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The Great Big Lawnmower Thread

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Comments



  • deezell wrote: »
    There should be some part of the mulch plug handle or assembly that engages the grass bag interlock button switch, otherwise the mower will act like the grass bag is off and cut the engine when you try engaging the blade. That or you have to replace the bag after you've inserted the plug to achieve the same effect.

    I might not have engaged the grass bag fully when I replaced it. Thank you, I'll give it another go.




  • deezell wrote: »
    There should be some part of the mulch plug handle or assembly that engages the grass bag interlock button switch, otherwise the mower will act like the grass bag is off and cut the engine when you try engaging the blade. That or you have to replace the bag after you've inserted the plug to achieve the same effect.

    Yup,
    Slammed the collector box shut this time. Worked fine.
    Then it rained....




  • Hi, Hopefully one of you guys can help me with this.

    I have a castlegarden TC102 (about 25 years old but like a friend to me) and the drive chain came off the back wheel. When I checked one of the Pinions was really badly worn. I managed to get the stuck chain from the back flywheel and get a new pinion and replaced it. I have linked two pics of the old pinion and the newly installed one. Thought I had it sorted but it came off the drive wheel again today during a mulch which is what I use it for now.

    The routing of the chain via the tensionor looks wrong but I believe that was the way it was before I replaced the pinion.
    The chain seems to go in both directions between the tensioner pinions.
    In one of the pics the chain is loose on the tension spring as its off the back drive wheel.

    The chain seemed tight enough when I put it back on but.......
    Is the routing correct?

    https://www.facebook.com/photo/?fbid=10219789362828158&set=pcb.10219789365588227
    https://www.facebook.com/photo/?fbid=10219789362868159&set=pcb.10219789365588227

    Many thanks for any help.

    Cheers,




  • scouser123 wrote: »
    Hi, Hopefully one of you guys can help me with this.

    I have a castlegarden TC102 (about 25 years old but like a friend to me) and the drive chain came off the back wheel. When I checked one of the Pinions was really badly worn. I managed to get the stuck chain from the back flywheel and get a new pinion and replaced it. I have linked two pics of the old pinion and the newly installed one. Thought I had it sorted but it came off the drive wheel again today during a mulch which is what I use it for now.

    The routing of the chain via the tensionor looks wrong but I believe that was the way it was before I replaced the pinion.
    The chain seems to go in both directions between the tensioner pinions.
    In one of the pics the chain is loose on the tension spring as its off the back drive wheel.

    The chain seemed tight enough when I put it back on but.......
    Is the routing correct?

    https://www.facebook.com/photo/?fbid=10219789362828158&set=pcb.10219789365588227
    https://www.facebook.com/photo/?fbid=10219789362868159&set=pcb.10219789365588227

    Many thanks for any help.

    Cheers,

    Some diagrams here.
    http://www.lawn-king.co.uk/downloads/57523339208_02_2013_12_54_22.pdf
    The tensioner pinion 38 on page 30 is held under spring tension againt the underside of the chain. There should be enough pressure to keep the chain slack to a minimum. A well worn chain will exceed the range of the tensioner, you might need to pop out a link pair. In my experience this chain could be very slack and not fall off unless the mower was jockied hard in reverse, the drive pressure is then applied to the tensioner. Older models had an adjustable fixed position tensioner, this looks to be a sprung self tensioning type. Is there free movement of the sprung pinion lever? It might be sticky. Also check that all the retaining bolts on the rear crown sprocket into the differential are tight and not sheared off. If this large sprocket becomes loose it will throw the chain.




  • scouser123 wrote: »

    I have a castlegarden TC102 (about 25 years old but like a friend to me).....
    I can't argue with that. Sad day when I sold off Larry here, in his 20s, to work in a nice small retirement garden..

    555580.jpg


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  • deezell wrote: »
    Some diagrams here.
    http://www.lawn-king.co.uk/downloads/57523339208_02_2013_12_54_22.pdf
    The tensioner pinion 38 on page 30 is held under spring tension againt the underside of the chain. There should be enough pressure to keep the chain slack to a minimum. A well worn chain will exceed the range of the tensioner, you might need to pop out a link pair. In my experience this chain could be very slack and not fall off unless the mower was jockied hard in reverse, the drive pressure is then applied to the tensioner. Older models had an adjustable fixed position tensioner, this looks to be a sprung self tensioning type. Is there free movement of the sprung pinion lever? It might be sticky. Also check that all the retaining bolts on the rear crown sprocket into the differential are tight and not sheared off. If this large sprocket becomes loose it will throw the chain.

