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Light Recommendations (formerly Front Light For Dark Country) Road Commute

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Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 11,740 ✭✭✭✭tomasrojo


    https://www.rosebikes.com/bike-parts/bike-lights/battery-powered/headlights?brand%5B%5D=B+%2B+M&brand%5B%5D=Cateye

    Any of the 80 lux or higher B&M options in list above. They work on AA rechargeable batteries, allowing you to keep lamp going when batteries eventually degrade.

    Really nice light, works for 4 hrs plus on high setting.

    I'm sure there are other options with German manufacturers also.

    Using 1000+lumen mtb lights on a road is just acting the b0llix with other road users including other cyclists

    I got the Cateye Gvolt20 during the summer, getting ready for the darker days. It's one of the German-standard ones. I like it a lot. Again, uses AA rechargeables, which is what I wanted. It's only 10lux/20lux, but I find that's more than enough for city use.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,490 ✭✭✭hesker


    What would be considered too bright for road use.

    I have a Cateye Volt 800 that I always have on 400 lumen setting.

    I’ve had 2 complaints that it was too bright, one from a pedestrian and one from a cyclist. I now keep it pointed at the ground about 15 feet in front of me. No complaints since but still unsure if it is too bright

    Edit: Found some good info here.
    https://bicycles.stackexchange.com/questions/31557/is-it-possible-to-get-a-light-that-is-too-bright


  • Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 24,413 Mod ✭✭✭✭CramCycle


    hesker wrote: »
    What would be considered too bright for road use.

    I have a Cateye Volt 800 that I always have on 400 lumen setting.

    I’ve had 2 complaints that it was too bright, one from a pedestrian and one from a cyclist. I now keep it pointed at the ground about 15 feet in front of me. No complaints since but still unsure if it is too bright

    Edit: Found some good info here.
    https://bicycles.stackexchange.com/questions/31557/is-it-possible-to-get-a-light-that-is-too-bright

    A light which has a proper beam shape and angled correctly will rarely be too bright. One that is pointed upwards or has no beam shape has a good chance of appearing too bright. My edelux was as bright (or brighter) as dims on a modern car but the beam shape meant that when positioned properly, it never lit anything above the horizontal plane where it shone but the road an ditches would be illuminated for a few 100m below that plane. I had a Cateye Volt which was good, not as good as the Schmidt but once angled correctly achieved nearly the same effect. Its when you have lights that have no beam shape, like many MTB lights, that light everything up, that is when it is too bright.


  • Registered Users Posts: 9,400 ✭✭✭TheChizler


    How do people stop lights slipping round on the handlebar and pointing either down at the ground or into the eyes of oncoming traffic? I have them attached over some electrical tape which is an improvement but it still slips in wet.


  • Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 24,413 Mod ✭✭✭✭CramCycle


    TheChizler wrote: »
    How do people stop lights slipping round on the handlebar and pointing either down at the ground or into the eyes of oncoming traffic? I have them attached over some electrical tape which is an improvement but it still slips in wet.
    On the handlebar tape or a bit of an old tyre typically gives more grip, and thenn overtighten it.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 9,400 ✭✭✭TheChizler


    CramCycle wrote: »
    On the handlebar tape or a bit of an old tyre typically gives more grip, and thenn overtighten it.
    All my old tyres are blocky MTB style so not ideal! Might call down to the local bike shop see if they're throwing out any.


  • Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 24,413 Mod ✭✭✭✭CramCycle


    TheChizler wrote: »
    All my old tyres are blocky MTB style so not ideal! Might call down to the local bike shop see if they're throwing out any.
    Sorry, my bad, I meant tube not tyre. The tiny bit of compression means you can overtighten slightly and it gives good grip.


  • Registered Users Posts: 11,740 ✭✭✭✭tomasrojo


    CramCycle wrote: »
    Sorry, my bad, I meant tube not tyre. The tiny bit of compression means you can overtighten slightly and it gives good grip.

    Similarly: you get strips of rubber with some lock mounts and light mounts. I keep these, as they're handy for non-slip mounting. My Cateye headlight mount hasn't moved since I laid a one of the strips under the mount before tightening.


  • Registered Users Posts: 11,740 ✭✭✭✭tomasrojo


    CramCycle wrote: »
    A light which has a proper beam shape and angled correctly will rarely be too bright.

    If you get a light that meets the German standards (StVZO), it will have a nice beam, I think. Again, the GVolt20 I got has a very nice beam, not conical.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,171 ✭✭✭Rechuchote


    Thanks, helpful reviews. I'm trending towards buying the front light offered by an LBS, which has a softer city mode and a bright country mode (pic attached).

    For the back light, I'd stick with my SeeSense except that they tend to be killed by heavy rain. But it has two features that I like very much: it's very bright without being blinding, and its cadence changes according to your speed, so the blinks speed up as you slow, for instance for traffic lights. And it's Irish-made. (It can also be coded to your phone easily to "report an accident" if it thinks you've crashed.)

    Are there any other rear lights that alter the cadence of the flashes according to your speed, but are totally waterproof?



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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,171 ✭✭✭Rechuchote




  • Registered Users Posts: 7,205 ✭✭✭CantGetNoSleep


    Can anyone recommend a front light that mounts under a Garmin out-front mount - but can be moved between bikes easily?

    I have three bikes with the same Garmin mount (the newest extended one for the Edge 1030). I'd like something that isn't just a "be seen" light, but would be an added bonus if it comes from a family with the same mounting system so I would buy a cheaper light for the city, and something 1000lm+ for unlit roads.

    Either something that can easily move from one bike to another, or where I can buy three reasonably priced mounts so I move the light and leave a mount permanently under the Garmin out-front mount of each bike.

    I looked at the Garmin Varia, but that seems to have its own special out-front mount (i.e. not just something that attaches onto an existing Garmin mount) so I'd need to replace all three. Halfords have something that looks ideal but I can't figure out how the mounting system works.



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