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Opera in Ireland - general discussion thread on all things opera in Ireland

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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 143 ✭✭JonnyBlackrock


    I notice that the Scottish Opera are doing La Boheme at the Grand Canal Theatre in June. Has anybody seen this production?

    http://www.grandcanaltheatre.ie/eventDetail.aspx?mid=188&eventId=75


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,066 ✭✭✭Sandwlch


    I notice that the Scottish Opera are doing La Boheme at the Grand Canal Theatre in June. Has anybody seen this production?

    http://www.grandcanaltheatre.ie/eventDetail.aspx?mid=188&eventId=75

    No, but thanks for he heads up. They are in belfast the week before. Interested in going to hear what the GCT sounds like and whether it has a future with opera.


  • Registered Users Posts: 7,872 ✭✭✭Dickerty


    Went to see Romeo et Juliette on Sat in the Gaiety, my first Opera - was pretty impressive! My wife got the tickets, she's not a fan but even she came away very taken by it.

    Anyone else there? Was I just easily impressed, or was this better than average?


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 143 ✭✭JonnyBlackrock


    Sandwlch wrote: »
    No, but thanks for he heads up. They are in belfast the week before. Interested in going to hear what the GCT sounds like and whether it has a future with opera.

    The original production got a total roasting in the (London) Independent:
    http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/theatre-dance/reviews/la-bohegraveme-theatre-royal-glasgow-562102.html
    but I know that this time the cast are totally different and the production has been revised.
    But I reckon I'll go anyway. It's not yet clear how much opera they're intending to put on at the GCT, and if not many people turn up for this Boheme then it will be the first and last opera there.
    This new revival opened in Scotland on Saturday night but no reviews seem to have appeared yet.
    Tickets are supposed to be on sale from this morning, but it doesn't look as if it is up and running yet, which will give us time to look for reviews.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 143 ✭✭JonnyBlackrock


    I've just bought tickets for the Saturday night performance.
    I've seen a few reviews in some British papers, and as expected they are mixed. They don't seem to think much of the production, but they all say that it's pretty good musically, which is the most important thing.
    But above all, as I said before, if it doesn't sell out there'll probably never be another opera at the new GCH so I think it's important that we show our faces there (or put our bums on the seats), and anyway, I want to have a look at the place as well and hear whether it's suitable for opera (hopefully it is - it can't be worse than the Gaiety....)


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  • Registered Users Posts: 4,282 ✭✭✭westtip


    Hi folks I have been off boards for a while - taking a break to get on with othe stuff good see the posts have been kept rolling in - will contribute a bit more later.

    Since I have taken my break from Boards.ie though there has of course been the OI season last week with two versions of Romeo and Juliet - Unfortunatley due to committments I was unable to attend either - Any news folks?

    The other big news was the unfortunate retirement of the Minister of Arts, Martin Cullen - I say unfortunate for the man himself and his bad back problems - he has my sympathy on that one - politically I will reserve my opinions. However my guess is with Mr. Cullen gone the new plans for a national opera company knocking together OI and OTC may be put on hold. Good thing Bad thing - who knows. My fear now is lack of vision and the seed of an idea to cobble the two companies together may end up in a dogs breakfast. Any thoughts folks?

    Perhaps in the forecast shakeup of various departments - and possible restructuring we are not even sure where "arts" will end up in terms of whose portfolio they will go to. Perhaps we should advocate Bertie for Minister for Da Arts (Errr......please don't take that comment seriously folks!).


    I see that the Grand Canal Theatre thinks we are still in the Celtic Tiger: Ticket prices for the Scottish Opera LaBoheme range from 45 Euro in the cheap seats up to 125 euro for the most expensive.

    Same opera same company same cast one week before in Belfast (a much smaller theatre) - cheapest tickets in the Gods 18.25 sterling (about 20 euro) most expensive in the dress circle or stalls 37.50 sterling (41 euro)- looks like I will be heading north, to hear the opera in a smaller more intimate theatre. Two people travelling from Dublin going for the best seats in the house - 82 euro for tickets, 25 euro for petrol and 10 for tolls = 117 euro taking the cheapest seats in Belfast and the trip up the motorway will cost two people about 70 euro 20 euro less than buying two of the cheapest seats in the Grand Canal.