    Thanks for the prompt reply Deezell , Jeez Larry looks even older than mine:-)
    Yes I have checked the diagram you sent but it only shows one pinion tensioner mine has 2. Nort sure if you could see my photos but does the routing of the chain look ok? I think it must be as I haven't taken it off. When you say the back sprocket I assume you mean the big threaded metal wheel connected to the back wheel? This does look on solid. I wondered had the sprockets become misaligned but its hard to see if they are all in a line. The two pinions do seem to move ok I will try to get the chain back on the back sprocket again at the weekend and see how much tension there is on the chain. Might get a better photo of it with the chain on. Might also try your suggestion of taking a link out - if I can find the connection point :-) Cheers again for your help. Much appreciated.




  • I was curious about the second arm in the picture. I thought perhaps it was the old one pushed in for the photo, but you say its additional. Is it also sprung, or fixed. It's not a mod done by some previous owner, or have you had this machine from new. 98 was the oldest 102 manual I could find online, I have a printout of my older one which had a single adjustable tension sprocket, no springs, it was probably 96-97 model, I bought it in 2001, came with the house.




  • deezell wrote: »
    I was curious about the second arm in the picture. I thought perhaps it was the old one pushed in for the photo, but you say its additional. Is it also sprung, or fixed. It's not a mod done by some previous owner, or have you had this machine from new. 98 was the oldest 102 manual I could find online, I have a printout of my older one which had a single adjustable tension sprocket, no springs, it was probably 96-97 model, I bought it in 2001, came with the house.

    Hi Deezell, I've had it from New - probably around 98 - as far as I know this was the original double pinion tensioner but I can't find any picture of that setup anywhere. The two pinions spread out a bit during operation and the chain runs between the two, top of the chain to the underside of one and the bottom of the chain to the top of the other if you get me. I'll try to take a photo of it actually operating. Cheers.




  • scouser123 wrote: »
    Hi Deezell, I've had it from New - probably around 98 - as far as I know this was the original double pinion tensioner but I can't find any picture of that setup anywhere. The two pinions spread out a bit during operation and the chain runs between the two, top of the chain to the underside of one and the bottom of the chain to the top of the other if you get me. I'll try to take a photo of it actually operating. Cheers.
    Looking at the parts diagram, the second arm is visible, but with no pinion attached, like it was optional. I'd expect it to be the case that the chain is sandwiched between them, as its bi directional, this arrangement allows a straight chain on the driving side and a tensioned chain on the slack side regardless of forward or reverse, the tensioner pair would just rotate together with the chain force.




  • deezell wrote: »
    Looking at the parts diagram, the second arm is visible, but with no pinion attached, like it was optional. I'd expect it to be the case that the chain is sandwiched between them, as its bi directional, this arrangement allows a straight chain on the driving side and a tensioned chain on the slack side regardless of forward or reverse, the tensioner pair would just rotate together with the chain force.

    Hi Deezell, I have attached two videos. One is the chain in forward/reverse motion and the other is me moving the tensioner to show the spring. I've checked and the spring pins are in the correct slots so the movement may be normal or just years of wear. Where the spring holder comes out the side of the mower frame it is bolted on but there a slotted section below it. I was wondering if this was for tensioning the chain in case of wear? Pic attached also. It looks like I could take the bolt out and move it down to the slot and this might tension the chain a bit more? The chain definitely looks looser on the bottom during reverse motion and I think its when its in reverse the chain slips off the toothed wheel at the back.
    https://www.facebook.com/1341894051/videos/pcb.10219810935247455/10219810934727442
    https://www.facebook.com/1341894051/videos/pcb.10219810935247455/10219810934927447
    https://www.facebook.com/photo?fbid=10219810977728517&set=a.10219789365548226

    Many thanks for your input.

    Cheers


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  • Anybody got any advice on what to do with a ride on mower thats not needed anymore, is there anywhere reputable that buys them, have a cub cadet tractor mower thats not needed sitting in my shed, few guys on done deal I tried they dont even reply, Is there an auction etc that I could put it into?




  • A question if I may.

    Years ago and I'm taking 35 at least, I lived beside a parkland area with convent, actually got a summer job working in Gardens and massive green house attached to the convent, long since gone now (South Dublin)

    I recall they had an extraordinary lawn mower, very large rear wheels and a clip on/off seat, acted like a ride on mower. It was a beast of a machine, quite fast and had a large cutting area. I can't recall if it had a rotary blade.

