Advertisement
Boards are fundraising to help the people of Ukraine via the Red Cross at this horrific time. Please donate and share if you can, you will find the link here. Many thanks.

Which degree for most lucritive job?

  • 19-03-2007 10:48pm
    #1
    Closed Accounts Posts: 496 ✭✭ juanveron45


    I know its not the best reason to do something but I was wondering what area is best to get into if making money is your main aim, what degree should one go for?

    Also disregard law and medcine or anything you would have to do 7 years in uni or college for ,Im talking 4 years of a bsc degree?


«1

Comments

  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,312 rediguana


    Actuarial Science.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 13,310 Kinetic^


    rediguana wrote:
    Actuarial Science.

    Ditto.

    How long to be a pharmacist? Pretty high earning job.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 208 ✭✭ Absolut


    If you want to follow the natural progression from a degree in actuarial science to becoming a qualified actuary, then there'll be a few more years of study and exams. A four year BSc will allow you to work in a lot of different jobs, but not as an actuary (which is extremely highly paid, so I'm assuming that's what you were referring to when you said actuarial science - but also very difficult to suceed in).


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 496 ✭✭ juanveron45


    Any others, give as many examples as you can


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,505 Nehpets


    Entrapenuer (SP!!)


  • Advertisement
  • Registered Users Posts: 697 justfortherecor


    A degree in financial services or the like from LSE/Oxbridge.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,312 rediguana


    Nehpets wrote:
    Entrapenuer (SP!!)


    Entrepreneur is maybe the best. A money expert once told me I'd never become a millionaire working for someone else. Unfortunately I misinterpreted that advice and have now been unemployed (or "underemployed", at any rate) for some time.

    The point is, set up your own successful business and you get to keep the profits. You don't even need to go to college at all, technically.


  • Registered Users Posts: 742 easyontheeye


    an IT degree! :D ... or eh maybe not :confused:


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,276 damnyanks


    Your degree does not push you into the most lucrative areas. All it does is show you are interested in the area.

    If you want to earn big bucks, be good at what you do and constantly look to push yourself.

    If you want to earn a decent amount of money and do shag all go become a teacher or some form of civil servant where its more difficult to get fired from.

    You want a 1st class degree from a good University on a decent course to ensure more doors are left open for you.

    A couple of years ago everyone wanted to go into actuary because the money was great.

    Now everyone wants to become an accountant because the money is great

    The newer trend developing is everyone wants to become a "investment banker"

    And before those 3 you had everyone wanting to become a programmer of some sort.


    Just go for what you like - all of the above pay ****e if you suck. They pay amazing if you are good.


  • Registered Users Posts: 27,645 ✭✭✭✭ nesf


    damnyanks wrote:
    Just go for what you like - all of the above pay ****e if you suck. They pay amazing if you are good.

    Exactly. Most high paying jobs only work well if you are good at them. Sales can pay out absurd amounts of cash, if and only if you are good at it. Ditto with IT, law etc. Doing something you are only mediocre at will never earn you a lot of money. You'll plateau at middle management and be stuck there, generally speaking.


  • Advertisement
  • Registered Users Posts: 2,783 ✭✭✭ Vikings


    I know its not the best reason to do something but I was wondering what area is best to get into if making money is your main aim, what degree should one go for?

    Also disregard law and medcine or anything you would have to do 7 years in uni or college for ,Im talking 4 years of a bsc degree?

    From reading all of your threads in this forum its is quite apparent that money is your main drive, the thing is you don't want to work towards it!

    You are going to have to start off on the ground floor just like everyone else, find something you are interested in (may I suggest banking as you are obviously fascinated by money) and work hard at it. There is good money to be made in every field of work out there, it is only the select few that earn it though as they are mostly passionate about what they do


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,312 rediguana


    From reading all of your threads in this forum its is quite apparent that money is your main drive, the thing is you don't want to work towards it!

    You are going to have to start off on the ground floor just like everyone else, find something you are interested in (may I suggest banking as you are obviously fascinated by money) and work hard at it. There is good money to be made in every field of work out there, it is only the select few that earn it though as they are mostly passionate about what they do

    Ok, well yes, if you're a pleb at your job you're unlikely to become wealthy through it.

    But the OP was emphasizing money (and why wouldn't he?) and that coloured everyone's answers.

    But, all things (effort, talent, luck etc) being equal, there are still vast wage differentials between certain professions. I read the wall street book, "Liar's Poker" recently, where obscene amounts of money were being thrown at twentysomething traders. Yes, this was back in the crazy eighties, but still.

    Work hard and be a brilliant teacher (which, despite what someone earlier on said, is no easy life) and you'll still be attached to a very ordinary pay-scale. Well, it's not bad, but you can forget about Ferraris and Cristal.

