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Wooden Windows?

  • 24-06-2009 9:01pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 1,309 giftgrub


    Howdy

    First time posting in this part of Boards...

    Anyways we've just bought our first house and while we have the money we want to get the windows done, theyre currently old single panes

    We're looking at wooden double glazing, but so many places seem to do PVC

    Does anyone know of any Dublin based companies that do wood, and is the cost way more that the PVC?


Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 14,523 ✭✭✭✭ Poor Uncle Tom


    Any good joiners will make the windows for you. They use Iroko (commonly mis-referred to as Teak) and are a beautiful window, imo. You should get far in excess of 20 years out of them if they are maintained. I have found they usually cost about 15-20% more then PVC.

    Look up joinery in the yellow/golden pages.


  • Registered Users Posts: 758 gears


    giftgrub wrote: »
    Howdy

    First time posting in this part of Boards...

    Anyways we've just bought our first house and while we have the money we want to get the windows done, theyre currently old single panes

    We're looking at wooden double glazing, but so many places seem to do PVC

    Does anyone know of any Dublin based companies that do wood, and is the cost way more that the PVC?


    If you have existing wooden windows and the frames are in a good condition, you could look at simply changing the glass to double glazing.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,149 ✭✭✭ Yellow_Fern


    There is a great company in Kells and another in Trim that do great wooden windows. Try visiting the show rooms. Both very nice people.

    If you motivation is a warmer house, usually windows is not the most cost efficient option. Another point I want to stress is that window companies will install windows and try to minimise the impact of the job on your wall. But often there is small alterations to the wall and around your wall that can make a big difference, especially if you have a cavity wall. Window companies wont tell you this this because it is beyond their brief, well unless it is a new build when these things can be easily done. Id advise you to trace your hand around the window board and try to see if there are any draughts around the window board.



  • Registered Users Posts: 9,775 ✭✭✭ Effects


    I imagine in the past 13 years, since they first posted, they have already replaced the windows. 😂



  • Registered Users Posts: 591 ✭✭✭ C. Eastwood


    giftgrub

    Do yourself a favour and install maintenance free - Double Glazed PVC Windows.

    No paint.



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  • Registered Users Posts: 9,775 ✭✭✭ Effects




  • Registered Users Posts: 591 ✭✭✭ C. Eastwood


    Yes they look excellent and can be purchased in wood grain effect. No painting whatsoever.



  • Registered Users Posts: 2,149 ✭✭✭ Yellow_Fern


    The never look as good. If you are really clever about design, wooden windows can last a long time. I was visiting a ruin recently. A CoI church. Total shell. Abandoned in 1923. Nothing inside but actually many of the wooden window frames remain. I think Irish architects dont design windows so careful as they could be to create a maintenance free window.



  • Moderators, Home & Garden Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators Posts: 16,298 Mod ✭✭✭✭ DOCARCH


    Would have to disagree. Always look cheap IMO! Alu-clad timber the way to go for appearance and no maintenance.

    BTW....this thread is 13 years old so replying to the OP probably a little pointless at this stage!



  • Registered Users Posts: 9,775 ✭✭✭ Effects


    Wood grain effect is even worse than standard coloured PVC in my opinion.

    Aluclad would always be my preference.



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  • Registered Users Posts: 6,049 ✭✭✭ Fighting Tao


    Interesting to see this conversation pop up. Moved into an 80’s house with wooden windows. Previous owners double glazed it but there is still a number is issues. Mainly, windows have become warped or swollen and are difficult to open or not sealed as a result. The exposed hinges are another issue as we are about 250m from the sea as the crow flies. Another is the amount of condensation I know that is not exclusively the windows fault, but there is also insufficient drainage when it does drip down

    I have been contemplating getting just the opening part lf the windows replaced but there may be warp in the frames too, or the only alternative to see me out would be PVC.



  • Registered Users Posts: 9,775 ✭✭✭ Effects


    I've a friend with a house on an island on the west coast. The sea weather really takes it's toll on the windows. Rationel aluclad. Nothing warped, but aged fairly rapidly.



  • Registered Users Posts: 21,323 ✭✭✭✭ Esel


    You could fit brass hinges and sort the closures out by sanding and fitting rubber seals. Possibly drill drain holes to exterior if suitable ? (just spit-balling on this, probably many good reasons for not drilling... 🤔)

    Not your ornery onager



  • Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 13,527 Mod ✭✭✭✭ ednwireland


    got iroko windows in 1999 (double glazed) they done the job but always leaving them too long between varnishing.

    the patio door was always a disaster never fitted 100% and just got steadily worse.

    replaced patio door with aluclad triple glazed and transformed the sun room and heat retention.

    -snip-

    personally would prefer something with less maintenance !

    Post edited by BryanF on


  • Registered Users Posts: 631 ✭✭✭ houseyhouse


    Recently bought a house with a mix of white and fake wood pvc windows. The fake wood ones are just awful looking. Notice several small commercial/ apartment developments near me have painted over ugly fake wood pvc in grey and it’s a big improvement from the outside anyway.



  • Registered Users Posts: 325 ✭✭ fatty pang


    If they are that good and “maintenance free” why are so many of them falling apart and being replaced ?

     "You only fit double glazing once. So fit the best - Everest."



  • Registered Users Posts: 325 ✭✭ fatty pang


    The concept of ‘no maintenance’ for any window is likely to lead to problems especially when there are moving parts and in proximity to the coast.

    There are numerous alu-clad timber designs – some designed for our climate and others not particularly suitable.



  • Registered Users Posts: 325 ✭✭ fatty pang


    .....At least until the grey paint starts to peel away.



  • Registered Users Posts: 631 ✭✭✭ houseyhouse


    Yes! It’s only been a couple of years but that’s already started in some places. Still when passing by it looks much better than it did before



  • Registered Users Posts: 827 ✭✭✭ kabakuyu


    Had iroko georgian style windows in my house, built in 1981. Replaced with high quality anthracite pvc windows in 2017.I looked to keep the iroko/teak but the glass window units had broken down and 90% of all glass needed to be replaced, the whole job was cost prohibitive as some windows had 18 individual glass units and it was cheaper to install modern looking low maintenance windows.While the iroko was still perfect I had to coat every window frame every 2 years due to my coastal location.Glad I went for the pvc and contrary to belief they can look great, just make sure you think long and hard about openings,trickle vents, and most importantly colour and style.



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  • Registered Users Posts: 591 ✭✭✭ C. Eastwood


    I have white d.g. pvc windows 41 years old. All perfect. Like new and no maintenance.



  • Registered Users Posts: 2,149 ✭✭✭ Yellow_Fern


    Probably because it is a good quality window and in a good gentle location. I had one PVC window 2005 that broke horribly 2 years after buying it. Accoya wooden window frames can last 50 years with no painting.



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