oceanclub Registered User
#1

http://www.dlrcoco.ie/en/cemeteries/burial-records

According to this page, they tendered for an online search system in the past; anyone know what the current status of this is?

P.

pedroeibar1 Registered User
#2

Is there not a record already online somewhere? I recall seeing a list of various burials in an Excel format?

pinkypinky Moderator
#3

Yes IGP has some - can't find the link for some reason.

Also on microfilm in Pearse St.

tabbey Registered User
#4

pinkypinky said:


Also on microfilm in Pearse St.


And in GSI.

BowWow Registered User
#5

Is there anywhere online to get records from Mount Jerome?

Thanks....

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oceanclub Registered User
#6

pinkypinky said:
Yes IGP has some - can't find the link for some reason.


Would this be it?

http://www.igp-web.com/IGPArchives/ire/dublin/photos/tombstones/deansgrange-ndx.htm

P.

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shanew Registered User
#7

BowWow said:
Is there anywhere online to get records from Mount Jerome?

Thanks....


just the IGP headstone transcripts - no official Mount Jerome burial records online. Pearse Street Library have microfilms.

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BowWow Registered User
#8

oceanclub said:
http://www.dlrcoco.ie/en/cemeteries/burial-records

According to this page, they tendered for an online search system in the past; anyone know what the current status of this is?

P.


These now online - https://discovereverafter.com/graveyards/179

Very useful!.

More information on Claire Santry's Irish Genealogy News

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pinkypinky Moderator
#9

Yes, I've already found some "new" ancestors using it in conjunction with the death records. Delighted.

paumurp Registered User
#10

BowWow said:
These now online - https://discovereverafter.com/graveyards/179

Very useful!.

More information on Claire Santry's Irish Genealogy News



They're very useful. Images of the interment books rather than just a list of burials. Name, age, occupation, and address. The address is especially useful.

Also you can see anyone else that is buried in the same plot.

On that, I've a question that someone might be able to help with.
I've found that in some plots there are people buried there that appear to have no obvious link with with the family. For example, 4 family members in a plot all buried between 1912 and 1922, along with someone buried in 1891, and a child from Waterford buried in 1967

I've another husband and wife, sharing a plot with 2 men with no apparent link, buried at different times previous to them.

Are they likely to be unidentified relatives, or were plots resold?

tabbey Registered User
#11

paumurp said:



Are they likely to be unidentified relatives, or were plots resold?


Glasnevin made graves available to others after five years option to purchase, presumably Deansgrange must have some similar mechanism.

Nevertheless you have to allow for the possibility of some connection to your family, even if it is only a relative of a friend.

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tabbey Registered User
#12

There is a lot of information in these registers, the depth left after each interment and the interment fee.

I was shocked at how the latter had escalated from £60 in 1981 when my father died, to £100 when my mother died in 1987 and E685 in 2007 when we buried our stillborn child. In this case, we got it for little more than half price E390, because they only needed to open up a small amount of the grave, as the baby's coffin was little bigger than a shoe box. Nevertheless, E685 for a normal interment seemed extortionate.

At times of bereavement we pay these fees without question, like robots, but it is something else to see them in the cold light of day.

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pinkypinky Moderator
#13

Graves were definitely resold in Deansgrange. My 2x greatgrandfather is in a grave and 65 years later one other person, unrelated is added.

Glasnevin had quite elaborate rules about when a grave could be resold.

@Tabbey: condolences - that's very sad, and you're right about the price we pay for these things when numb with grief. I tried to debate the cost when my father died (with family) and felt it was a waste to spend money on things that would be cremated, but didn't get very far!

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oceanclub Registered User
#14

So I used it to find my great-great-grandfather (https://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Walsh-5277 death details, at least I think it's him!

Searching, I found a William Walsh, coal porter (job references in his children's marriage certs), who died aged 80 in on October 29th, 1891 in Clarence St, Kingston (which is where a daughter was born).

However, searching the irishgenealogy.ie, there is a matching William Welsh - same date and street, a labourer, with a wife's name who matches my great-great-grandmother BUT his age is 55 in this. (https://civilrecords.irishgenealogy.ie/churchrecords/details-civil/f638643716528

I'm assuming it must be him and that someone was just really careless about ages. (Since he was married in 1851, I'm assuming he was more than 55 at least.)

P.

pedroeibar1 Registered User
#15

oceanclub said:
So I used it to find my great-great-grandfather (https://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Walsh-5277 death details, at least I think it's him!

Searching, I found a William Walsh, coal porter (job references in his children's marriage certs), who died aged 80 in on October 29th, 1891 in Clarence St, Kingston (which is where a daughter was born).

However, searching the irishgenealogy.ie, there is a matching William Welsh - same date and street, a labourer, with a wife's name who matches my great-great-grandmother BUT his age is 55 in this. (https://civilrecords.irishgenealogy.ie/churchrecords/details-civil/f638643716528

I'm assuming it must be him and that someone was just really careless about ages. (Since he was married in 1851, I'm assuming he was more than 55 at least.)

P.

I have not been following/read this thread in detail, but on the last post yes, people were careless about ages. Sometimes a 25 year difference might mean a son of the same forename rather than the father. However, there is a clue in ‘senile decay’ being given as cause of death as 55 is too young for ‘old age’ and probably is an error.

The address / coal porter occupation make perfect sense as Clarence Street overlooks the Coal Harbour in Dun Laoghaire and what is now a business park and apartment complex originally was a coal yard (Wallace’s, then Tedcastles). Coal porters were not long-lived, it was a tough job and involved working tough conditions. I’ve seen the term ‘coal porter’ used for the person who kept the fires going in buildings (e.g. hotels) and the man who worked carrying coal /other goods from a ship was described as a ‘quay labourer’ – a description frequently used for a casual ‘docker’.
(Apologies for topic drift)

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