Advertisement
How to add spoiler tags, edit posts, add images etc. How to - a user's guide to the new version of Boards
Mods please check the Moderators Group for an important update on Mod tools. If you do not have access to the group, please PM Niamh. Thanks!

A restoration tale (with pics)

1235728

Comments



  • Fibreglassing sounds very complicated with different compounds, meshes strands, woven etc. but really, just try it and you'll see that it is very easy to use and gives a very solid finish no matter how badly you think its applied.
    I was fibreglassing kayaks together in secondry school and the hardest part is the sanding down afterwards (but you seem to have the sanding thing sorted;))

    Like painting, the prep work is the key, just tidy up the "wound" clean off the dust and lash it on, mesh first and dab the mixed resin into it until its coated. leave it to cure and then sand down and repeat.

    My advice would be to get the hull sorted, fit the engine and controls and take her onto the water, leave the soft furnishings and finishes until you have experienced the satisfaction of piloting your own boat and it will give you another boost and a view of the finish line. As always if you need a hand with anything give me a call

    (you are definately way more experienced at this thing than me at this stage and your workmanship is much better but I can still hold a spannerhammer:D)




  • If I do take on repairs, is it ok to grind grp? I have a grinder and am wondering what type of disc to use? Reason I ask is that grinder runs at one speed only and I am wondering if it is too fast for grp.




  • Work away with the angle grinder a stone disc should be fine and wear eye goggles gloves and a good mask as the fibers can get everywhere and make you feel like you are covered in itching power.:eek:




  • fergal.b wrote: »
    the fibers can get everywhere and make you feel like you are covered in itching power.:eek:

    Im well used to that by now, not to mention being covered in tar, tar balls in the hair and speckle burns all over my face from stripper. Bing it on. As I say - health and safety, how are you!




  • DMNE..... I salut you sir!!!

    I have just read your entire thread and have enjoyed it immensely. I'm a bit of a boat nut myself. I'm currently sitting on one in Spain. I'm a Chief Officer on a 170ft yacht.

    On my leave I have been known to buy small boats similar to your boat and try to do it up. Always takes longer and costs more than I expect, even after the third time.

    I understand your frustration but you should remember a couple of things.

    1) Allot of the money you have spent has gone on good quality power tools and equipment which you will always have, so no loss there really.

    2) You're gaining experience all the time which will always stand you in good steed.


    I know exactly how you feel right now and it is not nice. Has this all been a big mistake? Where has all the money gone? etc...

    I have every faith that you will complete this project but even if you don't you know you will have given it your best.


    Down the line if you find a few more euro in the bank account and you feel like upgrading to a new boat you will know exactly what to look out for...and having that knowledge can be priceless.....

    I wish you the very best of luck Sir, your determination is an inspiration to us all!!!

    JF


  • Advertisement


  • fergal.b wrote: »
    Work away with the angle grinder a stone disc should be fine and wear eye goggles gloves and a good mask as the fibers can get everywhere and make you feel like you are covered in itching power.:eek:

    Dont you mean a metal disk, the stone disks (I assume you mean the ones for cutting into stone/masonary) are smooth with just a few teeth. I wont be doing any cutting, just grinding back and creating a feathered taper for repairs so will be using the flat of the disk.




  • One of these, nice post johnny f

    _23048__159904__.jpg




  • fergal.b wrote: »
    One of these, nice post johnny f

    _23048__159904__.jpg

    Can you describe this, I cant read label




  • My question was really about grp and grinders wrt to speed and melting. Now that you say it's ok to use a grider, I think I can stick to my existing metal disks for both cutting and feathering.


  • Advertisement


  • dnme wrote: »
    My question was really about grp and grinders wrt to speed and melting. Now that you say it's ok to use a grider, I think I can stick to my existing metal disks for both cutting and feathering.

    Keep it moving and you should be fine :D I can't wait to see what your next photo will be like when you cut away all the crap :eek: Good luck.




  • fergal.b wrote: »
    Keep it moving and you should be fine :D I can't wait to see what your next photo will be like when you cut away all the crap :eek: Good luck.

    Weather bad here atm. I may not get at the boat for a while. My next job is to strip the port underside. God knows what that'll uncover. If it's raining tomorrow, I'll post a pic of all the glass / resin kit that has arrived in the past few days and document it.




  • Slig wrote: »
    Fibreglassing sounds very complicated with different compounds, meshes strands, woven etc. but really, just try it and you'll see that it is very easy to use and gives a very solid finish no matter how badly you think its applied.
    I was fibreglassing kayaks together in secondry school and the hardest part is the sanding down afterwards (but you seem to have the sanding thing sorted;))

    Like painting, the prep work is the key, just tidy up the "wound" clean off the dust and lash it on, mesh first and dab the mixed resin into it until its coated. leave it to cure and then sand down and repeat.

