently). This application has recently been refused, and the reason that was given is that my husband is not currently on a valid work permit to apply under this category! We cannot find anywhere on the site where it says that you can't apply for a permanent visa while currently here on the IEC open work permit. Do you know of any rules around this, or could this be a mistake on the part of CIC?

    2) Because our current IEC permits expire at the end of this year, we are now looking to go down the LMO route with our employers. However, in September I will have 2 years of Canadian work experience under my belt as a Project Manager (with a total of 13 years of experience in this field). Because of the recent permanent application rejection, and the need for LMO's, I was thinking of applying for the permanent visa under the Canadian Experience Class category. Having looked into this further, it seems that your job and experience must be in the NOC category 0, A or B in order to be eligible. The only project management roles that are listed in these categories are for construction or interior design! There is nothing for general project managers within the IT, web or graphic design industries! Does that mean that I will not be able to apply for the Canadian Experience Class visa?

    Thanks in advance!

    Hi,

    1. Unfortunately, CIC's decision to refuse is correct. AE (Arranged Employment) in the FSW (Federal Skilled Worker) category requires that the work permit either be issued through an LMO, intra-company transfer, CIC approved LMO exempt program specific to certain occupations, or through international trade agreements like NAFTA, GATS, etc. IEC and WHV permits are considered reciprocal exchange programs and are NOT included under Section 204 and 205 of the Regulations which define the type of work permit required for AE. If the job offer had been confirmed by HRSDC and resulted in an AEO (Arranged Employment Opinion), then it would have worked.

    2. Your work experience would qualify for CEC assuming you have the correct number of months (24) AND hours (3900) and the job is in the correct skill level (0, A or B). You are going to have to find the NOC Code or codes that best describe your daily work. Look at 0213 or 2171 to start. Sometimes it can be the combination of two codes that work best. I've done that before where an applicant couldn't find just one code that fit their job. It was accepted by CIC. You will also have to take the IELTS GENERAL test to prove you meet the minimum language requirements for your job level as indicated in the Regulations.

    You understand that you will still require LMOs to be able to continue working in Canada. A CEC or FSW application in process will not maintain your status as a worker. However, if both of you are in skill level 0, A or B positions then only one of you needs to get a positive LMO. The other will be able to get another open work permit as the dependent spouse of the skilled worker. Advise the employer to apply for the LMO early, at least 4 months and preferrably 6 months in advance of the current expiry of your permits. It is taking a really LONG time to get LMOs these days.

    Good luck.

    Roxanne


  • Registered Users Posts: 10 ✭✭✭ nimar


    Hi rjessome,

    Thanks so much for your quick and concise response. This is super helpful! :)

    Nimar


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  • Registered Users Posts: 22 ✭✭✭ fonzy72


    Hi rjessome ,

    I hope you have a trick up your sleeve for this one and thanks for all the great advice thus far.
    My partner and I are heading to Calgary in a few months. I have the IEC visa she has no visa as she is over 35 and does not qualify for the federal skilled worker visa. I know she can come with me and not work, which we can financially afford but my fear is that she'll go crazy with nothing to do everyday.

    So the questions I have are many, if you wouldn't mind answering any of them I'd really appreciate it.

    Do we need to apply for the temporary resident visa from this side for her.?

    If she applies for the open work permit from this side, what are her chances of getting it on grounds of stir crazy ness?!

    She used to work for a multinational here for many years, is it a good idea to apply with them from this side? If she is not successful, is she gonna get stopped crossing the border and sent home?

    She would also qualify for the PNP as do I but you need to work in that trade first, is there anyway around that for her or should I switch my visa as soon as I have worked the appropriate number of months.

    We are registered as common law partners, if that's of any help. I just want to be as transparent as possible as we do want to stay long term but I don't want either of us to get stopped from the initial experience.

    Sorry for all the questions, as I said any help is better than no help.

    Thanks


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 75 ✭✭✭ rjessome


    fonzy72 wrote: »
    Hi rjessome ,

    I hope you have a trick up your sleeve for this one and thanks for all the great advice thus far.
    My partner and I are heading to Calgary in a few months. I have the IEC visa she has no visa as she is over 35 and does not qualify for the federal skilled worker visa. I know she can come with me and not work, which we can financially afford but my fear is that she'll go crazy with nothing to do everyday.

    So the questions I have are many, if you wouldn't mind answering any of them I'd really appreciate it.

    Do we need to apply for the temporary resident visa from this side for her.?

    If she applies for the open work permit from this side, what are her chances of getting it on grounds of stir crazy ness?!

