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byob....

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  • 17-10-2009 12:23am
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 3,845 ✭✭✭


    Do you think you would eat out more often if you were allowed to bring your own choice of wine,
    nothing else not beer,spirits,minerals or water just the vino
    I know I would even if it was only once a month extra with friends,

    if this is in the wrong place please move.....thanks

    byob........Would this mean you might eat out more often? 27 votes

    yes,but only if corkage was free
    0%
    yes,only if corkage was minimal €2-€3
    40%
    deRangedBlistermanJIZZLORDchillywillyciaran76Johneeslayerkingseamy_orrPeadar06Heroditassoundsham 11 votes
    no wouldn't change a thing
    37%
    rubaduboconnguildofevilJev/NMr Benevolentbennyobthe beer revoluMichellenmanibarelycaredrkpower 10 votes
    wouldn't affect me I don't drink
    22%
    MimikyuThomas_S_HuntersonnobyBeerNutmoonflowerAbi 6 votes
    Tagged:


«1

Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 2,114 ✭✭✭noby


    wouldn't affect me I don't drink
    The fact that I may or may not be able to bring my own bottle isn't the overriding factor in not eating out as much as I used to.


  • Registered Users Posts: 16,839 ✭✭✭✭the beer revolu


    no wouldn't change a thing
    I think it would help.

    Wine (even poor wine) can really turn an otherwise good value bite out into a quite expensive affair.

    Example: Ate in Gruel in Dublin a few weeks ago. Loved the atmosphere and style of the place - the food was a bit hit and miss but reasonable value, but by the time we had a couple of thimbles of cheap Italian Merlot, it ended up costing over €50 for 2 - without starters or desserts !
    Not cheap anymore!

    I guess byob would encourage me to nip out for a feed in a restaurant more often but it probably wouldn't change how often I'd 'go out for dinner', if you get my meaning.


  • Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators Posts: 11,818 Mod ✭✭✭✭BeerNut


    wouldn't affect me I don't drink
    If it was just wine it wouldn't change anything for me, since most restaurants already sell drinkable wine. BYO beer would make a big difference though, since restaurants are mostly unwilling to stock anything beyond the beer equivalents of Black Tower and Blue Nun.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,020 ✭✭✭Brian CivilEng


    I agree with BeerNut, most restaurants seem to have a huge wine list and a few bottles of generic beer. I try to limit how much I drink so I hate wasting my quota on wine or Guinness/Heineken when I eat out. If I could bring my own bottles if beer to a restaurant it would be better.


  • Registered Users Posts: 18,911 ✭✭✭✭Mimikyu


    wouldn't affect me I don't drink
    This post has been deleted.


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 78 ✭✭Johnee


    yes,only if corkage was minimal €2-€3
    This seems to be a big trend in Montreal when I was there and it works fantastically well. Sure, restaurants tend to have ok wine lists these days but they still have a big mark-up on the wine. Bringing your own means you can either save a lot of cash by bringing a bottle of similar standard, or decide to spend the same amount and bring a much much better bottle. Either way, its a winner and I would love to see restaurants in Ireland doing this.


  • Registered Users Posts: 16,839 ✭✭✭✭the beer revolu


    no wouldn't change a thing
    I wonder are the licensing laws different for byo.
    Anyone know?


  • Registered Users Posts: 32,379 ✭✭✭✭rubadub


    no wouldn't change a thing
    soundsham wrote: »
    nothing else not beer,spirits,minerals or water just the vino
    Why just wine? :confused:
    I guess byob would encourage me to nip out for a feed in a restaurant more often but it probably wouldn't change how often I'd 'go out for dinner', if you get my meaning.
    As in just nip in and then head out? In my local pub they used to have a joint chinese restaurant. We would never be drinking wine or going to restaurants but in this case they had a good deal with wine thrown in and it was about as cheap as getting a takeaway in with beer/wine before the pub. If it was beer rather than wine I would have taken them up on it. I see a few places doing a "stew & pint" oiffer in pubs.

