peasant Moderator
#1

That small capacity turbo petrol engine that the manufacturers suggest is the perfect replacement for your diesel because it's so efficient and clean...well it mightn't be for all that long.
A lot of diesel drivers who discovered issues over time with DPF, EGR, ADBLUE and turbos...they might be in for a host of similar surprises down the road with their new, efficient petrol engine

20 mins worth watching:

Toyotafanboi Moderator
#2

There's 20 minutes I'm not getting back.

Carbon build up on the back of the intake valves, the end.

6 people have thanked this post
peasant Moderator
#3

Well, I found it interesting...but then again, I did my first 100.000 km on cars that had carburetors and chokes

1 person has thanked this post
colm_mcm Registered User
#4

Isn’t your new Ignis direct injection?

peasant Moderator
#5

colm_mcm said:
Isn’t your new Ignis direct injection?


nope, that's port injection (with two injectors per cylinder, hence the dualjet moniker)

mikeecho Registered User
#6

So... I've never bought a brand new car.

So... I'll do what I usually do.. wait a few years and read the long term reviews.

3 people have thanked this post
C4Kid Registered User
#7

Currently have 184,000 Miles on my 1.6 Directly injected petrol VW and it's still going strong. Timing chain had to be replaced at 128,000 - no problems other then that

dr.fuzzenstein Registered User
#8

mikeecho said:
So... I've never bought a brand new car.

So... I'll do what I usually do.. wait a few years and read the long term reviews.


Be glad someone else does.

Renegade Mechanic Registered User
#9

Toyotafanboi said:
There's 20 minutes I'm not getting back.

Carbon build up on the back of the intake valves, the end.


I remember asking if the lack of petrol injectors would lead to that problem when we were learning about them in Fas back in 09 I think, given that they wouldn't have quite the mass air flow that diesels had and got a "huh..." back from the teacher. I couldn't tell you now if they've fixed it but I know what I'd do to fix it. Small injector in the plenum chamber ahead of the four manifold pipes. Would be the only way to keep the carbon at bay tbh.

Neilw Registered User
#10

There are pre injectors in a lot of cars to keep the valves clean and then direct injection for efficiency.

peasant Moderator
#11

And then there would be the issue of particulates.
Direct injection petrol engines emit a lot more particulates than diesels with dpf, which means most direct injection petrol engines will have to fitted with particulate filters (if they aren't already) if they are to meet the current emission regulations (grey horizontal line in the graphic)

This graphic shows particulate measurement from the German ADAC in their Eco-Test from March 2017

The yellow horizontal line ist the particular emissions limit as of then, the lower grey line the limit as of Sept 2017 (for new vehicles)

The different colours of the individual results indicate the type of engine
- yellow = direct injection petrol
- orange = port injection petrol
- red = plug in hybrid
- grey = natural gas (as far as I can see only one vehicle, the Skoda that "wins" this test)



bigger picture:
https://data.motor-talk.de/data/galleries/0/447/5154/76363881/partikelausstoss-dis-adac-3718317714257467588.jpg

Cee-Jay-Cee Registered User
#12

My 2010 Mazda 6 2.0i is direct injection. I don’t know is it any more efficient than the normal injection/inlet manifold set up but so far mine has been faultless without any issues.

Want to share your thoughts?

Login here to discuss!