    Anyway, I've since moved rural, 20 year now, have over an acre of lawn spaces. I wondered is there a similar type of mower available still, I'm guessing not cheap but looking for a self propelled type machine that could also act as a ride on for larger areas. I say this as I've areas that where a ride on would not be practical.

    Any links, ideas apopeciated. Thank you

    Is maith an scáthán súil charad.






  • The clip on/off seat is called a sulky.

    35 years ago grass cutting was very different to it is now and cutting on an estate garden would be different again.

    You probably were using some form of cylinder mower without a grass box. Nearest thing that may still be available is the Haytor Condor with a cylinder.

    If you want the fastest machine with the biggest cut and a great finish then a "triple" is worth looking at. The Allen National used to be a good one and Saxon made another but I don't think they are in business anymore but did find this https://www.baronessuk.com/product/lm180c/

    Wake me up when it's all over.





  • The clip on/off seat is called a sulky.

    35 years ago grass cutting was very different to it is now and cutting on an estate garden would be different again.

    You probably were using some form of cylinder mower without a grass box. Nearest thing that may still be available is the Haytor Condor with a cylinder.

    If you want the fastest machine with the biggest cut and a great finish then a "triple" is worth looking at. The Allen National used to be a good one and Saxon made another but I don't think they are in business anymore but did find this https://www.baronessuk.com/product/lm180c/

    Thanks for that, I think you correct re it being cylinder type mower, I'm actually thinking it may have been a webber if that makes sense. The machine you linked to certainly a beast, I've seen golf course, local authorities use similar and I'd assume seriously expensive :)

    I'll continue my search but appreciate the response, thanks :)

    Is maith an scáthán súil charad.






  • The thing is that mower could have been another 35 years old when you used it making it 70 years old now.

    Its the very large rear wheels that I can't relate to any mower I can think of that also had a sulky.

    When you say large wheels I think of the wheels on an Allen Scythe which is another monster altogether.

    Most cylinder mowers would have a rear roller so no need for big wheels and the "reel" mowers (just a jargon the guys I worked with used for a cylinder mower for rough work) would have barrow sized tyres on it.

    Then there were some setups that had a huge cylinder mower that could be used by hand on the main lawn but could be hitched up to a couple of towed cylinder mowers and a seat for parklands some of those had larger drive wheels on the attached cylinders. The other type I can think of was the multi tool machine where one prime mover engine and wheels had loads of attachements.

    Heres an example that fits the bill

    1950s-1960s-man-father-mowing-grass-driving-riding-large-lawnmower-towing-two-boys-sons-brothers-each-sitting-in-a-wagon-g5630-hel001-hars-old-fashion-1-mower-silly-wagon-juvenile-comic-safety-teamwork-lawnmower-mowing-sons-joy-lifestyle-brothers-rural-home-life-copy-space-full-length-persons-males-risk-siblings-transportation-fathers-bw-goals-humorous-happiness-high-angle-chore-strategy-dads-progress-recreation-comical-innovation-a-in-opportunity-sibling-using-connection-towing-yard-work-conceptual-lawn-mower-comedy-imagination-wagons-creativity-growth-juveniles-mid-adult-mid-adult-man-2BW886C.jpg

    Wake me up when it's all over.





  • The thing is that mower could have been another 35 years old when you used it making it 70 years old now.

    Its the very large rear wheels that I can't relate to any mower I can think of that also had a sulky.

    When you say large wheels I think of the wheels on an Allen Scythe which is another monster altogether.

    Most cylinder mowers would have a rear roller so no need for big wheels and the "reel" mowers (just a jargon the guys I worked with used for a cylinder mower for rough work) would have barrow sized tyres on it.

    Then there were some setups that had a huge cylinder mower that could be used by hand on the main lawn but could be hitched up to a couple of towed cylinder mowers and a seat for parklands some of those had larger drive wheels on the attached cylinders. The other type I can think of was the multi tool machine where one prime mover engine and wheels had loads of attachements.

    Heres an example that fits the bill

    1950s-1960s-man-father-mowing-grass-driving-riding-large-lawnmower-towing-two-boys-sons-brothers-each-sitting-in-a-wagon-g5630-hel001-hars-old-fashion-1-mower-silly-wagon-juvenile-comic-safety-teamwork-lawnmower-mowing-sons-joy-lifestyle-brothers-rural-home-life-copy-space-full-length-persons-males-risk-siblings-transportation-fathers-bw-goals-humorous-happiness-high-angle-chore-strategy-dads-progress-recreation-comical-innovation-a-in-opportunity-sibling-using-connection-towing-yard-work-conceptual-lawn-mower-comedy-imagination-wagons-creativity-growth-juveniles-mid-adult-mid-adult-man-2BW886C.jpg

    Well well, that looks like what I was referring too :), there was just a cutting section at the very front. That's some photo, blast from the past :) not sure health and safety would approve of kids following behind these days :)

    Is maith an scáthán súil charad.






