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The Hamster Clinic (or the Repair Advice Thread)

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  • Registered Users Posts: 59 ✭✭blockman


    Sounds like the diaphragm has failed.
    PM me if you are interested in repair and I can give you details.


    Details have been sent by PM


  • Registered Users Posts: 102 ✭✭scoobydoo07


    Hi there
    I recently purchased a canon 50d camera at a good price secondhand. I noticed that when you take a picture and review it on the LCD display,the very bright sections of the picture flash black momentarily .
    When you press the zoom feature in one click the problem disappears. It isn't a major issue but just distracting .
    My question is can this be fixed easily enough ??
    Thanks for your advice


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,792 ✭✭✭zerohamster


    Hi there
    I recently purchased a canon 50d camera at a good price secondhand. I noticed that when you take a picture and review it on the LCD display,the very bright sections of the picture flash black momentarily .
    When you press the zoom feature in one click the problem disappears. It isn't a major issue but just distracting .
    My question is can this be fixed easily enough ??
    Thanks for your advice

    Hi,

    I don't believe that is actually a fault. It sounds like you have 'highlight alert' switched on (I believe that is the name). This feature highlights any part of the photo that is blown out and is quite useful as you want to keep that to a minimum.

    The option should be accessible in the menu (the 2nd blue menu when the camera mode dial is set to manual, AV or TV).

    I hope this helps and enjoy the new camera!


  • Registered Users Posts: 102 ✭✭scoobydoo07


    Fair play to you !!
    Thanks very much maybe I should have bought a colouring book !!


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,792 ✭✭✭zerohamster


    Fair play to you !!
    Thanks very much maybe I should have bought a colouring book !!

    No problem haha :) there are lots of tiny settings that when activated unintentionally can appear to hinder usage, the most common is accidentally switching AF modes from 'one shot' to 'AI servo' which let's the camera decides whether to track a subject with continuous AF (moving subjects) or single focus which can sometimes appear as if the AF is misbehaving.

    Best of luck!


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  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators Posts: 19,430 Mod ✭✭✭✭Sam Russell


    I have a Nikon F2 film camera that has TTL metering. It shows + for over and - for under exposure. However, it only shows - (under exposure) no matter how much light is there. Either the detector is dead, or is covered. How can I access it to test it?

    The camera is more of a museum piece but is working otherwise and I would like it to work fully.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,792 ✭✭✭zerohamster


    I have a Nikon F2 film camera that has TTL metering. It shows + for over and - for under exposure. However, it only shows - (under exposure) no matter how much light is there. Either the detector is dead, or is covered. How can I access it to test it?

    The camera is more of a museum piece but is working otherwise and I would like it to work fully.


    The meter might just have lost sensitivity with age but there are certainly a few things to try first.

    a couple of things to try first though...

    The meter will only work with the wind lever in the stand-off position. Set a speed of 1/60 and an aperture of f1.4 and move the camera past a light source - see if the meter moves.
    There's a battery check button on the front of the F2 finder - pushing it with the wind lever out should center the needle in the +/- display - both in the finder and on top of the finder as well (which is great for setting up a street shot exposure without having to look through the camera)
    The finder is designed to be interchangeable - the silver button which you need to use your nail to depress on the back of the camera and the lever on the front right of the finder (looking from behind the camera) both need to be pressed / turned at the same time and the finder will just lift off (the lever at the front needs to be pushed in before you can turn it)
    Give the contacts which pass power up from the camera into the finder a gentle clean.
    With the finder off, turn the film speed / shutter speed dial a few times to clean up the track as much as possible.

    I hope this helps.


  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators Posts: 19,430 Mod ✭✭✭✭Sam Russell


    Thanks for that.

    The display is just 3 LEDs, one next to +, and one next to - and one in the middle.

    The - is continuously lit whatever light enters the lens.

    I put new batteries in it, and one LED lights, so that is far as I have got.

    Any idea where the sensor is placed in the camera? It could be just crud covering it.


  • Registered Users Posts: 690 ✭✭✭westdub


    I have a Nikon D7000 with a scratched sensor filter, is it a big job to replace?


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,792 ✭✭✭zerohamster


    Thanks for that.

    The display is just 3 LEDs, one next to +, and one next to - and one in the middle.

    The - is continuously lit whatever light enters the lens.

    I put new batteries in it, and one LED lights, so that is far as I have got.

    Any idea where the sensor is placed in the camera? It could be just crud covering it.

    I am not familiar with the model much but I believe it is in the viewfinder. You could try cleaning the surface of the cell but most likely you would need to replace it.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,792 ✭✭✭zerohamster


    westdub wrote: »
    I have a Nikon D7000 with a scratched sensor filter, is it a big job to replace?

    Unfortunately it can be quite expensive due to the filter price being around €100-150 depending on the source but I am not sure what Nikon charge in total for the repair. You would need to go to them to get a quote for repair.