    She used to work for a multinational here for many years, is it a good idea to apply with them from this side? If she is not successful, is she gonna get stopped crossing the border and sent home?

    She would also qualify for the PNP as do I but you need to work in that trade first, is there anyway around that for her or should I switch my visa as soon as I have worked the appropriate number of months.

    We are registered as common law partners, if that's of any help. I just want to be as transparent as possible as we do want to stay long term but I don't want either of us to get stopped from the initial experience.

    Sorry for all the questions, as I said any help is better than no help.

    Thanks

    Hi,

    I will do my best to answer.

    First of all, as I've explained in a previous post, people from the UK and Ireland are visa exempt for Canada. A visa is a travel document confirming that you will be allowed entry into a country. It is used mainly to board airplanes. If you are no visa exempt to Canada, no airline will let you board a flight to Canada because they will have to return you to your point of origin at THEIR cost.

    1. As soon as your partner tries to enter Canada as a visitor, that act itself is an "application" to become a temporary resident. Assuming she is an Irish or UK citizen, she does not require a visa to travel to Canada.

    2. No chance whatsoever for her to be able to get an open work permit if you are on an IEC permit.

    3. If the company in Ireland has an office in Calgary that requires someone with her skill set AND they are not able to find a Canadian citizen or permanent resident who can fit the requirements for the job, they could apply for an LMO (Labour Market Opinion) to hire her. If she is still working for this company in a management position and they want to transfer her to the office in Calgary, she "may" be eligible to come and work as an intra-company transferee. That would require further study that I cannot provide on an internet forum for general information.

    4. Part of qualifying for the Alberta Immigrant Nominee Program (AINP) is that she must have an employer in Alberta willing to support her application by offering her a full-time, permanent job in a skill level 0, A or B position. Unless she has that (and you too) she does NOT qualify for AINP. There is no way around that. However, if you are supported by an employer for AINP and approved, then you can change your work permit to a closed permit (only work for one employer) and she would be eligible to apply for an open work permit as your dependent common-law partner.

    5. Being registered as common-law partners does not help. But it doesn't hurt either. The requirement to be considered common-law in Canada is residing together in a conjugal (marriage like) relationship for 12 consecutive months with the intent to remain together in this relationship.

    Overall, in order for your partner to be eligible to work in Canada, she requires an employer with an LMO who is willing to hire her or you would need to switch your permit to one that is LMO based or AINP based. She can volunteer BUT there are specific requirements for that. She can ONLY volunteer at a company or organization where the work is done mainly by unpaid volunteers. An example would be a food bank or homeless shelter. She cannot volunteer to do work that would normally be paid. So she could not volunteer as an accountant for a company that doesn't normally have volunteers doing that work. I hope you understand what I mean.

    Best of luck.

    Roxanne


  • Registered Users Posts: 22 ✭✭✭ fonzy72


    Thanks so much, I really appreciate it.


  • Registered Users Posts: 67 ✭✭✭ cmrm


    hi Roxanne,

    Thanks for doing this thread, reading all your replies has been very helpful but I would like some advice if you can find the time?


    http://www.boards.ie/vbulletin/showthread.php?t=2056578617

    I posted this thread earlier and I think I know the answer to the first question after reading one of your replies.
    My wife & kids would go as visitors to Canada with me and have to renew before the 6 months were up?
    so would we need to show we had a certain amount of money to sustain ourselves over there?
    Is it easy to renew the visitor permit every 6 months? We wanted to at least stay for 2 years if we could.

    thanks again
    D


  • Registered Users Posts: 5 ✭✭✭ number11


    Hi rjessome, thank you for all your advice so far. i really hope you may be able to help me out. basically i don't have any serious qualifications, just a diploma in psychology which probably isn't worth the paper it's wrote on! i have five years of work experience as a clerical officer in the Irish government. i am currently on the IEC programme in nova scotia and am applying for my second IEC participation as my current one expires in june.
    i really want to stay here on a permanent basis because of a certain girl and all that!
    do i have any options? do you think i could get a low skilled LMO and then apply for a temporary work permit which would lead to permanent resdincy?? or should i resign myself to the thought of having to leave this beautiful country at the end of my second year? any help on this matter would be greatly appreciated! thanks


  • Registered Users Posts: 11,989 ✭✭✭✭ retalivity


    number11 wrote: »
    i really want to stay here on a permanent basis because of a certain girl and all that!