    My advice would be to get the hull sorted, fit the engine and controls and take her onto the water, leave the soft furnishings and finishes until you have experienced the satisfaction of piloting your own boat and it will give you another boost and a view of the finish line. As always if you need a hand with anything give me a call

    (you are definately way more experienced at this thing than me at this stage and your workmanship is much better but I can still hold a spannerhammer:D)

    Call up some evening, open invitation. I'd appreciate your appraisal of this wreck.




  • Day 18

    Despite the wind and rain, I went out to the boat today, got myself in under the tarp and finished off stripping and sanding the hull port underside. I'll say it again, job from hell, job from hell!!! Lying on your back on gravel and grass, working closely above your head with paint stripper and then sanders. You get covered in crap and no matter what kind of eye protection, you still get it in the eyes. I made myself a pillow out of old blankets rolled up and squeezed into plastic. This really helps. You no longer strain the neck muscles and thus use less energy. I notice a level of fitness kicking as I was able to move along under the hull and keep the sander held aloft for much longer periods then I was a few days ago. Sore shoulders at night though.

    The good news is that there are no patches or repairs on the port hull underside. The side keel is delaminating at the leading edge but I knew that. So all the damage was to one side only. Makes you wonder, I wander was this boat badly moored near rocks or something and abandoned there to wreck. All the repair damage on one side???

    Anyheeew, the boat is stripped. The dam boat is stripped. I'd never have believed it. And when I say stripped, I mean stripped properly, the exterior is now completely right back to the original gelcoat. That took some doing.

    I'm gonna wait for warmer and calmer weather before I start any repairs. I want to plan jobs, have my cloth cut and ready for each Epoxy batch but it needs warm temps to cure. Out of technical interest for those following, here is a pic of the grp repair kit that arrived in the recent past. I ordered the Epoxy resin from Fyne Boats across the water but have since discovered MBFG in N.Ireland. I will deal with them in future cos they have a great range of stock but they also deliver this type of kit down to the republic whereas getting it from UK is a major hoohah. Most of the suppliers now either refuse to ship any 2part Expoy solution or charge a fortune as it's considered hazardous. The Hempel, cloth, filler etc arrived from MBFG yesterday.

    157833.jpg

    1. Acetone, just for cleaning grp feathering.
    2. Freefix 2 part bonding paste
    3. Hempel Epoxy filler
    4. 280gsm woven roving 6x1m
    5. 600gsm woven roving 6x1m
    (I went for this mix of cloth as csm is not good with epoxy. Now that I have received the cloth, the 600gsm seems very heavy)
    6. Silica Epoxy mixer (came with Epoxy kit)
    7. Wood flour blend Epoxy mixer (came with Epoxy kit)
    8. 6Kg Epoxy kit. Catalyst is in white container.
    9. Mixing pumps for Epoxy kit, helps get the mixing ratio correct
    10. Chopped strands 6mm. These can be mixed into Epoxy to form a good strong paste.
    11. Various sundries. Rollers, mixing trays, hardeners, gloves, disposable brushes, mixing sticks etc

    Also won 2x300ml Sikaflex on Ebay last night. €15 delivered. Not too bad, I'm told the stuff is amazing for bonding wood to grp




  • you are doing an excellent job there dnme,you are showing us all up even fergal :D and a great thread with a brilliant read all round,by the time you have finished your experience of doing a fibre glass boat will be vastly greater,now that you have the tools,build a shed and start a small little business for yourself

    can't wait to see the finished product,all eyes are on ya from the boards good luck and thanks for sharing




  • Interesting to see pics of the stripped article.

    You should post up one before and one after, just to show how far you've come.




  • hi dnme,
    i have just read this from start to finish and your doing a brill job on this.
    don't lose faith,
    Gar




  • Thanks for all the comments. At the moment - rain halts play but I'm hoping to make a new post on trailer restoration in the coming week or so.




  • Hello dnme,

    Have just spent the last 40 mins looking through this thread and have throughly enjoyed it, not that i have much of an interest in boats really. But your persistance and determination is to be admired. Keep the chin up and don't lose faith. She will be a cracker tipping down the lough on a warm sunny day. Best of luck.




  • Day 19

    Since May 1st, it has rained non stop in the North West. When I say it has rained non stop, I mean non stop. I think we had a 20 minute period on May 7th where it abated slightly but apart from that, I have started putting two of every animal I can find into the dam boat. I literally have not been able to go near the boat, I spend quite a lot of time trying to keep the tarp pinned down as it's not only raining a lot here, it's also almost constantly windy and some days it's just plain blowing a storm.

