jamesbere Registered User
#16

I'm always hearing voices, must be the work of santa

topper75 Registered User
#17

RiderOnTheStorm said:
The greatest trick the devil ever pulled was convincing people he didnt exist.


Not a trick. He is just not an ego guy.

God, now ...

1 person has thanked this post
One eyed Jack Registered User
#18

Deebles McBeebles said:
That last bit is very interesting as it seems to equate mental health issues with old fairytales like the devil.



While I in no way wish for what I’m about to say to be seen as supporting the nonsense that priest or whoever has come out with, there is a growing practice in psychology of taking an holistic approach to treating patients (clients, if you prefer), and understanding the role and influence that religion has in their lives, rather than attempting to rally against it -

What Role Do Religion and Spirituality Play In Mental Health?


wexie said:
That's just what you'd want to hear, oh those voices you're hearing? That's not schizophrenia at all, it's the devil....



Curiously enough (and again not suggesting for a minute I necessarily agree with it), but -


In the past mental health professionals were taught not to let voice hearers talk about their voices as this was thought to be colluding with the person’s delusions and not helpful. Most often professionals sought to distract the voice hearer from their voices.

Research has shown that many people hear voices, and some cope well with their voices, without psychiatric intervention. It has also been found that many people who hear voices regard them as a positive part of their lives.

Throughout history and even today there are people who hear voices who find their voices inspirational and comforting. Many researchers, practitioners and voice hearers believe it is mistaken to regard voice hearing as part of a psychopathic disease syndrome. Rather, they consider it to be more akin to a variation in human experience – a special faculty or difference that definitely does not need a cure.



Mental Health Ireland

sbsquarepants Registered User
#19

topper75 said:
Not a trick. He is just not an ego guy.

God, now ...


Whiny, needy little bitch and no mistake!

Love me
Honour me
One day a week is all about me
Don't be eyeing up other gods
Make sure you celebrate my birthday
By the way, if you piss me off i'll burn you


Fúck me, you couldn't go out with someone like the twat!

3 people have thanked this post
Deebles McBeebles Registered User
#20

One eyed Jack said:
While I in no way wish for what I’m about to say to be seen as supporting the nonsense that priest or whoever has come out with, there is a growing practice in psychology of taking an holistic approach to treating patients (clients, if you prefer), and understanding the role and influence that religion has in their lives, rather than attempting to rally against it -


Proper, proven, psychological practice, no problem. Standing over the bed telling demons to go away, not so much.


One eyed Jack said:
Curiously enough (and again not suggesting for a minute I necessarily agree with it), but -


In the past mental health professionals were taught not to let voice hearers talk about their voices as this was thought to be colluding with the person’s delusions and not helpful. Most often professionals sought to distract the voice hearer from their voices.

Research has shown that many people hear voices, and some cope well with their voices, without psychiatric intervention. It has also been found that many people who hear voices regard them as a positive part of their lives.

Throughout history and even today there are people who hear voices who find their voices inspirational and comforting. Many researchers, practitioners and voice hearers believe it is mistaken to regard voice hearing as part of a psychopathic disease syndrome. Rather, they consider it to be more akin to a variation in human experience – a special faculty or difference that definitely does not need a cure.


I think you've gone off track a bit, no one is saying there is only one way to treat this and its "X" and certainly I wouldn't pretend to know much about psychology but I do know the nut job who is setting up an exorcism squad needs to make an appointment with a psychologist.

3 people have thanked this post
taxAHcruel Registered User
#21

RiderOnTheStorm said:
The greatest trick the devil ever pulled was convincing people he didnt exist.


Is that why their god has seemingly been doing the same thing then? Copy cat?

pleas advice Registered User
#22

topper75 said:
Not a trick. He is just not an ego guy.

God, now ...


Is that his alter ego?

sbsquarepants Registered User
#23

One


Research has shown that many people hear voices, and some cope well with their voices, without psychiatric intervention. It has also been found that many people who hear voices regard them as a positive part of their lives.



There's a theory that it's a throwback to ancient times when everybody heard these voices and they were accepted as muses or the gods or some such. Sometimes they were helpful, sometimes not, but it was just the human experience at the time.
Only relatively recently (2 or 3 thousand years ago) did we develop the trait of introspection and we came to recognise them as creations of our own mind which silenced the voices for most, but not all. Today we tend to call these people schizophrenics.

Now I'm not sure if I believe it, but it's a very interesting theory, and there is some supporting evidence - there's a good TED talk on it.

1 person has thanked this post
Deebles McBeebles Registered User
#24

A bit more on this, from January this time. It seems to be way more prevalent than I thought.

In his open letter to the Irish bishops, Collins wrote: “...there has been increasing evidence of the malicious activity of the evil one.”
https://www.catholicnewsagency.com/news/irish-priest-asks-for-back-up-as-demand-for-exorcisms-rises-exponentially-21186

nozzferrahhtoo Registered User
#25

Deebles McBeebles said:
Can't believe this is a thing in 2018 but there you go.


It is curious that such talk about the devil is an issue for some people.

After all consider the other stuff these people tend to believe. They think the explanation for our universe was some male father figure who intentionally contrived to create the universe with us in it. They sometimes believe this entity visited us in human form and still does. And that it spiritually visits us through the medium of little crackers.

They think that dropping to their knees and mumbling can actively petition this entity to intervene in the natural workings of said universe and modify it to our benefit. And more.

But they they start talking about the devil and people react with "Well that's just mad stuff that is" attitudes. How is ranting about the devil any more unsubstantiated nonsense than their core claim there is a god in the first place?

I can not wrap my head around the attitude I have seen from some people that belief in a god is perfectly normal and ok, but the moment you start talking about belief in the devil or the actions of the devil you are some how going into nutjob territory.

There are no arguments, evidence, data or reasonings on offer to suggest that ANY of these entities exist. The idea there is a god is an unsubstantiated fantasy some people cling to and cherish and it is no more nutty than anything this bishop just came out with.

2 people have thanked this post
Deebles McBeebles Registered User
#26

No disagreement here but I wouldn't like to criticise people of faith who are taking the meat and leaving the bones, as it were.

This guy is on a different level from what I've seen of him. In particular the part about people who couldn't be counselled because the devil was in them or some such nonsense. That's not the granny going to mass every morning and living life in the best way she can because she has a belief, that's dangerous.

Want to share your thoughts?

Login here to discuss!