    Shotgun wedding


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 75 ✭✭✭ rjessome


    cmrm wrote: »
    hi Roxanne,

    Thanks for doing this thread, reading all your replies has been very helpful but I would like some advice if you can find the time?


    http://www.boards.ie/vbulletin/showthread.php?t=2056578617

    I posted this thread earlier and I think I know the answer to the first question after reading one of your replies.
    My wife & kids would go as visitors to Canada with me and have to renew before the 6 months were up?
    so would we need to show we had a certain amount of money to sustain ourselves over there?
    Is it easy to renew the visitor permit every 6 months? We wanted to at least stay for 2 years if we could.

    thanks again
    D

    Hi,

    I am cutting and pasting your questions from the other thread to give consistency:

    1. Im the only one going to be working (electrician) so my wife & kids can come on my IEC but have to fill out a Application & Declaration form for each family member, is this right? Or do I just fill it out and I put them in the Family Information Form? or is there some other form I havent seen yet?

    2. Do we just pay the one fee of 110euro for all of us (since im the only one working)?

    3. I know we will need evidence of having $2500 available to us to cover the first few months, do we each need that amount -so about $10000 altogether?

    1. You just fill out the family information form. Your wife would require her own IEC application if she is eligible. You don't say how old your kids are? If they are school age, they will require study permits. Those are separate applications with separate fees. If not, your wife and kids can only enter as visitors. The maximum amount of time they would be given to stay is 6 months. They would need to renew their status before it expires to be able to stay.

    2. One fee if the children don't need study permits.

    3. You need AT LEAST $2500 plus health insurance. But if you have a family of 4, I would be prepared to show the officer at the port of entry significantly more money to show you can support yourselves if you are all arriving together. There is no actual number I can give you but more is better. And I would ensure that your family has health insurance for at least 6 months as well.

    There could be a problem if your wife and kids don't have return tickets as well. If the officer at the port of entry thinks they intend to overstay as visitors, they can be refused entry.

    Have you considered coming on your own first? Electricians are in demand and you may be able to quickly switch your permit to either an LMO based permit or through a provincial nominee program if you have a willing employer. I would also say that your best bet to find that kind of employer would be in BC, Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba. If you were able to do that, then your wife and children would be eligible for permits giving them status as your dependents and would not have to go through the hassle of renewing visitor permits. Just a thought.

    Roxanne


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,458 ppink


    Roxanne can I just ask you what percentage of LMO's get turned down? I was offered a job by a company who have applied for an LMO for me. The lawyers gave me a timeline of May/June but I am wondering what are the chances of it being negative?


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 75 ✭✭✭ rjessome


    number11 wrote: »
    Hi rjessome, thank you for all your advice so far. i really hope you may be able to help me out. basically i don't have any serious qualifications, just a diploma in psychology which probably isn't worth the paper it's wrote on! i have five years of work experience as a clerical officer in the Irish government. i am currently on the IEC programme in nova scotia and am applying for my second IEC participation as my current one expires in june.
    i really want to stay here on a permanent basis because of a certain girl and all that!
    do i have any options? do you think i could get a low skilled LMO and then apply for a temporary work permit which would lead to permanent resdincy?? or should i resign myself to the thought of having to leave this beautiful country at the end of my second year? any help on this matter would be greatly appreciated! thanks

    Hi,

    Well, you do have a few options to consider. The Nova Scotia Nominee Program will allow employers to support applications for low and semi-skilled workers IF they can show a demand in the labour market as well as having made genuine attempts to recruit Canadian citizen and permanent resident workers but have been unable to do so. It's not easy to provide adequate proof of this and you MUST have a willing employer. You also have to worked for the sponsoring employer in Nova Scotia for at least 6 months. You can read more about this program here:
    http://novascotiaimmigration.ca/immigrants/immigrating-to-ns/skilled-worker

    The other option would be dependent upon how serious the relationship between you and this girl is. Shotgun wedding aside, if you get married OR live together in a marriage like relationship for 12 consecutive months, and the girl is willing, she may apply to sponsor you as her spouse or common-law partner in the Family Class. There are pros and cons to this as well as many changes are taking place regarding the immigration laws of this program. However, it is an option BUT only one you should consider if you are in a SERIOUS relationship. The relationship MUST come first and immigration second.

    I do a lot of provincial nominee applications as well as sponsorships. I sponsored my own husband to Canada. You can send me a private message if you need a little more information.

    Roxanne


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 75 ✭✭✭ rjessome


    ppink wrote: »
    Roxanne can I just ask you what percentage of LMO's get turned down? I was offered a job by a company who have applied for an LMO for me. The lawyers gave me a timeline of May/June but I am wondering what are the chances of it being negative?