    Two of the best priced tickets in Dublin Grand Canal = 250 Euro. Excluding any travel costs. Work it out for yourselves if four are travelling together.

    Hello are we are all stupid or something, nice though this theatre looks, at these prices for a regional touring opera company performance of La Boheme, the ticket prices are off the wall.


    I will take a look at what is going on sometime later on and give an update.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 143 ✭✭JonnyBlackrock


    westtip wrote: »






    I see that the Grand Canal Theatre thinks we are still in the Celtic Tiger: Ticket prices for the Scottish Opera LaBoheme range from 45 Euro in the cheap seats up to 125 euro for the most expensive.

    Same opera same company same cast one week before in Belfast (a much smaller theatre) - cheapest tickets in the Gods 18.25 sterling (about 20 euro) most expensive in the dress circle or stalls 37.50 sterling (41 euro)- looks like I will be heading north, to hear the opera in a smaller more intimate theatre. Two people travelling from Dublin going for the best seats in the house - 82 euro for tickets, 25 euro for petrol and 10 for tolls = 117 euro taking the cheapest seats in Belfast and the trip up the motorway will cost two people about 70 euro 20 euro less than buying two of the cheapest seats in the Grand Canal.



    Hello are we are all stupid or something, nice though this theatre looks, at these prices for a regional touring opera company performance of La Boheme, the ticket prices are off the wall.

    Hi Westtip!
    Excellent point about the prices, and I wouldn't usually be taken in by rip offs like this.
    But in this case I admit I didn't even look into the prices in Belfast as I'm very curious to see if this theatre is any good for opera, and if we don't put our bums on their seats there'll never be any opera there again. So I paid a hefty price for the privilege (or rather, my mother-in-law did).

    Anyway, they charge 125 in Wexford, so it's not like I've never paid that much before.....

    So I'll give them one chance. If it's no good, then I'll take my custom elsewhere.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,066 ✭✭✭Sandwlch


    westtip wrote: »
    I see that the Grand Canal Theatre thinks we are still in the Celtic Tiger: Ticket prices for the Scottish Opera LaBoheme range from 45 Euro in the cheap seats up to 125 euro for the most expensive.

    Where do they think they are? 75 or 125 buys you a good ticket in La Scala, Covent Garden, Berlin, Garnier, and Vienna. I dont think Scottish Opera or GTC rank with that grouping quite yet....
    E30 to E70 is typical rate for good standard opera in quality European opera houses outside those elite ones.

    Those prices are a good effort at killing off the chances of making opera a long term success there (maybe they saw the scam pulled by the Aida in the Point crew and are going for a similar kill the golden goose ploy).

    Originally intended to see Boheme in Belfast until I saw here the GCT was taking it, so planned to go there instead - to see what the theatre was like and to support the opera effort . Didnt think to look at prices though. But its back to the Belfast plan now - as handy for me since there on a regular basis - I dont even incur the extra travel costs of westtip's calculation.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,066 ✭✭✭Sandwlch


    Anyone any news of where OTC stands at the moment - no news of any upcoming production in a while. Are they in limbo pending reorganisation?

    Opera Ireland repeated their pattern of the Autumn recently - the concert performance outdoing the full production. Romeo et Juliette was very stodgy and lacking in dynamics.(btw: what was Romeo doing in a hoodie in the last scene??). I Capuletti e i Montecchi had more life to it despite the lack of stage production - and better singers all round. Overall both unremarkable though.


  • Registered Users Posts: 826 ✭✭✭Travel is good


    Dickerty wrote: »
    Went to see Romeo et Juliette on Sat in the Gaiety, my first Opera - was pretty impressive! My wife got the tickets, she's not a fan but even she came away very taken by it.