  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators Posts: 19,430 Mod ✭✭✭✭Sam Russell


    I am not familiar with the model much but I believe it is in the viewfinder. You could try cleaning the surface of the cell but most likely you would need to replace it.

    Thanks for the reply. The camera is very old and the parts may be hard to find so I might just leave it as is because it is still usable - just no TTL metering.


  • Registered Users Posts: 143 ✭✭Thedarkb


    I have a cosina CT1-a SLR body with a slightly tilted mirror, it has a wicked tendency to mess up my horizons. Any idea on how I can fix this?


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,953 ✭✭✭homerhop


    Make:Cannon

    Item: Bridge Camera

    Model: Powershot SX1IS

    Fault: will not switch on

    When/how it happened: Don't know, other half had it, gave it back saying it wouldn't switch on.


  • Registered Users Posts: 6 Kevbhoyo


    Make: Canon

    Item: Lens


    Model: 16-35mm f2.8L

    Fault: Mount of lens broke off

    When/how it happened: Camera tipped over while on tripod, breaking lens


  • Registered Users Posts: 28 shedd7


    Make: Canon

    Item: Lens


    Model: 50mm 1.4

    Fault: Not focusing in either AF or Manual

    When/ how it happened Don't know, used to work fine but hadn't been used for a few months.


  • Registered Users Posts: 143 ✭✭Thedarkb


    Make: Petri

    Item: Lens

    Model: 35-70mm f/3.5

    Fault: Zoom ring stiff and sticky, can't go wider than 40mm without it sticking


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,792 ✭✭✭zerohamster


    Thedarkb wrote: »
    I have a cosina CT1-a SLR body with a slightly tilted mirror, it has a wicked tendency to mess up my horizons. Any idea on how I can fix this?

    To be honest I am not familiar with this model so I can't really advise much.
    Is the mirror bent or loose?


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,792 ✭✭✭zerohamster


    homerhop wrote: »
    Make:Cannon

    Item: Bridge Camera

    Model: Powershot SX1IS

    Fault: will not switch on

    When/how it happened: Don't know, other half had it, gave it back saying it wouldn't switch on.

    I'm not sure what could be wrong as there are many causes for a camera to not turn on but primarily make sure the battery is charged and also working. I have had people bring me cameras that have been dead due to the battery failing (not to say that is always or even usually the case however).
    Without more details there isn't much I can speculate on. Was it dropped, got wet, didn't turn on one day or suddenly turn off whilst being used?


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,792 ✭✭✭zerohamster


    Kevbhoyo wrote: »
    Make: Canon

    Item: Lens


    Model: 16-35mm f2.8L

    Fault: Mount of lens broke off

    When/how it happened: Camera tipped over while on tripod, breaking lens

    Hi Kev,

    PM me with your details and I will get back to you.

    Did just the mount rip off or did the PCB come with it and rip the cables etc...


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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,792 ✭✭✭zerohamster


    shedd7 wrote: »
    Make: Canon

    Item: Lens


    Model: 50mm 1.4

    Fault: Not focusing in either AF or Manual

    When/ how it happened Don't know, used to work fine but hadn't been used for a few months.

    This is quite a common fault on this lens and is caused by a barrel bending at a weak point.

    PM me if you are interested in getting it repaired.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,792 ✭✭✭zerohamster


    Thedarkb wrote: »
    Make: Petri

    Item: Lens

    Model: 35-70mm f/3.5

    Fault: Zoom ring stiff and sticky, can't go wider than 40mm without it sticking
    This is probably caused by a deterioration of the lubricant and it drying out to jam the lens and make it stiff.

    I don't think the lens is economic to repair as you can get them on ebay in working condition for about €25 shipped.

    http://www.ebay.ie/itm/Camera-lens-for-PENTAX-SLR-35-70mm-f-1-3-5-4-5-PROMURA-PETRI-CHINON-RICOH-K38-/360891155661


  • Registered Users Posts: 143 ✭✭Thedarkb


    To be honest I am not familiar with this model so I can't really advise much.
    Is the mirror bent or loose?

    No it's just tilted slightly, you may also know this camera as the Nikon FM10, vivitar V3800n and the voigtlander bessaflex(all the same camera with different skin)


  • Registered Users Posts: 143 ✭✭Thedarkb


    This is probably caused by a deterioration of the lubricant and it drying out to jam the lens and make it stiff.