    Hi,

    I'm sure there are statistsics somewhere about that but I don't have them. But the easy answer is 100% approval if there is a genuine need for the worker and the employer meets or exceeds the criteria. And 100% refusal if there is not a genuine need or the employer doesn't meet the criteria.

    I don't mean to be cheeky (well maybe a little) but each application is considered on it's own merits. So statistics of approval/refusal rates are a lot of junk because they can't factor this into the numbers.

    If the application is well prepared AND there is a genuine need AND the employer meets the criteria, the application should be approved. If any of these fall short, then it will be refused.

    Good luck.

    Roxanne


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  • Registered Users Posts: 1 flamadiddle


    Hello Roxanne, and my very warm thanks to you for taking the time to present this wonderfully clear advice.

    I’m a 46 year old Red Seal -qualified electrician; and I have related and extracurricular qualifications, courses, safety tickets, etc up to my eyeballs. I’m healthy (I hope) and can even speak, read and write a little French. People I know have even remarked on my passing familiarity with English. I have no criminal record; nor have I been ever been accused of a crime, nor suspected of one (nor committed one, for that matter). In other words, I have enough points. On paper.

    I’ve worked in a lot countries over the years - Ireland, England, The Netherlands, Norway, France, South Africa - including a little-known place up North known as Canada. In fact, I’ll be starting work again in Alberta in a couple of weeks as a Temporary Foreign Worker on the LMO/Work Permit system. And my soon-to-be employer has hinted, should our relationship prove mutually satisfactory, at sponsorship.

    Here’s my problem. I was told recently, at an informal consultation with a Canadian immigration attorney, that unless I can literally document (yes, literally, with documents) my entire work history since leaving school, that I’ll have NO chance at gaining permanent residency in Canada. (Tip to young potential emigrants: Document everything. DEMAND a paper trail). It is literally impossible for me to do this (but I can do it for the last twelve years).

    Is my dream of permanent residency in Canada scuppered by my itinerant lifestyle?

    Kind Regards,

    An idiot.


  • Registered Users Posts: 104 ✭✭ shannon guy


    Hi,

    Myself and my polish partner are travelling to Saskatoon as I have a job offer over there.

    I am currently doing up the application for the SINP skilled worker with job offer.

    We have to send everything to saskimmigration for them to nominate. then when we get a reply we continue to applying to the high commission in London.
    They advised that we should be able to get a temporary work permit while waiting on our residency (roughly 18 months they said).

    How long does it normally take for the work permit take to come through.
    And my partner is hoping for the open work permit, does this take the same ammount of time?

    The sask government have been very helpful anyway, but it would be nice to get more info.

    Also, the price of the permit is $150 each and the residency is $550 each.

    Is this refundable if the application is denied?

    Thank you for your help


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 75 ✭✭✭ rjessome


    Hello Roxanne, and my very warm thanks to you for taking the time to present this wonderfully clear advice.

    I’m a 46 year old Red Seal -qualified electrician; and I have related and extracurricular qualifications, courses, safety tickets, etc up to my eyeballs. I’m healthy (I hope) and can even speak, read and write a little French. People I know have even remarked on my passing familiarity with English. I have no criminal record; nor have I been ever been accused of a crime, nor suspected of one (nor committed one, for that matter). In other words, I have enough points. On paper.

    I’ve worked in a lot countries over the years - Ireland, England, The Netherlands, Norway, France, South Africa - including a little-known place up North known as Canada. In fact, I’ll be starting work again in Alberta in a couple of weeks as a Temporary Foreign Worker on the LMO/Work Permit system. And my soon-to-be employer has hinted, should our relationship prove mutually satisfactory, at sponsorship.

    Here’s my problem. I was told recently, at an informal consultation with a Canadian immigration attorney, that unless I can literally document (yes, literally, with documents) my entire work history since leaving school, that I’ll have NO chance at gaining permanent residency in Canada. (Tip to young potential emigrants: Document everything. DEMAND a paper trail). It is literally impossible for me to do this (but I can do it for the last twelve years).

    Is my dream of permanent residency in Canada scuppered by my itinerant lifestyle?

    Kind Regards,

    An idiot.

    Well, I wouldn't call you an idiot! Here's the deal. You have to be able to prove your skilled work experience to a certain extent. But that doesn't mean you have to PROVE every job since you were 18. And it seems to me that Canadian lawyer was incorrect in stating that you have to PROVE all of this since you were 18 as the applications forms have been modified in the last 12 months to require the last 10 years of work experience. Who says lawyers are better than consultants, eh???