    Anyone else there? Was I just easily impressed, or was this better than average?
    I just found this thread and I'm delighted to see all that helpful info. & reviews of shows. I'm an amateur opera goer, but do love it. It's always scarce here in Ireland. I've been lucky enough to have visited the Met & City Opera in New York, and usually try to visit an opera wherever I travel. I'm visiting Budapest next month. The tickets (best seats up front) for the State Opera House for Romeo & Juliet are only €30! It's rip-off Ireland here!

    Like you all, I had my doubts about Aida in the O2 in December, so i wouldn't go as I didn't think the prices were worth it.

    I saw Romeo & Juliette in the Gaiety, and enjoyed it. I also saw Macbeth, though I wasn't so enamoured. I'm trying to be careful now about which operas I go to, so thank you all for the helpful advice. I'm going to the GCT tomorrow to see the ballet. I'd love to see an opera there, so will check out the tickets for La Boheme, thanks for the tip.

    I always enjoyed Lyric FM's broadcasts from the Met on Saturday nights, I could imagine myself there! So I'm happy to see the cinemas are playing the operas. I haven't gone to one yet, but I will.

    Keep up all the hard work, Westipp, and thank you everyone else!


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,066 ✭✭✭Sandwlch


    'Irish National Opera' Founded


    News Release: Monday 22 March 2010

    Minister Cullen announces foundation of Irish National Opera

    Martin Cullen TD, Minister for Arts, Sport and Tourism has today (Monday 22 March 2010) announced the foundation of Irish National Opera with the appointment of an Interim Board.

    Irish National Opera will be based in Dublin. It will perform opera at all scales in the capital and will continue the tradition of touring opera nationwide. The company will also encourage the development of opera in Ireland through the provision of opportunities for emerging Irish talent and with education and outreach programmes which will encourage more people to engage with and attend opera performances.

    The new Irish company will be forged from two State-funded companies, Opera Ireland and Opera Theatre Company which between them cover much of the range of artistic work that would be expected from a national opera company.

    Mr Ray Bates, former Director of the National Lottery has been appointed as Chairman of the Interim Board of Irish National Opera. He will be joined on the Board by Ms Virginia Kerr, Chairperson of Opera Theatre Company, Mr Thomas Lynch, Chair of Opera Ireland and Sir Brian McMaster, Chairman of the National Opera Studio in the UK and former Managing Director at the Welsh National Opera. When the Interim Board has completed its work, these members will continue to serve on the first full-term Board of Irish National Opera. To assist in transitional arrangements, the Chief Executives of Opera Ireland and Opera Theatre Company, Mr Niall Doyle and Ms Kirsty Harris, respectively, are also being appointed to the Interim Board for a period of three months.

    Minister Martin Cullen said: "This single unified Irish national opera company will have the remit and responsibility of providing both the highest possible quality opera experience to Irish audiences throughout the country and maximising the resources available so as to develop and encourage a thriving opera sector in the State."

    Minister Cullen said he was delighted the Chairman and members had "very willingly agreed to give their time and expertise to the Interim Board." He thanked them for their positive response to his invitation to serve saying: "You will make a very significant contribution to the work of this new company. I wish you well in your important roles over the coming months."

    The process of working towards the formation of a new Irish national opera company has been a collaborative one between the Department of Arts, Sport and Tourism, the Arts Council, Opera Ireland and Opera Theatre Company. Opera Ireland and Opera Theatre Company will continue their work throughout 2010, as both companies have been funded by the Arts Council to continue with their respective artistic outputs for all of 2010.

