Enygma Registered User
#1

Don't laugh, I've only really found out about these

What are they? Is there anywhere I can download samples? Would anyone be willing to send on theirs just so I can rip it off....uhh I mean take ideas from it...yeah...that's right....ideas.

No, seriously, wtf is it?

cheers.

WhiteWashMan Registered User
#2

a cover letter is a small note you atach to the front of your CV that basically says hi, im such and such, ive heard about the position going doing such and such, id like to apply
thanks very much.
consider it a formal written version of an answer machine message.
i'll try and dig some out if i can find them. actually i think ive binned all mine, but i think monster have some sone i will try and dig some out for you to peruse.
good point though.

actually, its just struck me now thatthe little box with other info that you fill in on web sites is pretty much the same idea as a cover letter.
its really just somewhere you can add in company or job related specifics that dont fit into your CV.

sort of.

you know.

erm.

let me look it up

WhiteWashMan Registered User
#3

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Winning Cover Letters
Top Ten Reasons Why You Need a Cover Letter
by Peter Newfield
Your cover letter presents your intentions, qualifications, and availability to a prospective employer in a succinct, appealing format. It's your first chance to make a great impression, a personalised letter indicates you are serious about your job search. Your CV can give the nitty-gritty of dates, places of employment, and education but your cover letter must entice the reader to take the extra few minutes to consider you when faced with hundreds and thousands of candidates for any one job opening.

1. Do you really need a cover letter?
You bet! Just as you would never just show up unannounced at a prospective employer's door, your CV should Never just appear solo on a decision- maker's desk. Your cover letter is your first opportunity to introduce yourself, present your qualifications, and show the search committee you are a potential candidate for the advertised position.

2. Personalise it to the company.
Anyone can reproduce a "canned" cover letter and hope for the best. Instead, take a few minutes to personalise your letter by showing that you are really serious about working for the companies you are contacting. State the reason that you are interested in working for that particular company. Mention a department, a new project the company is involved in, an acquisition the company has made. Show that you have done your homework. Address the cover letter to a specific individual whenever possible.

3. Why are you sending your CV and cover letter?
Cover letters should be clear and to the point. Include the specific job title, two to three reasons why your experience makes a good fit, and a brief outline of career highlights.

4. Highlight your strengths!
You may be a great person and never call in sick, but prospective employers really want to know why they should consider you for this position. Brag a little! Give a few facts, list relevant skills, and state accomplishments on your present or most recent jobs that will be impressive. Increased overseas sales by 93%? Negotiated new financial leases/loans? Implemented new training programs which reduced staff turnover by 15%?

5. State your intentions and qualifications right up front.
If you expect a senior personnel manager or recruiter to wade through a mish- mash of information on your cover letter before understanding why you are sending your CV, chances are, it will never happen.

6. What makes you different?
Emphasise your skills, talents, and experiences to show how you would be a valuable addition to the team. If you have relevant volunteer or professional experience include it briefly in your cover letter. Example: An accountant who serves as volunteer treasurer for a nonprofit community health organisation; an international sales rep who has lived in Europe and Asia and speaks several languages.

7. No negative information!
Never include personality conflicts with previous employers, pending litigation suits, or sarcastic remarks in your cover letter. If you are bad-mouthing your present place of employment, interviewers may fear a repeat performance if they hire you.

8. When should you include salary/relocation information?
The rule of thumb is to always include salary requirements and/or salary history in the cover letter if a prospective employer requests it. For example: My salary requirements are $60,000-$75000 (negotiable). Or: My current salary is $53,000 at XYZ corporation. To eliminate this information from your cover letter may justify your CV getting tossed out. Never include salary and relocation information on your CV, only address this information in your cover letter.

9. Action Steps to Take
Take a proactive approach in your cover letter. State the fact that you are available for a personal interview; give your home, work, e-mail, and/or cell phone numbers where you can be reached; note that you will follow up by phone (where possible) to provide any additional information required.

10. Be direct!
A professionally written cover letter and CV can open the doors to your next position on the corporate ladder, as well as a new career in a different field. A clean, error-free presentation combined with strong phrasing and solid facts will encourage the reader to review the attached CV and call you in for an interview.

Peter Newfield is President of CV writing service Career CVs.

Enygma Registered User
#4

Cheers WWM!

Really helpful, maybe now I might actually get some replies.
I've also heard that you can arrange a meeting with people in FAS who will help out making your CV and cover letter.

Maybe you should put that article into a sticky.

WhiteWashMan Registered User
#5

Originally posted by Enygma
Cheers WWM!


Maybe you should put that article into a sticky.


you sensible chap.
done!

Static M.e. Registered User
#6

Just a likkle note as ive been sending out my cvs for the past month with cover letters and all typed up nice to every recruitment agency and joe soap who posts an job ( which is surprisingly little ) i just learned that your cv you send to the
recruitment company just gets editeded down and your cover letter canned
Wahts up with that?

note to wwm. that company adc in galway for that chap looking for some temp work , unfortunatly wouldnt give me anymore info
on what exactly they were looking for or if they were willing to help , just a send in the cv and well talk then attitude
sorry for late response been away for a week

sci0x Banned
#7

Can anyone give an example of a cover letter they have written? I'm applying for a job and need the perfect cover letter. I can't find any examples on the net so hoping someone here could write me an example of something they have written.

Magic Monkey Registered User
#8
sovtek Registered User
#9

Originally posted by WhiteWashMan


8. When should you include salary/relocation information?
The rule of thumb is to always include salary requirements and/or salary history in the cover letter if a prospective employer requests it. For example: My salary requirements are $60,000-$75000 (negotiable). Or: My current salary is $53,000 at XYZ corporation. To eliminate this information from your cover letter may justify your CV getting tossed out. Never include salary and relocation information on your CV, only address this information in your cover letter.


IMHO the only reason anyone would need this info for is to get you a lower salary than they are willing to pay. I made a rule to never say what I'm currently making before they told me a salary range they are willing to pay. Any time I haven't stuck to that I've ended up making less than I could have.

catho_monster Registered User
#10

the job of my dreams has come up.
cv & cover letter to be in by tomorrow.

it may sound stupid, but i want to get this right,

do you attach the cover letter to the cv, or keep the two seperate??

thanks

WhiteWashMan Registered User
#11

are you sending in paper format or email?
or fax?

if you are using gfood old fashioned paper and snail mail, then i would just use a paper clip and clip the cover letter to the front of your cv, which i would staple.
otherwise, i would just email them in as two seperate files.

catho_monster Registered User
#12

@$#%@%$

i had to have it in yesterday, and i didnt know, so i stapled it all together.

#@$Q%$@#

WhiteWashMan Registered User
#13

shouldnt worry about it to be honest.

the presentation and layout of your cv, and the uality of your cover letter are what are important.

staples in your cover letter wont really make or break an interview opportunity.


'hey this guy rocks, look at his cv'

'bloody hell!, he does rock!. hold on, whats this?'

'what?'

'he's stapled his cv and cover letter together! i mean wtf?!'

'oh no! what a shame, and i think he could have been the youngest CEo this company has ever seen...'


cant see it happening myself

2 people have thanked this post
catho_monster Registered User
#14

thanks anyway,

appreciate the reply!

crapjocks Registered User
#15

imo they are a waste of time. Too much waffle found in many which may lead to recruiters disinterest

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