    I don't think the lens is economic to repair as you can get them on ebay in working condition for about €25 shipped.

    http://www.ebay.ie/itm/Camera-lens-for-PENTAX-SLR-35-70mm-f-1-3-5-4-5-PROMURA-PETRI-CHINON-RICOH-K38-/360891155661
    I'm wondering how to dismantle it and clean it


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,792 ✭✭✭zerohamster


    Thedarkb wrote: »
    No it's just tilted slightly, you may also know this camera as the Nikon FM10, vivitar V3800n and the voigtlander bessaflex(all the same camera with different skin)

    I don't really deal with film camera repairs myself so I'm not familiar with the internals of this model but if the mirror arm is metal and bent it could be possible to bend it back ever so slightly but you would have to be very carefull not to break the mirror.

    I am thinking it's either the mirror arm bent or the axle inside is twisted ever so slightly causing a raise on one side.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,792 ✭✭✭zerohamster


    Thedarkb wrote: »
    I'm wondering how to dismantle it and clean it

    I've never had one in for repair so I can't tell you the exact proceedure but from photos it looks like it takes down from the back as is normal with most lenses.
    The aperture ring will most likely have a spring arm or ball bearing so be carefull of that when taking it off.
    From the mount you will likely be also taking the aperture level and mechanism out and rebuild the lens you may need a probe to move the aperture to a position that allows you to assemble with a working aperture ring.
    Take photos on the way down at every step as some parts may attach in multiple different rotations but only one will allow correct operation.

    The zoom could operate in many different ways so I can't help you there but look for loose parts or obstructions when disassembling.
    If the Lubricant is dry and gummy, clean (isopropyl alcohol helps) and relube with a synthetic grease (just a small warning but don't put WD40 anywhere near a lens, just in case it isn't obvious).

    The correct tools are very important, make sure you have flathead screwdrivers of different sizes (or philips if that's what it takes) and also you may need a lens spanner which will cost more than the lens if you don't have it or a similar tool already.

    Nothing should require force to take off, if it isn't moving, check around for something that still needs to be removed before proceeding to the next "level" of the disassembly.

    Lastly, patience and a steady hand helps.


  • Registered Users Posts: 143 ✭✭Thedarkb


    I've never had one in for repair so I can't tell you the exact proceedure but from photos it looks like it takes down from the back as is normal with most lenses.
    The aperture ring will most likely have a spring arm or ball bearing so be carefull of that when taking it off.
    From the mount you will likely be also taking the aperture level and mechanism out and rebuild the lens you may need a probe to move the aperture to a position that allows you to assemble with a working aperture ring.
    Take photos on the way down at every step as some parts may attach in multiple different rotations but only one will allow correct operation.

    The zoom could operate in many different ways so I can't help you there but look for loose parts or obstructions when disassembling.
    If the Lubricant is dry and gummy, clean (isopropyl alcohol helps) and relube with a synthetic grease (just a small warning but don't put WD40 anywhere near a lens, just in case it isn't obvious).

    The correct tools are very important, make sure you have flathead screwdrivers of different sizes (or philips if that's what it takes) and also you may need a lens spanner which will cost more than the lens if you don't have it or a similar tool already.

    Nothing should require force to take off, if it isn't moving, check around for something that still needs to be removed before proceeding to the next "level" of the disassembly.

    Lastly, patience and a steady hand helps.

    I've made the WD40 mistake before, but only as a last resort on my only k mount prime. I'm a bit uncomfortable as i've never disassembled a zoom before.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,792 ✭✭✭zerohamster


    Thedarkb wrote: »
    I've made the WD40 mistake before, but only as a last resort on my only k mount prime. I'm a bit uncomfortable as i've never disassembled a zoom before.
    I've seen a few people do it out of frustration/last resort so I thought it may be worth a mention, definitely a mistake only made oncem that's for sure.

    Older zooms tend to be less finicky than modern zooms as there is no AF mechanisms or electronics to worry about which takes the difficulty down a notch.
    Be cautious and take your time. Worst comes to worst you can get a replacement for about €25 and will have learnt a lot. Photos will help as well as seperating screws and writing where they came from as it is a lot easier to disassemble than to reassemble and have a lens work. That's where the patience comes in. If you get stuck and don't see any way to go farther other than to pry, just stop and reassemble as nothing good ever comes from that.

    Let me know how you get on and best of luck!


  • Registered Users Posts: 1 itheemperor


    Item: Lens


    Model: sigma 50mm f1.4 EX DG

    Fault: very bad focus issue, tried in camera AF micro adjustment, slight improvement at +20 which is the max limit, using canon 5d mark iii, no other lens have this problem,

    When/how it happened:

    bought this lens from a online seller and he is refusing to take any responsiblity,


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  • Registered Users Posts: 18 Fleagle


    Make: Canon 400D

    Item: Canon EFS 17-85mm

    Fault: Getting the following error message - "Err99 Shooting is not possible. Turn the power switch to <OFF> and <ON> again or re-install the battery"

    It only happens in daylight - it works as usual indoors. I have tried another lens and that works fine.

    When/how it happened: It just happened - there was no fall or damage to the camera/lens.


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