    Editor's note: The objectives for which Irish National Opera is established are:
    a) To produce and promote main-scale and chamber opera to the highest international standards and to tour such performances both nationally and internationally;
    b) To promote and encourage the experience of the company's opera productions to as wide an audience as possible through live performances and via radio, television, film and other media;
    c) To encourage the development of the opera industry through the provision of opportunities for emerging talent at all levels;
    d) To establish an innovative and diverse education and outreach programme;
    e) To develop opera as an art form through the commissioning and presentation of new work.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,282 ✭✭✭westtip


    Sandwich thanks for posting that news release up. It will all come down to money - I think Cullen wanted this to be his passing legacy after his stint at Arts Sports and tourism - but of course he is now body swerving on the setting up of the company. Personally I am dismayed at the loss of OTC the most creative company on the irish operatic scene, I just hope and pray the talent from that company is well utilised in the new National opera company - if dieter Kaegi is retained as the artistic director the project is dead in the water from day one.

    it will come down to one thing - funding and I can't see the committment needed for funding a real opera company coming from our Geovernment no matter what its fiscal position - we just don't don't have the creative minds in Government to appreciate opera.

    Scottish opera is the model they should follow.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 143 ✭✭JonnyBlackrock


    westtip wrote: »
    it will come down to one thing - funding and I can't see the committment needed for funding a real opera company coming from our Geovernment no matter what its fiscal position - we just don't don't have the creative minds in Government to appreciate opera.

    Scottish opera is the model they should follow.

    It's telling that Mary Hanafin's move from Welfare to Arts is seen as such a demotion.

    Remember that there are countries out there in which the arts are actually considered to be important. France, Germany, Austria, Italy and even the UK (only a country which thinks the arts are important can come up with a festival like the Proms) to name but a few.

    Arts are, and probably always will be, at the bottom of the pile in Ireland.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,282 ✭✭✭westtip


    yep Jonny you are quite right, I think Cullen just wanted to get this news release out before he left so he could claim the national opera company as his legacy - as opposed to e-voting machines. Of course the truth is it is just a cost cutting exercise - and sadly we are going to see the demise and dismantling of a highly creative unit in Opera Theatre Company, and I guess some kind of cobbled together version of Opera Ireland under another name. The money to put together somethign that might resemble a good strong regional opera company say like Scottish Opera, for sake of comparison, won't be forthcoming, the dogs on the street know that. For a country of our size and overall lack of commitment to the artform we all love, I am not optimistic about the new "national" opera company - Is anyone????


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 143 ✭✭JonnyBlackrock


    westtip wrote: »
    The money to put together somethign that might resemble a good strong regional opera company say like Scottish Opera, for sake of comparison, won't be forthcoming, the dogs on the street know that. For a country of our size and overall lack of commitment to the artform we all love, I am not optimistic about the new "national" opera company - Is anyone????

    Whatever about the Scottish Opera, as I don't know much about it although I'll know a bit more after I've seen their Boheme in June, why dont' they try to create something like the WNO? Wales only has a population of 3 million, but the WNO are superb, on the whole. Of course they've had their turkeys, but which opera company hasn't?

    The thing that's the most depressing about this country is the poverty of its ambition. It's always happy to be "second best" (or third or fourth), and comfortable to be "somewhere in the middle of the scale". Why not aspire to being the best?


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,066 ✭✭✭Sandwlch


    I dont think I would be optimistic as you say westtip, but I dont think I would be pessimistic either. I guess more of a status quo will pertain despite the reshuffling and renaming.

    The core issue is a very small opera going public in Ireland (and I do see this as a low demand leading to a small supply rather than vice versa). So there is only so much that can be done. (BTW, witness a discussion recently on OI's Romeo et Juliette on RTE's 'The View' - about as serious an arts review programme as our national broadcaster offers. One panelist clearly had no knowledge of opera and couldnt offer much more opinion than 'having a problem with people singing at each other').

    Hard to see how it can be developed. Maybe, rather than focusing on what a national company can do for us, we should give up flogging a dead horse, and as opera goers try to establish Ireland (and sorry for the Dublin bias again, but I suppose I do mean Dublin (only a provincial city in a British Isles context)) as a permanent fixture on the touring rota for the like of Scottish Opera, Opera North, Welsh National opera, and English Touring opera.

    Only thinking online here..........



    Sandwlch - the poster formerly known as Sandich - before the Boards hack of 2010.


  • Registered Users Posts: 15 PerriBlack


    It's telling that Mary Hanafin's move from Welfare to Arts is seen as such a demotion.