    Anyway, just to reiterate - financial services gets my vote. But OP, remember - work hard and stay in school.

    ps. My dissolute buddy carved out a lucrative niche for himself as a UK-based dentist. I don't know how much he earned, but one minute he was a student selling his jeans to friends to fund clubbing, the next he's wracking up speeding fines in his Porsche Boxster and beating off the lovely ladies with a stick. Initially difficult to get into dentistry, but then you're done, no more exams. In fact, his biggest problem is boredom (cleaning teeth here, pulling them there). But you want that MONEY, don't you, Mr. OP? You want that PAPER??? Look into dentistry, if you hate finance.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,276 damnyanks


    Just some info concerning trading / banking as people seem to read those little books about how great it was or fun it was etc.

    1 - For the first 4 / 5 years your hourly wage averages out to 6 pounds an hour. (M&A)

    2 - They fire you the second any sort of downturn happens

    3 - The money you get is a %%% of what you have earnt. Earn nothing - please **** off (A bank pays aaround 500k a year for 1 trader's deskspace).

    So while you shouldn't BS and say money isn't important don't just be some fool that jumps into an industry because it has the highest salary.

    No such thing as a free lunch in life.


  • Registered Users Posts: 18,589 ✭✭✭✭ Stephen


    Dentistry sounds ideal if you're a sadist. What other job pays so much to inflict pain on others?


  • Registered Users Posts: 68 ✭✭✭ Copper


    Good tradesmen earn very decent wages, its also very easy to set up your own company and earn a fortune (if you're willing to work like a horse).


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,265 ✭✭✭ DubTony


    nesf wrote:
    ..... Sales can pay out absurd amounts of cash, if and only if you are good at it.
    Nehpets wrote:
    Entrapenuer (SP!!)

    I know a guy who used to make about £75,000 a year as a salesman (yes ... POUNDS) and started his own business about 5 years ago. He's 34 and is doing well to make €35,000 a year now.

    If sales is your gig you're most likely better off working for someone else and being great at it. As an entrepreneur you'll need many, many more skills. You can hire salesman, but hiring someone to run your company is a lot tougher.

    I have my own business and do ok, but I'd be a lot better off doing 40 hours for €60K a year (average for what I do) instead of working 70 hours a week.

    Look to a degree in business and then decide whether to go further. If you're the entrepreneurial type then I'd say business finance is the way to go. Know how to get and handle money, learn to negotiate well, and let others do the donkey work.


  • Registered Users Posts: 7,639 PeakOutput


    engineering degree tbh

    something like 85% of managing directors in all companies are engineering graduates


  • Registered Users Posts: 7,639 PeakOutput


    Copper wrote:
    Good tradesmen earn very decent wages, its also very easy to set up your own company and earn a fortune (if you're willing to work like a horse).

    yep a mate of mine got 600 points in the leaving and refused to go to college so his dad got him an apprenticeship as an electrician he realised he loved it and is half way threw the apprenticeship doing a elec engineering degree aswell and already has a 2007 motorbike and an audi a1(think a1 the golf like one) and he is only 20................he is an exception though and you gotta be very determined and hard working to come near to what he has done


  • Moderators, Arts Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 9,139 Mod ✭✭✭✭ BossArky


    PeakOutput wrote:
    engineering degree tbh

    something like 85% of managing directors in all companies are engineering graduates

    That sounds stat sounds incredibley wrong. No way 85%. Did you read it in an engineering journal such as IEI by any chance?


  • Registered Users Posts: 7,639 PeakOutput


    BossArky wrote:
    That sounds stat sounds incredibley wrong. No way 85%. Did you read it in an engineering journal such as IEI by any chance?

    no i cant remember exactly were i heard it reading back over it it does sound way to high but it is a very large number


    edit; now that i think of it im pretty sure it was years ago in school at a career talk or something


  • Advertisement
  • Moderators, Arts Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 9,139 Mod ✭✭✭✭ BossArky


    It obviously depends on what venn diagram you're talking about. E.g. Ireland Vs City of London. I'm sure Ireland has heaps of engineers in those types of positions... where as London would be more businessy.. from my experience.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,783 ✭✭✭ Vikings


    rediguana wrote:
    Ok, well yes, if you're a pleb at your job you're unlikely to become wealthy through it.

    But the OP was emphasizing money (and why wouldn't he?) and that coloured everyone's answers.

    But, all things (effort, talent, luck etc) being equal, there are still vast wage differentials between certain professions.

    I completely agree with you there. Yes money should be an important factor but not the only factor.

    OP, you need to find something you are interested in. Stop starting 20 threads a day asking about different lines of work and think about what you would like to be doing yourself, what you can see yourself doing in 5 years, for the rest of your life etc... once you get into a profession there is money to be made as long as you have the will to work for it.

    No such thing as easy money no matter what job you are in


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,276 damnyanks


    And whenever you do get into college make sure to do a work placement for 9 - 12 months even if the university doesnt offer it as part of the course (Take a year out).

    Its useful on so many levels its not even funny.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 2,268 mountainyman


    Insurance and Investment at City University would have the best tradeoff between the brains needed to get in and the salaries you receive at the end.