    If I can't get at the boat, then I need a fix so let's have a go at the trailer. I took the trailer asunder in the past week and stripped off as many parts as I could. There were three roller brackets on the main beam that were beyond repair so I lobbed them off with the angle grinder. The trailer itself is plain steel or cast iron so it's fairly rusty. The wheels are pure rust buckets as is the hitch which has seized.

    I decided to give an old trick I used to do a try. Rust removal by electrolysis. This is a really simple and very effective way to get rid of rust and it's great fun for anyone into science and chemistry. (remember this from school?). Basically we use a baking soda solution, an anode, an electrical charge and the workpiece to be de-rusted.

    Make up a container of water, add a little baking soda (or washing soda), perhaps a teaspoonful for every litre of water. Get yourself a sacrificial anode, in this case, a lump or two of iron or straight steel, any ferrous metal should do. These are connected to the positive side of the electrical source and placed in the solution. The workpiece is connected to the negative side of the electrical source and also placed in the solution. Make sure you get this polarity right! The piece and anodes are now fully submersed in the solution but make sure they do not touch.

    Fire up the electrical charge. If all is well, you should immediately see tiny bubbles coming form the piece under the water. If you see nothing, check your connections. Connecting to old rusty lumps of iron can be tricky. get a wire brush or angle grinder and clean the metal back, then retry the connection. For my power source, I used my battery charger. It can operate at either 12 or 24 volts and has a boost switch that pumps out 20 amps. So I set it to 24v @ 20 amps and for each piece, I left it run for 24 hours. As the electrolysis takes place, your anodes rust down and the tiny bubbles combine to produce a rusty sludge on the water surface. This is good, it means that the process is working. By the way, those bubbles are pure hydrogen so do this in a well ventilated place and do not smoke or do anything that might cause a flame. A hydrogen build up will blow you away!!

    Another thing worth mentioning is that 24volts @ 20 amps is the kind of current you will feel. Put your hand in the water, grab an anode and see what happens. Bit more than a tingle. So beware, operate with rubber gloves and remember that connecting and disconnecting your positive lead to your anodes often produces sparks (remember that hydrogen) so you can see the need for ventilation. I did my electrolysis outside the window with the battery charger inside.

    Electrolysis works strongest in line of sight mode so having a few anodes connected up together and surrounding the work piece is ideal, or else you can turn the piece every so often so that a new side faces the anode. The results are amazing. Electrolysis works only on the rust, paint and any layers above good metal. When it gets to bare metal it stops. You will see some of the results I achieved in the pictures below.

    In the meantime, seeing as I am working on the trailer, I am going to need a towbar. After a few weeks of looking and searching, a call to North West autoparts last week finally yielded results. Guy there had one. I was delighted upon calling to see it came with the electrial assembly and all fitting nuts and bolts. Haggled him down to €50. Needs a bit of a cleanup and painting.

    I was also delighted to be able to restore the trailer ball hitch. My local hire shop was able to supply me with a new safety release spring so I now have it stripped, and primed. It will be as good as new. Unfortunately I was not so lucky with the jockey wheel. It is ceased beyond repair. Even my local mechanic could not budge it. Looks like I'll have to fork out for a new one. Can't win em all.

    The trailer frame itself is being stripped and will soon be ready for painting. I am using Hammerite rust primer on all parts followed by a Hammerite "straight to rust" overcoat. I dont know if it'll be any good, the overcoat is not going onto the primer too well. Perhaps I didn't need a primer at all but I'm old school, I could not bring myself to paint metal without rust primer.

    1. Towbar bought for €50. Came with all fittings, nuts and bolts and the electrial assembly. Great bargain. Sometimes I love being poor.
    159214.jpg

    2. Electrolysis bath. Here I am using two anodes opposite each other. They are connected with a bit of spare cable terminated with croc clips. The workpiece is placed between these so that we get full electrolysis from two sides at once. You can see the before and after, where the process creates a rust coloured sludge.
    159215.jpg

    3. Rusty wheel before and after.
    159219.jpg

    4. Trailer ball hitch before and after. Amazing result. I also installed a new safety release spring so the unit is now as good as new. The after pic was literally 5 minutes with a wire brush, the paint and gunk just fell off it.
    159221.jpg

