Klonker Registered User
#1

As the thread title suggests, I have a very noisy neighbour. I moved into a brand new ground and first floor duplex and on the second floor directly above is another apartment. The occupants are a young couple with a 2 year old child.

The problem is the child is constantly running around making noise like someone is hammering in nails and it can continue for hours at a time. It may sound like I'm making a big deal out of nothing but it can really be unbearable at times and is really hampering our enjoyment of our new home. There were no problems until they moved in a month ago.

I've already called to their door twice explaining the hassle they are causing us and they say they will try minimise the noise but there has been no real change.

So short story long, what are my options? Can I complain to the management company? I doubt anything would happen if I did. I'm pretty sure it is a social housing home as I can see from PPR site that it was sold for less then all other identical apartments in the development, any point complaining to the council? I also think that the man is not supposed to be living there though I have no proof for this, just a feeling. Would it be bad of me to pass this on to the council? Would it make any difference anyway?

Also all owners were supposed to put down the correct sound minimising underlay for their floors, is there any way to check or enforce this in a neighbours home?

Stanford Registered User
#2

Do you know if the neighbouring house is rented from a Local Authority?

Klonker Registered User
#3

It's not a HAP rented apartment if that's what you mean. I'm fairly sure the council own it and rent/gave it to the current occupants.

Telly Registered User
#4

We have the same issue. Management company said our only option is court like some of our other neighbors as we’ve tried everything and now we’ve hit a brick wall so that’s our next step unfortunately It’s just drama no one wants but the judge will make them sound proof their floors. For now you need to document everything. That’s what we’ve been told.

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Stanford Registered User
#5

I would formally write (Registered Post) to the Local Authority on the assumption that they are ultimately the Landlord and outline my complaint and stating that you have already complained to the Occupier, let them deal with the matter and give them 10 days to respond, cease any interaction with the occupier in the interim to avoid complicating matters

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Sleeper12 Registered User
#6

I wonder is it bad soundproofing that's the real issue. Children make noise. Children run up and down. The child could be autistic or have ADHD. In a modern building this shouldn't be a problem imo

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Stanford Registered User
#7

Sleeper12 said:
I wonder is it bad soundproofing that's the real issue. Children make noise. Children run up and down. The child could be autistic or have ADHD. In a modern building this shouldn't be a problem imo


The reason for the noise is not the OP's problem, he is entitled to "quiet enjoyment" of his home

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Klonker Registered User
#8

Sleeper12 said:
I wonder is it bad soundproofing that's the real issue. Children make noise. Children run up and down. The child could be autistic or have ADHD. In a modern building this shouldn't be a problem imo


In what way shouldn't it be a problem, that I shouldn't be able to hear it or I shouldn't complain about it?

imp1 Registered User
#9

How new is the apartment?

If less than about 2 years it should meet Part E of the building regs for noise, including impact noise, which seems to be the main problem.

Are you an owner occupier?

As part of your completion certificate you should have the results of Part E testing, might be worth looking into?

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Sleeper12 Registered User
#10

Klonker
In what way shouldn't it be a problem, that I shouldn't be able to hear it or I shouldn't complain about it?



Sorry. I meant that in a modern building you shouldn't hear it to the extent that you are. You are quite entitled to complain to the management company

If the soundproofing is bad then it's not the upstairs tenants fault & you should be able to get out of the lease & get a full refund on your deposit

paddyirish23 Registered User
#11

Stanford said:
The reason for the noise is not the OP's problem, he is entitled to "quiet enjoyment" of his home


Surely to god if you buy something with an apartment overhead your going to have some sort of noise and should've had that in mind when buying the place? Maybe the child is autistic, I've 1st hand experience of it and believe me it's not anyone's fault if they're noisy!

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Sleeper12 Registered User
#12

Stanford
The reason for the noise is not the OP's problem, he is entitled to "quiet enjoyment" of his home



The reason for the the noise is very important here. On one side it could be the tenants above at fault or on the other side it could be the building itself at fault. Two different problems handled in two totally different ways.

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riemann Registered User
#13

paddyirish23 said:
Surely to god if you buy something with an apartment overhead your going to have some sort of noise and should've had that in mind when buying the place? Maybe the child is autistic, I've 1st hand experience of it and believe me it's not anyone's fault if they're noisy!


Not quite.

There is an area of expertise called acoustics where noise transfer can be reduced if not eliminated.

In the long run, if you're only renting best case senario is just move. Several quiet evenings will be ruined before any floor upgrade works will commence, and it will require a lot of time on your part to even make that a possibility.

Telly Registered User
#14

riemann said:
Not quite.

There is an area of expertise called acoustics where noise transfer can be reduced if not eliminated.

In the long run, if you're only renting best case senario is just move. Several quiet evenings will be ruined before any floor upgrade works will commence, and it will require a lot of time on your part to even make that a possibility.

What if both are owner occupiers?

Sleeper12 Registered User
#15

Telly
What if both are owner occupiers?



It can go to court. Possible outcome is both parties are ordered to improve soundproofing.

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