EdgeCase Registered User
#76

I must buy a camping gaz stove and get the chimneys cleaned. It’s probably 15 years since I’ve lit a fire.

I was thinking one of the simplest things would be to wire the power supply to the central heating system so that it can be easily connected to small generator.

The boiler, pumps and control system are all connected to a 3amp switched spur. It would be very easy to just add an EN 60309 wall inlet socket on feeding the heating system and a EN 60309 outlet socket after the switched spur.

In normal use you’d just leave a short cable with plug on one end and socket on the other connected between them as a patch cord.

If the power failed, you could very safely unplug the mains and connect a small generator.

That way you’d have central heating during any power cut with just minor intervention.
The boiler, pumps and controls only use maybe 150-200 watts or so.

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Graces7 Registered User
#77

This time last year I had no ESB due to council..... er.....mistakes, no fitted gas cooker, a solid fuel stove you could not cook on unless you put the pan inside.. The camping stove saved the day but at E5 a cartridge was pricey.

I use the gas cooker now all the time; the cylinder is as by law outside. And all properly fitted and a co2 monitor shines its green eye . Electricity is far dearer than gas and I pay for the cylinders in advance so easier to budget. Boil water atop the gas too. The solid fuel heats the water tank too.

And with being so island-isolate and my declining health I stay well stocked for all I need. A little low on bread as this protracted gale was unexpected, but I can make stove top bannocks easily enough. I have enough dry goods in for about 2- 3 months... and a fine potato harvest. Opened dry milk today and that is fine too..Cat and dog food...

I was not expecting this so early but Ali was a great test...

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Dickerty Registered User
#78

limnam said:
Nice bottle of whiskey


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ednwireland Moderator
#79

camping stove in shed, solid fuel range in kitchen will do for sticking a stew on and does hot water, gas cooker, various battery LED lights if needed.
several chainsaws for hacking out of the drive and down the road with full PPE
all from having a really dodgy electricity supply in the late 90's when house was bought !

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goat2 Registered User
#80

Graces7 said:
This time last year I had no ESB due to council..... er.....mistakes, no fitted gas cooker, a solid fuel stove you could not cook on unless you put the pan inside.. The camping stove saved the day but at E5 a cartridge was pricey.

I use the gas cooker now all the time; the cylinder is as by law outside. And all properly fitted and a co2 monitor shines its green eye . Electricity is far dearer than gas and I pay for the cylinders in advance so easier to budget. Boil water atop the gas too. The solid fuel heats the water tank too.

And with being so island-isolate and my declining health I stay well stocked for all I need. A little low on bread as this protracted gale was unexpected, but I can make stove top bannocks easily enough. I have enough dry goods in for about 2- 3 months... and a fine potato harvest. Opened dry milk today and that is fine too..Cat and dog food...

I was not expecting this so early but Ali was a great test...


This is scary for us on the west coast, no matter how careful we are, things always happen in high winds, I understand where you come from with the gas, it is a matter of importance to you, Gas is great to have, but I am not far from town, a couple miles, and once the wind is down it is easy to get things right again, I am just hoping my home is not structurally damaged as it was a couple yrs ago, the roof half gone

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Graces7 Registered User
#81

goat2 said:
This is scary for us on the west coast, no matter how careful we are, things always happen in high winds, I understand where you come from with the gas, it is a matter of importance to you, Gas is great to have, but I am not far from town, a couple miles, and once the wind is down it is easy to get things right again, I am just hoping my home is not structurally damaged as it was a couple yrs ago, the roof half gone


Just came on to say.. getting brief power cuts already. Our power lines now run under the ocean and cuts are rare so are the depths already so disturbed?

We usually get power cuts only if the mainland does; we were off only 2 hours in Ali, ESB engineers are awesome, amazing. Heroes..

I could not afford to cook electric... was once in an all-electric house and never again. since then always at least a gas hob. My preference. More flexible too. Very much cheaper; an E30 bottle lasts around 4 months. Never an issue with a leak etc.

Yes I remember your roof going. Hoping it stays put this time..

The noise in this dwelling is loud. It is a demountable dwelling, a sealed aluminium unit. Rain hammers .. well concreted into the ground and they raised the ground so it cannot flood. Issues with sideways deluges creeping under the door this week...

Apart from letting cats and dog out, staying firmly put today.

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Calibos Registered User
#82

I didn't take any lessons from the Beast because I took lessons from 2010 for the Beast. ie. Bought enough Coal and Logs for the fire to last 2 weeks should the electric go and the knockon effect on the Gas CH. Got a Calor gas cylinder for the Superser should it be needed and bought enough ingredients for 10 days of our normal meals. We were eating like kings while people scrambled around for milk and bread. The local fuel merchant was sceptical when I told him about the incoming Beast but must have listened because when I went for a top up after the Beast he thanked me for letting him know as he ordered in more stock before the beast arrived and sold it all and could have sold even more. Similarly, many customers thanked me for persuading them to get to the main shops before the Beast arrived. I had explained to them that they should go, not because it would be impossible to get to the shops during the Beast but because when Met Eireann finally started warning the Public about the Beast, there would be panic buying and the shelves would be empty and unlikely to be restocked during the Beast so a trip to the shops during the Beast would be fruitless.....which is exactly what happened.

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goat2 Registered User
#83

Graces7 said:
Just came on to say.. getting brief power cuts already. Our power lines now run under the ocean and cuts are rare so are the depths already so disturbed?

