vinnyfitz Registered User
#1

Some curious lines here

Eircom to extend broadband upgrade plan
Eircom is extending its network upgrade programme to enable more people to receive broadband and reverse a fall-off in subscribers for high-speed internet.

The company confirmed yesterday that it has introduced a new programme to fix the 22 per cent of phone lines that currently cannot carry broadband services to Irish homes and businesses.

David McRedmond, Eircom's commercial director, said the firm estimated that it could upgrade at least half the lines that currently fail line tests for broadband.

He said engineers would be dispatched to people's homes to upgrade lines if they agreed to make a firm order for broadband.

The new upgrade programme is also being made available for customers seeking a service from rival firms such as BT Ireland.

Up until now, Eircom has been criticised for the high percentage of its lines that are unable to provide broadband services.

Even under the new programme, about 9 per cent of lines will not be able to provide the internet service because these homes and businesses are more than four kilometres from a telephone exchange.

Eircom's upgrade programme occurs as the firm reported a drop-off in the rate of increase in broadband subscribers over the past few months.

About 140,000 people have signed up for broadband that runs on Eircom's network.


© The Irish Times

cgarvey Registered User
#2

A lot of releases, but nothing firm yet.. sales are still denying all knowledge (I just called there for the craic), and no mention on the web site.

damien Registered User
#3

Same with BT. Seems it was a race to get the press releases out and they forgot to communicate the process to the staff.

#4

Apparently BT's doing a big drive on customer service (Their massively weak point!) They've a good marketing opportunity to turn over a totally new leaf with a completely new brand. So, I assume they're trying to come across as the good guys.

eircomtribunal Registered User
#5

This is nothing but the press release for the much heralded "amber" program, which McRedmond talked about at the Galway bb event.
I find it amazing again and again that even the IT journos fall for the Eircom spin:

The company confirmed yesterday that it has introduced a new programme to fix the 22 per cent of phone lines that currently cannot carry broadband services to Irish homes and businesses.

Eircom cannot promise to fix "the 22 per percent of phone lines" that currently cannot get bb, because currently around 40% of lines cannot get broadband (20% are not on bb enabled exchanges, from the ones on enabled exchanges at least 22% fail – and the figure is probably higher in reality)
David McRedmond, Eircom's commercial director, said the firm estimated that it could upgrade at least half the lines that currently fail line tests for broadband.

Same here: Eircom can only promise to fix half of the lines that fail of those which are on bb enabled exchanges and not of those which fail the line test. "Upgrading" (in reality cleaning up substandard lines) "half the lines" is not fixing the 22%, it is only fixing half the problem.

Even under the new programme, about 9 per cent of lines will not be able to provide the internet service because these homes and businesses are more than four kilometres from a telephone exchange.

What McRedmond said in Galway:line failures will be looked at under the "amber" scheme, but not the lines with carriers, which he said were in 5% to 6% of lines.
The above statement would indicate a change of policy on the part of eircom, as the article only refers to lines outside the 4km limit as being left out in the cold. I don't think Eircom has changed its mind on the line splitters.

If I remember rightly, and I may well be wrong, Redmond put the figures like this:
4% of lines too long, - no can do
5-6% impeded by carriers, -no can do without dosh from gov
the rest, 11-12% with flaws in the line that would be tackled with amber.

So it seems Eircom has conveniently included the pair gain lines into the lines with distance problems.

P.

lucernarian Registered User
#6

I am sick to my teeth of Eircom claiming that a line of a greater length than 4 km is unsuitable for broadband. The ordinary limit for the ADSL standard is 18000 feet (about 5.5 km) and it seems that telecos like BT in the UK can achieve much more than this. Even if a line was too long by any standard, DSL repeaters can be used at a small cost to Eircom. I estimate that it would be easier to install a repeater than remove a pairgain. But repeaters would make common sense...

Mr_Man Registered User
#7


Eircom's upgrade programme occurs as the firm reported a drop-off in the rate of increase in broadband subscribers over the past few months.


If the rate of increase is plateauing then it will be interesting to see what new offers Eircom will make in July to (re)stimulate demand.

While fixing the lines is a good thing for those who fit the fairly restrictive criteria (and I would also suggest that the cost of fixing the line is an unstated one) I don't believe there is enough potential subscribers in that category to enable the 500k target to be hit.

Big price cuts will be needed, something along these lines would be nice

The U.S.'s second-largest phone company, SBC Communications Inc.,
(SBC) announced it would offer high-speed Internet access for $14.95 a
month for new residential subscribers who order SBC Yahoo! DSL Express,
making its broadband package cheaper than many competitors' dial-up
services


M.

SkepticOne Awaiting Email Confirmation
#8

Mr_Man
While fixing the lines is a good thing for those who fit the fairly restrictive criteria (and I would also suggest that the cost of fixing the line is an unstated one) I don't believe there is enough potential subscribers in that category to enable the 500k target to be hit.
So you reckon Eircom are worried about take up figures?

jmcc Hackwatch
#9

eircomtribunal
This is nothing but the press release for the much heralded "amber" program, which McRedmond talked about at the Galway bb event.
I find it amazing again and again that even the IT journos fall for the Eircom spin:

They are still the same old technology journalists. Not really any surprise there.

What McRedmond said in Galway:line failures will be looked at under the "amber" scheme, but not the lines with carriers, which he said were in 5% to 6% of lines.
The above statement would indicate a change of policy on the part of eircom, as the article only refers to lines outside the 4km limit as being left out in the cold. I don't think Eircom has changed its mind on the line splitters.


The simple reason for this spin is that NTL is now operational with cable broadband in Galway and Waterford. Thus there is a competitor for Eircom that is not dependent on Eircom's last mile. Furthermore by introducing a voice product later this year, NTL becomes a serious player. NTL's dublin net may be old a patchy but they will eventually upgrade it so that the same services available on the more advanced Waterford and Galway nets will be available in Dublin. And guess where a sizable percentage of Eircom's subscribers live?

Regards...jmcc
[ObSpeculation] If these tjs keep falling for the same old lines, perhaps it time to get back in the tech news business.[/ObSpeculation]

#10

Does NTL in Dublin not offer everything and more (digital channels) than they do in Galway and Waterford.

SkepticOne Awaiting Email Confirmation
#11

paulm17781
Does NTL in Dublin not offer everything and more (digital channels) than they do in Galway and Waterford.
The infrastructure in many areas of Dublin doesn't allow two-way services like broadband.

jmcc Hackwatch
#12

SkepticOne
The infrastructure in many areas of Dublin doesn't allow two-way services like broadband.
Yep. At a local NTL open meeting, it was pointed out that Waterford and Galway are modern nets and have the capability to supply broadband to 100% of the nets. This is a completely different situation to NTL in Dublin where some of the net will require upgrades and investment to reach a standard capable of offering broadband. The bandwidth on the Waterford and Galway nets (TV wise) is apparently 550MHz though I'd have to check notes and accuracy on this.

Regards...jmcc

Sponge Bob Banned
#13

Some of it is even 800Mhz I think ....

#14

Are there already analogue repeaters or amplifiers on the longer lines?
i.e. could they be causing problems similar to the pairgain issues?

Clanc Registered User
#15

So far my line is plain old red - not a hint of any other colour, except maybe blue in the face from getting nowhere with eircom;-(
As far as I know I'm not too far from the exchange, I live in a new house in a new estate and some of my neighbours within the estate have BB.
What do they mean by those lines "impeded by carriers" ?
Could this have an impact on line quality that I would not otherwise be aware of?

Cheers
Clanc

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