    Remember that there are countries out there in which the arts are actually considered to be important. France, Germany, Austria, Italy and even the UK (only a country which thinks the arts are important can come up with a festival like the Proms) to name but a few.

    Arts are, and probably always will be, at the bottom of the pile in Ireland.

    I think Mary Hanifan's appointment to the Dept of Tourism, Culture and Sports (as opposed to Arts, Sports and Tourism) is more a promotion for the department than a demotion for the minister. At least she understands the arts and is regularly seen attending opera in Ireland.

    Whilst the emphasis of the department is now clearly on tourism, in light of Farmleigh form, culture is now core to the tourism agenda. Whether this includes such 'foreign' forms of culture as opera remains to be seen. Yet in sport, look how well we do with a non-native sport such as rugby (recent Scottish match excluded). We could achieve the same success as Triple Crown, Grand Slam, Heineken Cup etc. in opera if the three (and soon to be two) opera companies are ambitious enough.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 9 goodlawd


    opera ireland has been hamstrung for a number of years due to a variety of problems. 1- "artistic direction" This appears to have been discussed here in depth and i cant disagree at all! 2- rte orchestra. this chews up a massive (approx 40%) of the budget and they hold the company to virtual ransom for different reasons.they are also a extremely awkward to deal with as they know there is no alternative. 3- the gaiety. the cost to rent the venue takes up another huge amount. it remains to be seen how the grand canal will effect the gaiety. i assume they will have to reduce their rent and buck up ideas. i hope the new company can rid itself of some of these problems and forge a new company that is dynamic, artistically sharp and yes, profitable (not to the detriment of ticket prices). as discussed here there examples abroad of smaller nations and companies who produce good fare. i for one would like to see a glyndebourne here. the weather tends to put the kibosh on that though!



  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,066 ✭✭✭Sandwlch


    OTC Lives.

    Marriage of Figaro on tour in May.

    http://www.opera.ie/Productions/currentproductions.htm


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 143 ✭✭JonnyBlackrock


    I got an e-mail today from Lyric Opera Productions about a concert performance of Lucia di Lammermoor.
    I've only been to one of their productions before - Madame Butterfly a few years ago. It was OK in its own way, but the orchestra was risible.
    Does anybody reckon that Cara O'Sullivan is up to the task of Lucia?


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1 Anniedublin77


    A friend of mine attended OTC's The Marriage of Figaro in the Samuel Beckett last weekend and loved it, I've just booked tickets to see it at the Civic Theatre out in Tallaght and was wondering has anyone else seen it and what did they think ??


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 143 ✭✭JonnyBlackrock


    A friend of mine attended OTC's The Marriage of Figaro in the Samuel Beckett last weekend and loved it, I've just booked tickets to see it at the Civic Theatre out in Tallaght and was wondering has anyone else seen it and what did they think ??

    It got a very bad review in today's Irish Times:
    http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/features/2010/0512/1224270200262.html

    I think I'll pass.


  • Registered Users Posts: 368 ✭✭clunked


    I got an e-mail today from Lyric Opera Productions about a concert performance of Lucia di Lammermoor.
    I've only been to one of their productions before - Madame Butterfly a few years ago. It was OK in its own way, but the orchestra was risible.
    Does anybody reckon that Cara O'Sullivan is up to the task of Lucia?
    I suspect the problem may not be the orchestra, rather the fact that Lyric I think prepares an opera performance with two 3 hour rehearsals. Obviously more rehearsal time would require a far greater spend and as a private company would make it uneconomic to run such shows. Catch 22.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 143 ✭✭JonnyBlackrock


    Is it my imagination or is the Scottish Opera Boheme at the Grand Canal Theatre being incredibly aggressively advertised, both on the radio and in the Irish Times.

    The tickets obviously aren't selling very well.


