rochetara16 Registered User
#1

Hi everyone,

I've just started in a new job and it is nothing like I thought it would be. In the ad and during the interview I was led to believe it was an entry level marketing job. Once in the office I was told that the secretary was leaving next week and I would be doing her job (plus the marketing).

As well as this, I have to help build the website using software I've never used before. I decided I would give it a go and see if I could figure it out but it's much more difficult than I thought.

On top of this I don't really want to be a secretary. I'm only 2 days in but I've not signed any contracts yet so I feel it's better to leave now so as not to waste their (or my own) time. I'm gutted because the job description was exactly what I was looking for.

How do I tell them this in the nicest possible way?

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Doop Registered User
#2

I would suggest staying quiet... 2 days is not very long. Let the week finish out and see how you feel then give it a second week if you still feel the same simply sit down and say the position is not for you.... it happens.

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BrokenArrows Registered User
#3

rochetara16 said:
Hi everyone,

I've just started in a new job and it is nothing like I thought it would be. In the ad and during the interview I was led to believe it was an entry level marketing job. Once in the office I was told that the secretary was leaving next week and I would be doing her job (plus the marketing).

As well as this, I have to help build the website using software I've never used before. I decided I would give it a go and see if I could figure it out but it's much more difficult than I thought.

On top of this I don't really want to be a secretary. I'm only 2 days in but I've not signed any contracts yet so I feel it's better to leave now so as not to waste their (or my own) time. I'm gutted because the job description was exactly what I was looking for.

How do I tell them this in the nicest possible way?


Just arrange a meeting with your manager and explain that took an entry level marketing job and you dont want to be a secretary.

Explain that you dont know how to use the website building software and need training.

I think the website building part might be good experience for you and you might learn some marketing skills from it. Knowing how to interact with web users is a good marketing skill.

As for the secretary i fully understand your desire to not want to do this.

Just be straight forward with your manager. You dont want to be a secretary.

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BrokenArrows Registered User
#4

Doop said:
I would suggest staying quiet... 2 days is not very long. Let the week finish out and see how you feel then give it a second week if you still feel the same simply sit down and say the position is not for you.... it happens.


I dont think its as straight forward as "the position is not right for you".

The position was taken with the understanding it was a marketing position. If they wanted to be a secretary then they would have applied for a secretary job.

It needs to be made clear to their manager that she isnt happy being a secretary and will not hang around if that remains the case.

Its very common in junior roles for them to get very little experience in the role they are supposed to be learning. The OP will inevitably end up being a secretary most of their time and learning nothing about marketing.

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rochetara16 Registered User
#5

Thanks everyone for replying.

At the moment it's not an 'if I leave' but a 'when I leave' because I know I'm not the right person for the job and I feel guilty for 'depriving' the company of having someone more suitable and depriving someone who would thrive in the role.

Usually in jobs if I don't know how to do something I go learn how to do it and I take everything as a learning experience so when I was asked to help out with the website I didn't mind. I thought it would be a good experience and I would learn useful skills. But the job required is much bigger than I thought and far above my knowledge level. They really need an expert.

I also asked the current secretary what her role entailed before I left this evening and I was very surprised at the kind of duties she performs for the company (I've yet to receive training for the role which is why I asked her). She told me she stocks the staff room with milk/coffee and such and cleans the toilet as well as secretarial duties like answering phones and handling paperwork. She didn't tell me I'd be cleaning the toilet but it was implied. Now, I've cleaned toilets for a living while in college, I have nothing against it, but it was not in the ad nor mentioned to me in the interview and I don't want to go back to cleaning toilets for work.

I don't like giving up but this job is really not what I was led to believe it was.

mulbot Registered User
#6

rochetara16 said:
Thanks everyone for replying.

At the moment it's not an 'if I leave' but a 'when I leave' because I know I'm not the right person for the job and I feel guilty for 'depriving' the company of having someone more suitable and depriving someone who would thrive in the role.

Usually in jobs if I don't know how to do something I go learn how to do it and I take everything as a learning experience so when I was asked to help out with the website I didn't mind. I thought it would be a good experience and I would learn useful skills. But the job required is much bigger than I thought and far above my knowledge level. They really need an expert.

I also asked the current secretary what her role entailed before I left this evening and I was very surprised at the kind of duties she performs for the company (I've yet to receive training for the role which is why I asked her). She told me she stocks the staff room with milk/coffee and such and cleans the toilet as well as secretarial duties like answering phones and handling paperwork. She didn't tell me I'd be cleaning the toilet but it was implied. Now, I've cleaned toilets for a living while in college, I have nothing against it, but it was not in the ad nor mentioned to me in the interview and I don't want to go back to cleaning toilets for work.

I don't like giving up but this job is really not what I was led to believe it was.



Hi,I was on the same situation about 18 months ago(different sector).After the 1st week I realized the position wasn't as described and wasn't going to be, so I went to speak to the owner/boss. I offered to work the next week,which was accepted and we parted on good terms, You need to be honest here with the company but more honest with yourself.

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BarryD2 Registered User
#7

rochetara16 said:
Usually in jobs if I don't know how to do something I go learn how to do it and I take everything as a learning experience so when I was asked to help out with the website I didn't mind. I thought it would be a good experience and I would learn useful skills. But the job required is much bigger than I thought and far above my knowledge level. They really need an expert.


Whatever about cleaning the jacks, you shouldn't jump to conclusions regarding managing the website. Two days is really very little time. One of the lessons I've learnt in life is to persevere for at least a decent period. Usually things get easier, clearer and more manageable if you stick at something that initially appears difficult or even impossible.

rochetara16 Registered User
#8

BarryD2 said:
Whatever about cleaning the jacks, you shouldn't jump to conclusions regarding managing the website. Two days is really very little time. One of the lessons I've learnt in life is to persevere for at least a decent period. Usually things get easier, clearer and more manageable if you stick at something that initially appears difficult or even impossible.


It's not just managing the website, that I can do and have done before. Their entire website is barely working correctly. I don't want to go into too much detail about the site issues but they are vast and really need someone with experience to fix. I know basic html but what they need is a programmer. I'm really not comfortable working with the site in case I break it further.

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mulbot Registered User
#9

It's not just managing the website, that I can do and have done before. Their entire website is barely working correctly. I don't want to go into too much detail about the site issues but they are vast and really need someone with experience to fix. I know basic html but what they need is a programmer. I'm really not comfortable working with the site in case I break it further.[/QUOTE


Hope you don't mind me asking,but is it your instinct that it this jobjust isn't right for you?

molly09 Registered User
#10

Could you stay in the job while you look for something more suitable. Working doing anything will help to build your experience rather than not working.
You will still get to see/ involved in some marketing post and that has to be better than not working at all.

Also it is always easier to get a job when you are in a job.
Although you feel you don’t have the experience or knowledge for the job, when it is a entry level post I would imagine the company would have to provide you with a siitable level of support. You can definitely advise your manager about your concerns re: lack of skills in the area.

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