  • Just purchased A Mountfield 1530h today, being delivered tomorrow.
    I have 3/4 of an acre which takes 5 hours with the 21 inch self propelled.

    Looking forward to using it.




  • scouser123 wrote: »
    Hi, Hopefully one of you guys can help me with this.

    I have a castlegarden TC102 (about 25 years old but like a friend to me) and the drive chain came off the back wheel. When I checked one of the Pinions was really badly worn. I managed to get the stuck chain from the back flywheel and get a new pinion and replaced it. I have linked two pics of the old pinion and the newly installed one. Thought I had it sorted but it came off the drive wheel again today during a mulch which is what I use it for now.

    The routing of the chain via the tensionor looks wrong but I believe that was the way it was before I replaced the pinion.
    The chain seems to go in both directions between the tensioner pinions.
    In one of the pics the chain is loose on the tension spring as its off the back drive wheel.

    The chain seemed tight enough when I put it back on but.......
    Is the routing correct?

    https://www.facebook.com/photo/?fbid=10219789362828158&set=pcb.10219789365588227
    https://www.facebook.com/photo/?fbid=10219789362868159&set=pcb.10219789365588227

    Many thanks for any help.

    Cheers,
    Sorry, just seeing this now. Boards new post notifications seems to be gone on the blink, 5 days or more before email arrives.
    Anyway, I don't think the chain should be that loose, the two tension sprockets are practically touching, the chain traverses are almost rubbing.Have you tried to spread them and check if the spring is being extended by any amount? You might need to lose a link pair, if there's a split link then its not a huge job, if you know how the file down the pins clinch, prise off the outer link side and or use a pin punch to drive out the pin. Must be plenty of videos on YouTube. Chains stretch and sprockets wear, properly you replace all when tensioning reaches it's limit, I've had to do this on various motorbikes belonging to my lads over the years, safest approach, but for everything thing from my first bike to farm machines and combine harvesters, it was often necessary to drop a link pair to restore tension. Eventually worn main sprockets will defeat even this, as the wear shortens the sprocket pitch, while the chain stretch lengthens it, causing links to eventually 'ride' the sprocket teeth, and break or throw the chain. Could be lethal on a motorbike. Certainly very expensive on the common BMW N47 2l diesel engine timing chain, which I'm sure some readers here have gashed their teeth over when they heard the chain chatter that preceded a potential chain jump, timing failure, and engine valve destruction. More than €2k if you changed it in time, Up to €6K some paid, and if it broke while driving......But I'm rambling. Check the lateral play in the chain, you'll know if the slack is too great. Popping a link pair might,/should work short term, unless chain and sprockets are worn to sh*t.




  • deezell wrote: »
    I can't argue with that. Sad day when I sold off Larry here, in his 20s, to work in a nice small retirement garden..

    and what did you replace it with?




  • deezell wrote: »
    Sorry, just seeing this now. Boards new post notifications seems to be gone on the blink, 5 days or more before email arrives.
    Anyway, I don't think the chain should be that loose, the two tension sprockets are practically touching, the chain traverses are almost rubbing.Have you tried to spread them and check if the spring is being extended by any amount? You might need to lose a link pair, if there's a split link then its not a huge job, if you know how the file down the pins clinch, prise off the outer link side and or use a pin punch to drive out the pin. Must be plenty of videos on YouTube. Chains stretch and sprockets wear, properly you replace all when tensioning reaches it's limit, I've had to do this on various motorbikes belonging to my lads over the years, safest approach, but for everything thing from my first bike to farm machines and combine harvesters, it was often necessary to drop a link pair to restore tension. Eventually worn main sprockets will defeat even this, as the wear shortens the sprocket pitch, while the chain stretch lengthens it, causing links to eventually 'ride' the sprocket teeth, and break or throw the chain. Could be lethal on a motorbike. Certainly very expensive on the common BMW N47 2l diesel engine timing chain, which I'm sure some readers here have gashed their teeth over when they heard the chain chatter that preceded a potential chain jump, timing failure, and engine valve destruction. More than €2k if you changed it in time, Up to €6K some paid, and if it broke while driving......But I'm rambling. Check the lateral play in the chain, you'll know if the slack is too great. Popping a link pair might,/should work short term, unless chain and sprockets are worn to sh*t.