We usually get power cuts only if the mainland does; we were off only 2 hours in Ali, ESB engineers are awesome, amazing. Heroes..

I could not afford to cook electric... was once in an all-electric house and never again. since then always at least a gas hob. My preference. More flexible too. Very much cheaper; an E30 bottle lasts around 4 months. Never an issue with a leak etc.

Yes I remember your roof going. Hoping it stays put this time..

The noise in this dwelling is loud. It is a demountable dwelling, a sealed aluminium unit. Rain hammers .. well concreted into the ground and they raised the ground so it cannot flood. Issues with sideways deluges creeping under the door this week...

Apart from letting cats and dog out, staying firmly put today.


I understand you, stay safe, clock is falling here at the moment

jspuds Registered User
#84

EdgeCase said:
I must buy a camping gaz stove and get the chimneys cleaned. It’s probably 15 years since I’ve lit a fire.

I was thinking one of the simplest things would be to wire the power supply to the central heating system so that it can be easily connected to small generator.

The boiler, pumps and control system are all connected to a 3amp switched spur. It would be very easy to just add an EN 60309 wall inlet socket on feeding the heating system and a EN 60309 outlet socket after the switched spur.

In normal use you’d just leave a short cable with plug on one end and socket on the other connected between them as a patch cord.

If the power failed, you could very safely unplug the mains and connect a small generator.

That way you’d have central heating during any power cut with just minor intervention.
The boiler, pumps and controls only use maybe 150-200 watts or so.


Thanks, you put an idea in my head to connect up the stove pump to a UPS so in the event of a power loss can still heat the house.
I'm currently looking into the costs to install and run

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starlit Registered User
#85

Having enough warm clothes to get me through a harsh winter! Can see another beast from the east again before year is out or early next year if we continue to get storms. Yet was said after 7 years that jet stream change direction to have milder winters and warmer summers as our summers haven't been great up till this years heatwave.

Roen Registered User
#86

Was well prepared this year, or so I thought.

Ran the genny for 30 mins the evening before the major snows came as part of it's routine check, started first pull as usual.

A day later and the electric went. Took me two hours to get it started. Had to leave the choke full on. As soon as I tried to run it at full revs it died. So in the space of 24 hours the carburettor reached a point where it was working fine to being gummed up and needing maintenance.

I was able to run the boiler and heat the house though even with it limping.

Couldn't run kitchen appliances so dug the food into a snow cave I made in the garden. It had drifted to 1.6m in places so it was quite easy. Food easily kept for the 5 days we were without leccy.

Bigger issue was the water going. Was off for almost three days, with an ill 12 month old baby in the house it wasn't easy, but we had it handier than some people nearby, army had to get them out so the ambulance could get them away.

On the plus side the over wintering kale and garlic loved the snow and I had a bumped crop later on!

So in terms of what I've done differently this year:

Since the repair I've run it under load for an hour at least a month. Previously I was just running it for 30 mins per month under no load. The petrol gets changed out every three months (used in ride on) and topped up with fresh stuff.
I also built a trolley (mars rover 1) with oversized inflatable wheels to get the genny over gravel and rougher ground more easily. It was an awful pain hauling 60Kgs through waist deep snow

I now have secure storage for 50L of petrol for the genny but don't keep that much on hand. Usually only ~15L in it and 5 nearby. Don't like having petrol lying about, no matter how good the storage is. Earlier this year I only had the 15L in it and 5 in the ride on I siphoned out.
I just didn't expect that things would get as bad as they would, I'm in the sunniest part of the sunny South East after all!

So if the electric goes again I'll be having heat, light and fridges and TV going.

In terms of solid fuel, I have 1.6 tonnes of coal and smokeless with some blocks to keep me going for a year or two Stove is a real miser on fuel and reddens the living room. The kerosene for the boiler is not allowed to go below 500L in winter so that'll last months too.

Food I can get on the week but won't go hungry even if I can't get to the shops.

Clothing wise I was always into mountaineering, rock, ice climbing so am good down to at least -20 sleeping out. Not even vaguely worried with a roof over my head on that front. So no change needed there. When I was single and had no kid I would have loved those conditions.

Have 400L of water in butts that I can purify and use should the water go again. Have a Millbank bag to pre filter it before boiling it too. Butts are fairly well sealed but the odd leaf can make it's way in.

Oh and there's always the BBQ!

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dsmythy Registered User
#87

I might want to start considering this with MT's small mention of a below average temperature winter. I'd trust his musings over anyone elses.

I've a feeling if there was to be a very cold spell this winter, with last winter's events very fresh in the memory, there might be bigger pressure on everything in the lead up to the event.

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Lucreto Registered User
#88

Reading MT's musings for this Winter I might get the majority of the Christmas shopping done early. If it's like 2010 and there is snow on the run up to Christmas it will cause a lot of last minute panic buying.

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adocholiday Registered User
#89

This thread makes for great reading. We've just purchased a house outside Rathdrum in Wicklow and if a harsh winter hits it will be a big change from the Dublin apartment we're in now, a 5 min walk from any shop you might need and never had any water/electric/heat issues in the time we've been here.

Will be taking a lot of things from the previous posts. The only thing I had considered up to now was possibly buying an old 4 wheel drive so we'd be able to get around in bad weather if necessary, but seems there's a lot more we could be doing! Thanks all.

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