donkeyoaty0099 Registered User
#1

Hi all

This seems like a stupid question but I'm all at sea here. I have a relatively large kitchen with separate dining room off. I have a vision of rearranging the kitchen, knocking through to the dining room, and making a small sitting space in the space that would be opened up. While this looks lovely in my head, I can't grasp if the space would work or be too cramped. Who or what profession do I need to have a look at this for me. I don't want to go full architect of at all possible as it's a relatively small job and I feel the expense would be wasted. But maybe that's what I need. Anyone any advice

tradesman Registered User
#2

A builder you can trust to give good advice, not just someone who tells you it will work just to get the work. Intrrior designers, Friends, relations. You head will most likely be spinning afterwards with all the advice!

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antoinolachtnai Registered User
#3

This is not the answer to your question, which is a very difficult one, but it might help.

Get some squared paper and draw out the rooms to scale. Make some photocopies and draw in the furniture and fittings as accurately as you can in various configurations (or use cut outs so you can move fittings around).

If you put in the time this will give you a good idea of what is possible. It will make discussions with builders, designers, etc much more productive.

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Samuel T. Cogley Registered User
#4

Got my garden done for about 10K. Smallish job. Absolute dogs dinner and no formal drawings to fall back on. Beware saving money it can cost a fortune.

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LirW Registered User
#5

Samuel T. Cogley said:
Got my garden done for about 10K. Smallish job. Absolute dogs dinner and no formal drawings to fall back on. Beware saving money it can cost a fortune.


Like garden garden as in landscaping?
If so, that's some serious money, I'm shocked! Looking into landscaping myself and I know there's no open end but 5k here can buy me a seriously nice makeover from a professional company.

Anyway OP, I'd honestly consult an architect because their job is it to visualise it to you. I found builders aren't that great at this. I always say if you're in doubt on how it's going to look, consult a professional, it's their job. You might get away with a good interior designer too that has a bit of a clue about architecture and isn't only spoofing about the latest trendy colour scheme.

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donkeyoaty0099 Registered User
#6

Thanks all. Think the safe bet is architect. I'm pretty inexperienced home renovation wise so probably best to spend up front to make sure it's done right first time

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Moomintroll99 Registered User
#7

You could have a quick play around in an online tool like Roomsketcher (that's one but there would be loads of others I'm sure), which lets you place walls, kitchen units etc & then see it from different viewpoints. Would give you a vague idea at least what might work.

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Doop Registered User
#8

Dont want to confuse the issue, but an Architectural Technician, Building Surveyor, Interior Architect, would all be able to draw this up for you, at potentially cheaper rates.

Where are you based?

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donkeyoaty0099 Registered User
#9

Doop said:
Dont want to confuse the issue, but an Architectural Technician, Building Surveyor, Interior Architect, would all be able to draw this up for you, at potentially cheaper rates.

Where are you based?


Dublin.

Doop Registered User
#10

donkeyoaty0099 said:
Dublin.


You shouldn't be short of locating any of the above so.

I suppose in theory you are looking for someone to do a measured survey of the areas concerned, draw scaled drawings of what you are thinking of and potentially propose an alternative option if applicable.

Only potential issue is, is the wall to be knocked a stud or solid wall.

seamus Dental Plan!
#11

If it's a block wall between the kitchen and dining room, then don't try to cheap it. The wall could be structural meaning it can't just be "knocked through".

A stud wall is less likely to be structural/load-bearing, especially if the house is 30+ years old. But if it's a newer house, a stud wall could be load bearing and you'll need the architect/engineer.

Samuel T. Cogley Registered User
#12

I'd personally also suggest the use of a solicitor in drawing up the contract between you and the builder. Exactly what needs to be done referencing the drawings, what payments will happen at what stage and don't be shy in telling the to feck off if at some stage you're not happy with the work being carried out (with good reason of course).

I wish I'd followed my own advice.

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donkeyoaty0099 Registered User
#13

seamus said:
If it's a block wall between the kitchen and dining room, then don't try to cheap it. The wall could be structural meaning it can't just be "knocked through".

A stud wall is less likely to be structural/load-bearing, especially if the house is 30+ years old. But if it's a newer house, a stud wall could be load bearing and you'll need the architect/engineer.


It's stud and house is old. But I'm going to get an engineer to sign it off anyway to make any potential sale a bit easier down the road

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KKV Registered User
#14

Can you not just make some furniture out of cardboard boxes and play with them? See if you reckon you've enough space from that?

Figure out what you plan to put where, mark each cardboard box as that item and tweak it until you're happy. Measuring a room, and then measuring the size of the chair/s etc. you want to use won't be that hard and I'm confident an architect isn't going to do anything you could do yourself with a measuring tape and an hour of your own time..?

listermint Registered User
#15

Samuel T. Cogley said:
I'd personally also suggest the use of a solicitor in drawing up the contract between you and the builder. Exactly what needs to be done referencing the drawings, what payments will happen at what stage and don't be shy in telling the to feck off if at some stage you're not happy with the work being carried out (with good reason of course).

I wish I'd followed my own advice.


Followed your own advice....

Who pays 10k for landscaping.

That's not advice that is a head scratcher

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