    Thanks Deezel, I stripped down the tensioner and removed the spring. It actually looked ok so I turned it around (don't ask me why) and put it back on. When I tightened it all back the top tensioner wheel is now straight up and doesn't move and the bottom one is down but springs/tensions up and down with the mower forward and back motion. Chain seems tight on back sprocket wheel now. I tried it on the back garden and it seems fine. Can't understand why it looks ok now after just replacing it and putting back together but the way it is now looks more sensible. Chain and tensioner pinions separated. Will give it a good run at the weekend to see. Jaasus I might get another year out of it yet :-) Thanks for all the help.


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  • fryup wrote: »
    and what did you replace it with?

    A Viking 6127.ZL, a 22hp 50 inch cut huge MFer!
    Used with 60 hrs on the clock, half new price.

    556633.jpg




  • Just purchased A Mountfield 1530h today, being delivered tomorrow.
    I have 3/4 of an acre which takes 5 hours with the 21 inch self propelled.

    Looking forward to using it.

    Used it yesterday.
    I have 3/4 acre which I was cutting with a self drive 21 inch .
    It used to take 5 hours.
    Did the whole place in 2 hours yesterday.

    Its a beast.








  • New Home wrote: »
    Any views on this one, please?

    At least you can use it from a 3 pin plug, unlike their current cordless special buy which requires two 20v 4ah batteries, not included, hopelessly out of stock due to world shortage. and no idea when they'll be available. They're asking up to £70 each on ebay.
    Tip: two of the smaller power tool 2ah ones will work, but for half as long and with the risk of excess demand on the smaller ( or less numerous) cells.




  • What would be the smallest size ride on with a mulcher on that would be worth getting to save time time cutting a half acre? *smallest cause want to keep cost down and shed entrance is narrow.

    Or do the smaller ones even come with a mulcher?

    Roughly what would I need to budget for a good secondhand one.

    Assume this is too big for half acre?
    deezell wrote: »
    A Viking 6127.ZL, a 22hp 50 inch cut huge MFer!
    Used with 60 hrs on the clock, half new price.

    556633.jpg

    60 hours for half the price of new sounds great - suppose depends on the new price!! .

    Am I fooling myself looking for a small one?




  • cathy427 wrote: »
    What would be the smallest size ride on with a mulcher on that would be worth getting to save time time cutting a half acre? *smallest cause want to keep cost down and shed entrance is narrow.

    Or do the smaller ones even come with a mulcher?

    how about a buggy style ride on like this one, should be narrow enough for most garden sheds, just make sure the horsepower (HP) is above 10

    as for mulching all you need do is just plug the back shoot so that the cuttings don't go into the collection box, some hard cardboard would do the trick




  • I am on a 1/2 acre, so I think I have about half of that in grass. I got a Castelgarden XDC150HD for €2500 in april (From the Stiga family). It has a mulching option, with a 250l collector box. Takes about 30 minutes to cut everything. An hour to do it by the book (criss cross)
    Looking around that's kind of the standard. Go for something without a collector and you'll be around the €2000 mark, though prices increased recently.
    You'll get cheaper 2nd hand, but this could be a false economy when you end up replacing belts, blades or engine parts..




  • cathy427 wrote: »
    What would be the smallest size ride on with a mulcher on that would be worth getting to save time time cutting a half acre? *smallest cause want to keep cost down and shed entrance is narrow.

    Or do the smaller ones even come with a mulcher?

    Roughly what would I need to budget for a good secondhand one.

    Assume this is too big for half acre?



    60 hours for half the price of new sounds great - suppose depends on the new price!! .

    Am I fooling myself looking for a small one?

    Etesia 80cm cut, mulch, bag and side discharge.

    Cut in the wet.




  • Etesia is fine if you have €5k to spend. Otherwise this 72cm cut for little over €2k,
    https://monaghanhire.com/products/castelgarden-tractor-xf135hd-72cm-rider-hyd-352cc-engine

    or this 80cm ride on tractor for about €2.5k
    https://monaghanhire.com/products/castelgarden-xdc140hd-tractor-mower


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  • deezell wrote: »
    Etesia is fine if you have €5k to spend. Otherwise this 72cm cut for little over €2k,
    https://monaghanhire.com/products/castelgarden-tractor-xf135hd-72cm-rider-hyd-352cc-engine

    or this 80cm ride on tractor for about €2.5k
    https://monaghanhire.com/products/castelgarden-xdc140hd-tractor-mower

    Etesia is better though. 😬


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