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Leak in hot press.

  • 08-01-2012 10:29pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 38 ✭✭✭ ieoinu


    My head is melted cos I've a leak in my hot press. My tank is insulated and sits on the floor under the stairs. I noticed a damp patch underneath it and looked at all the fitting but none were damp. The patch seemed to dry up. But has come back now and is worse. I can't find where it's coming from. I've run the heating to see if it's a leak on that circuit but none of the fittings appear to be leaking. What are the chances of the tank itself leaking. Its hard to tell as the tank is covered in the foam insulation and sits directly on the concrete. Anybody have any advice as to how to work out where it's coming from? Due to the international financial crisis, I am unable to employ a plumber. Thanks in advance:)


Comments

  • Closed Accounts Posts: 180 ✭✭ oikster


    Your cylinder should not be sitting on the floor. It should be on something like 2x1 battens to leave an airflow underneath it. Chances are that it has failed at a seam because of this. Worst case is a new cylinder.:(


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,708 ✭✭✭ Curly Judge


    I think you are referring to your hot water cylinder and not your tank.
    If I'm correct in that, the first place I would look is around the immersion heater on the top of the cylinder.
    These type of insulated cylinder are notoriously difficult to do fault fining on and I wish you luck.
    This cylinder should not be sitting on a concrete floor, for a start.
    The fact that it is probably has something to do with the leaking.
    These cylinders are normally made of copper and it could be taken out and the hole, [probably around the bottom rim] soldered or brazed.
    That would be a job for a plumber, or at the very least, a very handy person.
    Sorry I do not have any better news


  • Registered Users Posts: 38 ✭✭✭ ieoinu


    I'm in the house nearly six years (bought new), would I have any comeback on the builder/plumber?


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 180 ✭✭ oikster


    Soldering a hole in the base of a cylinder is only a stopgap as the leak will occur again only further along the seam. To repair the leak means removing the cylinder and removing some of the insulation from it to expose and repair said leak. The cylinder then has to be refitted except on new battens which changes the height and therefore means pipework alterations. A lot of work for something that I can guarantee you will leak again. If it is a leak at the seam bite the bullet and replace the cylinder.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 180 ✭✭ oikster


    ieoinu wrote: »
    I'm in the house nearly six years (bought new), would I have any comeback on the builder/plumber?



    You could try the builder as this was not properly installed.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 7,501 ✭✭✭ Outkast_IRE


    oikster wrote: »
    Your cylinder should not be sitting on the floor. It should be on something like 2x1 battens to leave an airflow underneath it. Chances are that it has failed at a seam because of this. Worst case is a new cylinder.:(
    where have you gotten the information that the cylinder must be raised off the floor on battons for purposes of airflow underneath , i have never come across this information ? Is there a link or something you can provide just out of curiosity?


  • Registered Users Posts: 38 ✭✭✭ ieoinu


    oikster wrote: »
    You could try the builder as this was not properly installed.

    Are there any regulations that I could quote about this?


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 180 ✭✭ oikster


    where have you gotten the information that the cylinder must be raised off the floor on battons for purposes of airflow underneath , i have never come across this information ? Is there a link or something you can provide just out of curiosity?


    Standard practice to stop condensation which over time will cause corrosion


  • Registered Users Posts: 7,501 ✭✭✭ Outkast_IRE


    oikster wrote: »
    Standard practice to stop condensation which over time will cause corrosion
    Corrosion on the copper? , The welds also shouldnt corrode , So what exactly are you stopping the corrosion on ?


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 180 ✭✭ oikster


    Corrosion on the copper? , The welds also shouldnt corrode , So what exactly are you stopping the corrosion on ?

    A copper cylinder sitting on damp concrete will corrode. I have seen this many times. Just common sense and good practice to allow air underneath to keep it dry and take it away from the rough surface.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 7,501 ✭✭✭ Outkast_IRE


    oikster wrote: »
    A copper cylinder sitting on damp concrete will corrode. I have seen this many times. Just common sense and good practice to allow air underneath to keep it dry and take it away from the rough surface.
    Damp Concrete oh ya quite right, for some reason i had it in my head of a cylinder on floorboards like in many homes. It just didnt click with me :D


  • Registered Users Posts: 38 ✭✭✭ ieoinu


    Will try the builder to see if I can get anywhere with him. Thanks for the replies


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,789 ✭✭✭ slavetothegrind


    also check the joint where the heating circuit enters the cylinder for weeping there, if you disturb the pipework it can weep at that bulkhead fitting

    You may have to scrape off some of the insulation to see this


  • Registered Users Posts: 12 ✭✭✭ brianwarren


    HI, I have a cousin who is a plummer, jack of all trader builder. S##t Hot!!!
    I have a Copper Hot Water tank with a leak as well.
    When the cousin saw how it was fitted the first thing he said was that it should have been fitted on a fixing off the concrete floor. Concrete is bad news for copper. There are a few articles regarding this on the Internet.
    I live in an apartment which has a block insurance which I am hoping will cover the re instillation of the tank properly. If you have home insurance you should look at your cover. If you can contact the Builder, and he is not a gangster, your property should have a 10 year bond for construction issues. Don't quote me, but it should.


  • Hosted Moderators Posts: 3,496 ✭✭✭ DGOBS


    I am sure they may have resolved this in the year and eight months since it was first posted?!?


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 2,008 scudo2


    where have you gotten the information that the cylinder must be raised off the floor on battons for purposes of airflow underneath , i have never come across this information ? Is there a link or something you can provide just out of curiosity?


    Common practice due to un level floors, pebbles in concrete, reaction against concrete and allowing ventulation to base of cylindre. I don't know the rule as to building regs but this is what we have been thought by wise old plumbers and always have done.

    Same problem with "GRANT" oil boilers ( Which are among the best in MOP) except for the flat base that rusts if not put up on blocks where possible. At least "Firebird" boilers have legs.:)


  • Hosted Moderators Posts: 3,496 ✭✭✭ DGOBS


    Reason is Grant have a refractory base, firebird doesn't.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 2,008 scudo2


    DGOBS wrote: »
    Reason is Grant have a refractory base, firebird doesn't.

    Dampness and dirt also ants nest build up under them if outdoor causing severe rusting attracting moisture from non damp proofed floor.
    No problem if fitted on bricks allowing for ventulation of base.


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