    5. This is my battery charger. The ideal chargers are the simple types with good high amp options.
    159223.jpg


  • Advertisement


  • Hi DNME
    I HAVE BEEN FOLLOWING THIS THREAD FROM DAY 2 AND REALLY ENJOYED GOING ALONG WITH IT. THEIR IS DAYS WHEN I FEEL LIKE JUMPING INTO THE CAR AND DRIVING DOWN TO YOU AND GIVE YOU A HAND BECAUSE YOU HAVE PUT EVERY EMOTION INTO IT I FEEL LIKE IT'S MY PROJECT. AN INSPIRATION TO ANYONE OUT THEIR FEELING THEY CAN'T DO IT. AS I AM THE IRISH BUSINESS PARTNER IN EU45 ANTIFOUL PAINT I AM IN A POSITION TO SEND YOU A FREE CAN IN ANY COULOR YOU WANT TO PAINT YOUR BOAT WITH, I WILL GET IT DELIVERED TO YOUR DOOR. YOU CAN HAVE BLACK,DARK BLUE,MID BLUE,RED,OR LIGHT GREY. I KNOW IT'S A BIT EARLY BUT IT'S ANOTHER THING OFF YOUR LIST MY EMAIL IS mod deleted YOU CAN SEND ME YOUR DETAILS.CHIN UP BATTLE ON LOOKING FORWARD TO HER DAYS IN THE WATER AGAIN.




  • Hi Boating and welcome to the forum.

    Just a bit of friendly advice as you are probably not aware of it but typing all in upper-case is considered to be the text version of shouting.

    Also, I'm going to delete you email address otherwise you'll be inundated with spam. Just send a PM (private message) if you want to pass on your personal details to anyone.

    Regards,
    Tabnabs

    (Moderator hat off again)




  • boating, Thank you for the offer of a tin of paint but I wont be using antifouling on the boat. I'll either just paint the entire boat in the same system or put a coat of bitumen on the underside.

    In the meantime, the boat remains under the tarp. It has been this way since May 1st. The weather forecast today (Sunday May 22nd) is for a storm tonight/tomorrow. I'm a bit worried by that. I hope the boat and tarp stay put.

    159955.jpg




  • Tabnabs wrote: »
    Hi Boating and welcome to the forum.

    Just a bit of friendly advice as you are probably not aware of it but typing all in upper-case is considered to be the text version of shouting.

    Also, I'm going to delete you email address otherwise you'll be inundated with spam. Just send a PM (private message) if you want to pass on your personal details to anyone.

    Regards,
    Tabnabs

    (Moderator hat off again)

    Thank you Tabnabs
    For the advice only new to boards still trying to get use to it , will have to get to grips with pm and all the others things . But once again thank you .




  • dnme wrote: »
    boating, Thank you for the offer of a tin of paint but I wont be using antifouling on the boat. I'll either just paint the entire boat in the same system or put a coat of bitumen on the underside.

    In the meantime, the boat remains under the tarp. It has been this way since May 1st. The weather forecast today (Sunday May 22nd) is for a storm tonight/tomorrow. I'm a bit worried by that. I hope the boat and tarp stay put.

    159955.jpg

    That's no problem but the offer stands if you change your mind and again your doing a great Job




  • dnme wrote: »
    boating, Thank you for the offer of a tin of paint but I wont be using antifouling on the boat. I'll either just paint the entire boat in the same system or put a coat of bitumen on the underside.

    In the meantime, the boat remains under the tarp. It has been this way since May 1st. The weather forecast today (Sunday May 22nd) is for a storm tonight/tomorrow. I'm a bit worried by that. I hope the boat and tarp stay put.

    159955.jpg

    That's no problem but the offer stands if you change your mind and again your doing a great Job




  • Day 20. Storms hit the Northwest.

    .................A lucky escape

    160162.jpg




  • exelent job dnme, just reading here has giving me some more info for my budget restoration (fireball dinghy), im going to start a thread here soon. if your going to lop off one of the sets of wheels id love to take the lopped ones off your hands :o cant get me a tailer anywhere




  • tbnewman wrote: »
    exelent job dnme, just reading here has giving me some more info for my budget restoration (fireball dinghy), im going to start a thread here soon. if your going to lop off one of the sets of wheels id love to take the lopped ones off your hands :o cant get me a tailer anywhere

    Well, I may or may not.

    On that very note; yesterday I went to Sligo to get two new tyres for two of my newly painted trailer rims. Seems they are 10" rims and 10" tyres are pricey. Cheapest I could source were €65 a wheel. So in the words of my great grandmother..."for fu_ck sakes!!!!!!!!!"
    Nothing about this restoration is without problems or issues. I will scrap the 10" rims and have already bought these http://www.adverts.ie/414626

    At this stage now, I just want to set fire to the f'n thing. Between the weather, storms, trees falling and barely missing it, and the spiraling cost, I've come to hate the sight of the dam thing.


  • Advertisement


  • Great work so far dnme, I'm very interested in how you were forming the windows. Iv seen people use vacuum bags when laminating timber, do you think the same thing would work for your windows?


Advertisement