    MM


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,779 ✭✭✭ amen


    the 85% is wrong sort of
    its based on a report done about 5 years ago in the USA (I'll see if I can find the link).

    they looked at the top several thousand companies in the USA (based on turnover, staff etc) and they looked at the qualifications of the executive board and senior managers

    Approx 80% of top managers/ceo had Engineer/Physics Degress, 10% had Maths degress and the everything else in last 10%.

    think about it. Most companies are technology dependant and/or manufacture some thing hence a large number of technology based people.

    If you have have a company that makes widgets who do you want as the boss? Some bean counter or arty/business type who doesn't really under stand what you do or someone who knows what you do, how it works, what its for etc.

    Think of the all the companies in Ireland even the USA ones Intel, HP etc they all have technology people as the head. I think even Air Lingus with Wille Walsh( think he had a B.Eng).
    Several top civil servants in UK have B.Sc/B.Eng same here.

    I agree some financial companies may have business types as their heads but I bet apart from the financials you will find a lot that have B.Eng/B.Sc at the top.

    Actually a log of the top finance companies use science grads to create their mathamatically modesl in order to maximise their profits. The maths is normally very complex and requires specialist skills ( not going to get a business grad to do that)

    It is very easy to teach business skills to anyone (mostly commone sense) after college but very hard to teach scientific skills after college. Once you have a good science background its easy to learn the business stuff and progress that way.

    Of course you should pick a subject you like not just one you think will you good money.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,300 ✭✭✭ xebec


    If you definitely want money, but don't want to cut down your options about exactly what you want to do then consider Management Science & Information Systems Studies in TCD.

    My class are graduating this year, with a wide variety of careers prospects and wages. At the top of the earning bracket are those going into trading for an investment bank and those going into consulting (like me) who can expect to start on more than £30,000 plus a sign-on and rising steadily from there - the trader could be earning mega bucks within a year, it's all about talent in that business. Of those in Ireland, the highest offer this year is for a consultancy offering €30,000, with most other graduate programs in the mid-20 thousands.

    Afaik, everyone in the class who wants a job for next year already has at least one offer.


  • Subscribers Posts: 16,425 ✭✭✭✭ copacetic


    PeakOutput wrote:
    engineering degree tbh

    something like 85% of managing directors in all companies are engineering graduates

    This doesn't sound at all right and I'm an engineer. I'd say that 70% of all CEOs were accountants and about 15% engineers.

    It doesn't make any sense, how many companies are engineering based? Certainly less that 50% of companies. Why would at least 40% of companies that aren't engineering based have engineers as CEO?

    I'd like to see some linkage to back up the original claim.


  • Subscribers Posts: 16,425 ✭✭✭✭ copacetic


    amen wrote:
    Think of the all the companies in Ireland even the USA ones Intel, HP etc they all have technology people as the head. I think even Air Lingus with Wille Walsh( think he had a B.Eng).
    Several top civil servants in UK have B.Sc/B.Eng same here.
    .

    :confused:

    Mark Hurd has a BA in Business and Otellini's degree is in economics.

    edit: and Willie Walsh was a pilot and MBA.


  • Registered Users Posts: 27,645 ✭✭✭✭ nesf


    xebec wrote:
    If you definitely want money, but don't want to cut down your options about exactly what you want to do then consider Management Science & Information Systems Studies in TCD.

    My class are graduating this year, with a wide variety of careers prospects and wages. At the top of the earning bracket are those going into trading for an investment bank and those going into consulting (like me) who can expect to start on more than £30,000 plus a sign-on and rising steadily from there - the trader could be earning mega bucks within a year, it's all about talent in that business. Of those in Ireland, the highest offer this year is for a consultancy offering €30,000, with most other graduate programs in the mid-20 thousands.

    Afaik, everyone in the class who wants a job for next year already has at least one offer.

    BIS in UCC has a similar "prospectus". Honestly, the real world and what they promise you in uni are not one and the same. The degree you do has far less of an impact on what jobs you can get than people think (excluding professions like Engineering, Medicine etc). I'm not cutting down your degree or anything, I'm sure the top half of your class will get excellent jobs but the people coming out and scraping 2.2's or passes mightn't find life so rosy and with the way grade inflation is going a 1H degree today is worth a lot less than a 1H degree 5 or 10 years ago, which also plays a factor.


  • Advertisement
  • Registered Users Posts: 68 ✭✭✭ Copper


    yep a mate of mine got 600 points in the leaving and refused to go to college so his dad got him an apprenticeship as an electrician he realised he loved it and is half way threw the apprenticeship doing a elec engineering degree aswell and already has a 2007 motorbike and an audi a1(think a1 the golf like one) and he is only 20................he is an exception though and you gotta be very determined and hard working to come near to what he has done


    I would definitely recommend a trade or any construction related degree if you want to make money OP.

    sorry nesf


Advertisement