  • Moderators, Education Moderators Posts: 1,863 Mod ✭✭✭✭Slaanesh


    I have performed in Lyric Opera's Carmen as a chorus member. Can you tell me what you mean by "two 3 hour rehearsals?"
    clunked wrote: »
    I suspect the problem may not be the orchestra, rather the fact that Lyric I think prepares an opera performance with two 3 hour rehearsals. Obviously more rehearsal time would require a far greater spend and as a private company would make it uneconomic to run such shows. Catch 22.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,066 ✭✭✭Sandwlch


    Is it my imagination or is the Scottish Opera Boheme at the Grand Canal Theatre being incredibly aggressively advertised, both on the radio and in the Irish Times.

    The tickets obviously aren't selling very well.

    Not too surprising. They have seriously misjudged the price and its a shame. E105 in the stalls - which is far too expensive. In Belfast its only Stg38.5 for a stalls ticket. Maybe they are realising the mistake now, but its too late to change the prices (was the under 26 reduction offered from the beginning?). It will be a shame if there are only a handful of you there. I guess we will have a full house or as close as in Belfast.


  • Registered Users Posts: 368 ✭✭clunked


    Slaanesh wrote: »
    I have performed in Lyric Opera's Carmen as a chorus member. Can you tell me what you mean by "two 3 hour rehearsals?"
    2 Three hour orchestral rehearsals.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 143 ✭✭JonnyBlackrock


    Sandwlch wrote: »
    It will be a shame if there are only a handful of you there. I guess we will have a full house or as close as in Belfast.

    I'd say there will be more than a handful. I put in a fictive booking yesterday for Saturday June 19th, and only very marginal seats came up - all of them either right at the front or back, or on the far right or far left, so it looks like all the good seats are sold.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,282 ✭✭✭westtip


    Sandwlch wrote: »
    Not too surprising. They have seriously misjudged the price and its a shame. E105 in the stalls - which is far too expensive. In Belfast its only Stg38.5 for a stalls ticket. Maybe they are realising the mistake now, but its too late to change the prices (was the under 26 reduction offered from the beginning?). It will be a shame if there are only a handful of you there. I guess we will have a full house or as close as in Belfast.

    Hi guys I have been off this thread for a while great to see it has been kept going - now sandwich you have me on a pet subject here - Grand Canal Theatre have lost the plot with the pricing on LB from SO. Compared with the prices in Belfast -Tis a major blunder me thinks. Mind you the pricing itself is not driven by GCT as they are known as a "receiving house" they rent themselves out to companies/performers and comparing the prices in Belfast and dublin is not compring level playing fields.

    I have heard that GCT is very expensive to hire - and SO will need to recover costs once they cross the border; as the tour to Belfast will be unerwrittne to a certain extent by NI Arts council and the Belffast Grand Opera House is subsidised (i think) by Belfast City council and the NI Arts council - this all adds up to less cost per seat in the house that needs to be recovered in ticket revenue.

    I think it may sell quite well as the Dublin opera audience is starved of decent opera - but really La Boheme has got to be banker to sell out - imagine trying to sell say peter grimes at these prices (mind i would rather see Grimes any day of the week),

    However like Jonny I have done a check just now and typed in 10 tickets for the Saturday night - June 19th and you can get ten at any price apart from 45 euro (the lowest price) this seems to suggest it is sellling really badly and the "cheap" seats have gone - my guess is those that may have sat in the better seats in the past have bought the "cheap" seats as better value - you may end up with a very inbalanced house with the cheap seats sold out and the bottom half of the hosue struggling to sell - its on for four nights - with 2100 tickets to sell each night, that's 8,400 seats (an entire OI season would be less seats than this and that would be for two operas - the question arises does dublin even have an audience to sell 8,400 seats to its opera going public - is our opera going public as much as 8,400 in Dublin? or een Ireland for that matter), with the Belfast option for basically anyone living north of say Swords as a realistic option - taking out a huge swathe of potential customers - and considering we all want to see th new theatre (but not at any cost),

    And the option of getting an opera hit on June 10th of Tosca at Dundrum or Swords Cinema I reckon this all begins to look a bit worrying for SO and GCT, now I may be wrong - I won't be in GCT to find out - as i intend going to Belfast the week before.

