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Old Primary school Irish books 1988-1995

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  • #2


    Kojak wrote: »
    Was there not another grammer book with a purple colour that done the same thing (i.e. Past, Present and Future tense in irish)? I can't say I remember an orange coloured book, but I do remember a purple one.

    Ceart Litriú? Not sure if I spelt that right (ironically!). There was also Ceart Litriú 2, with a green cover.

    I remember having Siúil Liom and Rith Liom in 1st and 2nd class, I found the drawings disturbing for some reason (the same artist did some stories in the Magic Pencil (3rd class English), I think it was a Flat Stanley extract. In 3rd class we had Bun Go Barr (1996/97) so that must have been around the time the change took place.

    Oh and Tara & Ben FTW! Who could ever forget the story about the toothpaste factory overflowing (which now that I think about it made no logical sense as surely they would have run out of raw material before it got to that extent - major plot hole).

    I did work experience in a primary school later on, now instead of Tara & Ben they had "Len & Jen", which were some kind of blob creatures. Seemed like they dumbed down the course, having the main characters as humans must have been seen as too complicated for Infants to understand by then.

    In 6th class we had three maths books, Busy at Maths, Figure it Out and some other one, Sums Okay sounds familiar for some reason...


  • #2


    a friend in his 80's is keen to re-read a school book named OLD JOHN- HAS ANYONE HEARD OF OR GOT ONE.


  • #2


    We started off with the series of "FÁS" books up to 4th class I think.
    Then a new series of Irish schoolbooks came out,with names like Féasta,Coillte,Sléibhte,Tonnta and Gleannta.

    We had workbooks called Bí Ag Obair and Lean Ag Obair.
    We also used Anseo Is Ansiúd réamhleabhar and bunleabhar.
    I think all books were written by C.S. Ó Fallúin.


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