    You have options. If I were you I would consider AINP over FSW. The requirements are similar BUT different enough including the amount of paper that must be produced. And as I've said before on this thread, the provincial nominee programs are better in general than federal skilled worker.

    Here's the tricky thing about Canadian applications for permanent residence. You have to have a good memory! In some cases you only have to prove a certain amount of work experience but you have to RECALL at least 10 years AND you have to RECALL your addresses since you were 18. Good thing I was born here! There was a span of 3 years where I moved 8 times!

    Roxanne


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 75 ✭✭✭ rjessome


    Hi,

    Myself and my polish partner are travelling to Saskatoon as I have a job offer over there.

    I am currently doing up the application for the SINP skilled worker with job offer.

    We have to send everything to saskimmigration for them to nominate. then when we get a reply we continue to applying to the high commission in London.
    They advised that we should be able to get a temporary work permit while waiting on our residency (roughly 18 months they said).

    How long does it normally take for the work permit take to come through.
    And my partner is hoping for the open work permit, does this take the same ammount of time?

    The sask government have been very helpful anyway, but it would be nice to get more info.

    Also, the price of the permit is $150 each and the residency is $550 each.

    Is this refundable if the application is denied?

    Thank you for your help

    Hi,

    Yes, after you receive the Nomination you can apply for a work permit but since you are visa exempt, you can apply upon entry to Canada. You don't have to go through CHC London. Have you and your partner lived together as a couple for at least 12 months? That is the requirement to be considered common-law for Canada if you are not married. And if your partner has a bio-metric passport, they can be issued the Open Work Permit at the port of entry as well. You should have a Statutory Declaration of Common Law Union with you when you enter as well as your SINP approval. The Stat Dec is here: http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/pdf/kits/forms/IMM5409E.PDF

    Application fees are not refundable and it is $150 EACH for the work permits and $550 EACH for the PR applications.

    Roxanne


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 11 ✭✭✭ tfc484


    Hi Rjessome
    I sent my application off weeks ago and got a acknowledgment receipt telling me I would be contacted within 2 weeks. It has been almost 4 weeks and I have yet to hear word. Do you think this is the result of a back log or my application been rejected. Anyone else in a similar boat?


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,050 token101


    tfc484 wrote: »
    Hi Rjessome
    I sent my application off weeks ago and got a acknowledgment receipt telling me I would be contacted within 2 weeks. It has been almost 4 weeks and I have yet to hear word. Do you think this is the result of a back log or my application been rejected. Anyone else in a similar boat?

    Yeah it's normal, well normal for them anyway. They're appallingly slow and extremely inefficient. I've been waiting since the 24th February. Pathetic system.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,540 ✭✭✭ freeze4real


    Hi rjessome,

    I'm in my teens studying economics in college will. E graduating next year. I would like to relocate to Canada but how can I do so.

    I have no suitable work experience in relation to my degre.

    Thanks.


  • Registered Users Posts: 104 ✭✭ shannon guy


    rjessome wrote: »
    Hi,

    Yes, after you receive the Nomination you can apply for a work permit but since you are visa exempt, you can apply upon entry to Canada. You don't have to go through CHC London. Have you and your partner lived together as a couple for at least 12 months? That is the requirement to be considered common-law for Canada if you are not married. And if your partner has a bio-metric passport, they can be issued the Open Work Permit at the port of entry as well. You should have a Statutory Declaration of Common Law Union with you when you enter as well as your SINP approval. The Stat Dec is here: http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/pdf/kits/forms/IMM5409E.PDF

    Application fees are not refundable and it is $150 EACH for the work permits and $550 EACH for the PR applications.

    Roxanne

    Would it be best to apply for work permit before going tho? When I go i need to start work very soon after.

    Yes we have our common law union form signed and stamped so thats not an issue.

    Does it take long for the work permit to come through after you have applied to CIC?


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 11 ✭✭✭ tfc484


    Thanks for that.

    Was begining to get worried.


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 75 ✭✭✭ rjessome


    token101 wrote: »
    Yeah it's normal, well normal for them anyway. They're appallingly slow and extremely inefficient. I've been waiting since the 24th February. Pathetic system.

    To be fair, CIC is absolutely inundated with applications at much higher levels than we've seen in recent history. And they do not have the budget to hire more people to process the higher volume of applications. Patience is a virtue, ESPECIALLY in immigration to Canada. That's just life.

    Roxanne


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