    My sister goes to some BYOB place and can bring vodka & coke. A bottle of vodka has ~20 shots in it, equivalent to about 12 pints. She would split the bottle with a mate and a 2L of coke. Now in my local 2L of coke is €28, and a bottle of vodka would be €78, that is €53 each. A 2L of coke and bottle is split €11 each. So in this way they see it as actually saving money, by heading to the restaurant they have €42 to spend on food that otherwise would have gone into a publicans pocket. It is some veggie place in bray I think and they do let people stay pretty much all night, like you would have seats in a pub all night. They just keep ordering more and more. They keep the coke etc chilled and give glasses & ice etc.

    I know 2 guys who had a joint 30th party in a restaurant and it was only their entire party taking over the place. Again they saved money compared to going to a boozer, or having to rent a place and get crappy bar food.


    BeerNut wrote: »
    BYO beer would make a big difference though, since restaurants are mostly unwilling to stock anything beyond the beer equivalents of Black Tower and Blue Nun.
    Same goes for spirits, though many are not overly particular about spirits, I would like decent mixers though, which I never see.
    I wonder are the licensing laws different for byo.
    I would like to know too, I am shocked it has not been exploited yet. I remember you used to get food in some niteclubs since they were legally obliged to sell give it due to their particular licence. A place could easily be set up to cater very well for BYOB under the guise of a restaurant. e.g. I would gladly pay €20 into a place if I could bring all my beer in and have it stored in fridges with proper security and barmen serving it to me, and simply get a burger & chips come closing time. Many people are staying home drinking and getting a pizza/chinese delivered, it is seems and obvious market to go after.

    15 years ago it costed ~twice as much to drink in pubs, not it can be ~5 times as much.


  • Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators Posts: 11,818 Mod ✭✭✭✭BeerNut


    wouldn't affect me I don't drink
    AFAIK you do not need any kind of liquor licence for BYOB. However, restaurant licences are easy to get and there's a fortune to be made on drink mark-ups.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,114 ✭✭✭noby


    wouldn't affect me I don't drink
    rubadub wrote: »
    I would gladly pay €20 into a place if I could bring all my beer in and have it stored in fridges with proper security and barmen serving it to me, and simply get a burger & chips come closing time.


    The licence to sell beer in restaurants has a fair few restrictions: you cannot sit at a bar; you have to sit and order a meal, and it basically can't be a liquid lunch.


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 7,134 ✭✭✭x in the city


    our flunked up country would surely introduce carbon tax on any BYO products ....:rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes:

    when Ireland has a BYO culture like Australia, I will gladly have a complete sexual gender change.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,304 ✭✭✭Lucena


    * Bump *

    Things are possibly changing in regards to bringing your own bottle. I was in a restaurant in the Midlands over Christmas, and you could bring in your own drink. As there were fourteen of us in it, we must've saved a small fortune. Also the fact that it was an Indian restaurant, where I feel beer suits the food better than wine, I was able to bring in a beer liked as opposed to whatever they had on tap, or in the fridge.

    It would definitely make me more inclined to go back regularly, if only I lived in Ireland all year round.


  • Registered Users Posts: 18,625 ✭✭✭✭BaZmO*


    Lucena wrote: »
    * Bump *

    Things are possibly changing in regards to bringing your own bottle. I was in a restaurant in the Midlands over Christmas, and you could bring in your own drink. As there were fourteen of us in it, we must've saved a small fortune. Also the fact that it was an Indian restaurant, where I feel beer suits the food better than wine, I was able to bring in a beer liked as opposed to whatever they had on tap, or in the fridge.

    It would definitely make me more inclined to go back regularly, if only I lived in Ireland all year round.

    Generally bumped threads aren't allowed but in this case I think it's ok as it's still relevant.

    I'm also interested in how the bring your own beer would work. Do they put it in the fridge for you?


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 18,300 ✭✭✭✭Seaneh


    So basically, because it interests you, it's ok?
    :rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes:




























    j/k :pac:


  • Registered Users Posts: 18,625 ✭✭✭✭BaZmO*


    Ha. You had me there for a sec! :D


  • Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators Posts: 11,818 Mod ✭✭✭✭BeerNut


    wouldn't affect me I don't drink
    BaZmO* wrote: »
    Do they put it in the fridge for you?
    Some do, some don't, in my experience. I'd say most places would if you asked them. The tricky bit is getting suitable glassware. I usually go with a wine glass.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 15,116 ✭✭✭✭RasTa


    Bar Indian, I don't think beer matches that well with food.


  • Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators Posts: 5,778 Mod ✭✭✭✭irish_goat


    RasTa wrote: »
    Bar Indian, I don't think beer matches that well with food.

    That's a ridiculous statement. For starters, beer and cheese go great together. Witbier and fish dishes is one of my favourites combos and big meaty dishes go great with dark Belgians.

    Here's a chart to get you started.
    http://thebeercircle.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/Beer-Food-pairing.jpg


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 18,300 ✭✭✭✭Seaneh


    RasTa wrote: »
    Bar Indian, I don't think beer matches that well with food.

    That is an absurd statement.

    Considering the sheer amount of styles anf sub-styles of beer, you are far, far, far more likely to find a beer to match with food than a wine.


  • Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators Posts: 11,818 Mod ✭✭✭✭BeerNut


    wouldn't affect me I don't drink
    Silly comments are silly.

    Excellent books are excellent.


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 15,116 ✭✭✭✭RasTa


    Food peasants! Fish and white wine is a combo made in heaven. Find me a beer that pairs better then wine for fish and I'll buy you a crate of said beer.

    I wouldn't have cheese as a starter and are you saying it goes better then wine?

    You're all getting way to defensive


  • Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators Posts: 5,778 Mod ✭✭✭✭irish_goat


    RasTa wrote: »
    Food peasants! Fish and white wine is a combo made in heaven. Find me a beer that pairs better then wine for fish and I'll buy you a crate of said beer.

    I wouldn't have cheese as a starter and are you saying it goes better then wine?

    You're all getting way to defensive

    Beers like Hoegaarden and nice hefeweizens like Weihenstephaner are great with fish, particularly dishes that have a creamy or citrusy aspect. They work better than a white wine would with a spicy fish dish as well.

    You can have cheese as a dessert or a snack though. I'd argue it does go better with cheese than wine, although each to their own of course.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 15,116 ✭✭✭✭RasTa


    Yeah probably a pointless debate as it's all down to individual taste.

    For me it's beer with spice, wine with everything else.


  • Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators Posts: 5,778 Mod ✭✭✭✭irish_goat


    RasTa wrote: »
    Yeah probably a pointless debate as it's all down to individual taste.

    For me it's beer with spice, wine with everything else.

    Try it with cheese, you'll not be disappointed. :)


  • Registered Users Posts: 18,625 ✭✭✭✭BaZmO*


    RasTa wrote: »
    Find me a beer that pairs better then wine for fish and I'll buy you a crate of said beer.

    This goes as well with fish as any wine imo. It's almost like it was made specifically for the job.

    RasTa wrote: »
    You're all getting way to defensive
    Happens a lot round these parts! :pac:


  • Registered Users Posts: 16,839 ✭✭✭✭the beer revolu


    no wouldn't change a thing
    RasTa wrote: »

    You're all getting way to defensive

    Disagreeing with you is being defensive?:confused:


  • Registered Users Posts: 16,839 ✭✭✭✭the beer revolu


    no wouldn't change a thing
    A good stout/ porter with a stew:p


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 15,116 ✭✭✭✭RasTa


    Disagreeing with you is being defensive?:confused:

    When you use terms such as silly, absurd and ridiculous then you're on the defensive imo.


  • Registered Users Posts: 327 ✭✭Tube


    This place is full of hyperbole!

    Lite lager goes great with pizza (I'm a beer fan, not a beer snob!) and also with Indian. Porter goes well with beef etc etc etc.

    But back on topic, I rarely drink wine with food, my beverage of choice (after 6pm) would usually be beer, so byob wine wouldn't influence me. My local Indian allows byo anything, which makes up a lot for the mediocre food!


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 2,592 ✭✭✭drumswan


    Beer covers the whole taste spectrum - sweet, bitter, sour, salty, umami and uses a much wider list of ingredients. Wine only uses one ingredient - grapes. On that basis alone beer is a better match for a wider variety of foods. Thats not to say that wine is not a better match for some foods though.


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