    I know they have had a few complaints about the price differentials as said I will be cross border opera shopping!
    It got a very bad review in today's Irish Times:
    http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/features/2010/0512/1224270200262.html

    I think I'll pass.

    Jonny, Michael Dervan does sometimes talk through his backside! and forgets Opera is actually a form of entertainment, all I know is that everyone at the Hawkswell in sligo where I saw last week came out smiling - I posted a review via email to OTC which they posted on their Facebook page will paste up here. Anyway this is what I thought of OTC Figaro:

    Caught the Figaro last night in Sligo – congratulations to the company on
    yet another success – in particular to Annilese for a simple production
    With some lovely twists in the tail.
    ...Its difficult to bring freshness to a masterpiece, as ever OTC achieves
    A twist in the tail without imposing an “opinion” or statement of
    direction on a perennial favourite.
    The feisty sexiness and earthiness of Susanna for me the lynchpin of
    This production – the cast played out a story which has at its the essence
    The complicated nature of relationships between Men and Women, worker and
    master, Society and its mores, in a quite delicious combination of
    pantomime, the tragedy of lost love, the joy of new love and the comedy of
    misunderstandings we went from one emotion to the other – in the same way as
    we do in life. Little wonder this is such an enduring masterpiece – it is
    a timeless comment on humankind. The near end of term confinement of the
    Contessa was the lime instead of lemon in this delicious gin and tonic,
    A twist we didn’t quite expect but worked so well.
    You know seeing Figaro in this way I have come to the conclusion is the
    Only way to see this opera – written for the confines of the small court
    Theatres of the latter 18th century not the grand opera houses of the world
    – you need a good competent professional cast and an intimate theatre, as
    ever OTC assembled a fine cast of both singers and actors – whilst its
    great to hear the greats sing the roles like Figaro the Countessa and the
    Count, it is equally thrilling to see and hear the drama unfold in the
    intimacy of a small house, with good professional singers. The humankind
    experience of the work is so much stronger at the scale we saw last night.
    Once again. Well done. About my 30th Nozze di Figaro I would say, I gave
    up counting a long time ago. But it came to me as freshly as it is was the
    first performance I had ever seen. Congrats to all.
    A friend of mine attended OTC's The Marriage of Figaro in the Samuel Beckett last weekend and loved it, I've just booked tickets to see it at the Civic Theatre out in Tallaght and was wondering has anyone else seen it and what did they think ??

    Annie I hope you got to see this Figaro - the Irish Times Critic Michael Dervan tends to forget that opera is a form of entertainment and I think inserts an ice cube up his backside before he writes his somewhat pompous reviews. This was a lovely figaro and deserved its response from the audience.


    Take a look at what the OTC audience are saying about it on the OTC facebook site they love it!!! Its a bit late at night and I was going to post something up tongiht but did anyone else go the Rheingold cinema telecast from La Scala tonight? WOW.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 4,282 ✭✭✭westtip


    Sandwlch wrote: »

    The core issue is a very small opera going public in Ireland (and I do see this as a low demand leading to a small supply rather than vice versa). So there is only so much that can be done. (BTW, witness a discussion recently on OI's Romeo et Juliette on RTE's 'The View' - about as serious an arts review programme as our national broadcaster offers. One panelist clearly had no knowledge of opera and couldnt offer much more opinion than 'having a problem with people singing at each other').



    Sandwlch - the poster formerly known as Sandich - before the Boards hack of 2010.


    Sandwich just coming in on your comment re the View - this programme treats opera appallingly - they were as you say completely dismissive of the R&J, and I too recall that programme comment, it was the same when they reviewed the Tosca from the Met broadcast in September at the start of the Met High Definition broadcasts getting outside Dublin - they really belittled the whole thing - instead of saying too people do you know what if you are really scared of or know nothing about opera give this a shot. The presenters who clearly know absolutely nothing about opera reinforce the cliched view of opera and opera goers and do nothing to encourage people to go to oper - the View is a complete joke as an arts programme IMO.


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