HighLine Registered User
#841

arctictree said:
The levels of water in the roundwood reservoirs are generally 3 or 4 months behind the weather. Winter 2017 was very dry and we didnt get enough rain to replenish the reservoirs so they stayed low. It took until Jan 2018 for the levels to be back up to full. I expect the water levels to not drop low until August.


Very good call... levels currently very low. (If you click into the photos of the tweet below, you can see the difference from July to now)

https://twitter.com/IrelandSkycam/status/1036967396412719104

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hinault Registered User
#842

The very low quantity of rainfall since the end of the drought is very noticeable.

The lawn in my front garden and my back garden remains rock hard. Usually during April to September I have to cut both lawns every 2 weeks.
By this time of the year, I would have mowed both lawns about 16 times.

This year I have moved both lawns 4 times since April 2018, due to the lack of grass growth which I put down to, in part, the huge decrease in rainfall amounts

snowstreams Registered User
#843

My grass has been growing like mad since the drought ended.
But we have had a decent amount of rain here in Athenry compared to the south and east.

1 person has thanked this post
SleetAndSnow Registered User
#844

we've cut the grass once in Cork city since the drought 'ended'. The grass is green and its been drizzling but there isn't a need to cut it. Makes it cut two times in total this summer/autumn

3 people have thanked this post
odyboody Registered User
#845

HighLine said:
Very good call... levels currently very low. (If you click into the photos of the tweet below, you can see the difference from July to now)

https://twitter.com/IrelandSkycam/status/1036967396412719104


What I found really interesting is if you click onto the irelandSkycam web site the photos from January 2017 are very similar water levels to now

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sryanbruen Registered User
#846

MJohnston said:
Wow, only 1 station essentially at-average. I'd love to see another column with driest summers on record - was Cork the only record breaker?


Sorry this is taking a long time to answer MJohnston (I'm also working on the replies to other statistical questions that have been asked on here during or after Storm Ali). According to Met Éireann's PDF, Cork Airport was indeed the only record breaker for the #1 spot at least. 2018 fell at least in the top 5 driest at several stations. Mullingar is one example (just abouts beating 1983). Monthly records for Mullingar go back to 1950.



Data comes from Met Éireann.

5 people have thanked this post
Jpmarn Registered User
#847

Still suffering the after affects of the drought that was prevalent over the summer. Made 75 bales in a particular field in the first cut in June. Just did the second cut a month late and only made 39 bales of silage. In a good year I would get about 60 bales in late August and I would have in calf heifers in the field by now. In another field I got a good crop of silage in early June. It got grazed in late July in the height of grass shortages. It is still not fit to cut yet for silage yet. What will happen do this field will depend on the performance of the rest of the farm. Grass growth is highly variable from time to time and from the field to field. Generally growth has been fairly good in the last week. If growth keeps up for the next few weeks it would be quite likely the field would be cut. If not it would be grazed then and would be a help in delaying the start of winter foddering which is a scarce resource this year.

4 people have thanked this post
ZX7R Registered User
#848

Got out and about on the motorcycle today and was shocked to see how many small streams are still bone dry.
A lot of famers and wildlife going to suffer if we end up with a dryer and colder than average winter

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