jenna558 Registered User
#16

magicbastarder said:
probably a little OT, but i've often wondered what the legal position is on a road where cars queue two abreast, but there are no road markings indicating that there are two lanes. i often see it on griffith avenue, and east wall road near the lidl. is there a scenario where a drive could be found at fault legally because they took a road position which was not explicitly allowed by road markings?
speaking with my cyclist hat on, it can be a little irritating when motorists queue this way and there's no room left for other road users.


To be honest, this had occurred to me as well recently. Because one of the experiences I had was on the North Circular Road, where there is also one large lane with no markings, that people nearly always turn into two. I usually try to stay left (with enough space for a cyclist!) so people going right can take the right half of that lane to turn right. However, there is one junction where I go in the right half of the lane, as there is a left turn with a flashing amber light, and I don't want to be in the way of people who are turning left and don't have a red light while I do. I do try to be considerate to all in as far as things like that occur to me.
I don't have an answer for you though, but I had wondered as it does also confuse the issue of who goes first when both are going straight when the light goes green.

brokenarms Registered User
#17

As we drive on left in this country, any road user trying to enter a single lane from the right should give way to those in the left.
Unless otherwise indicated by signage or road markings.

Fleet street is and example of this when driving onto Townsend street in town. No markings.

Wishbone Ash Registered User
#18

brokenarms said:
As we drive on left in this country, any road user trying to enter a single lane from the right should give way to those in the left.
Unless otherwise indicated by signage or road markings.

Fleet street is and example of this when driving onto Townsend street in town. No markings.


Where there are no road marking/signage, the golden rule has always been to give way to vehicles on one's right.

TheChizler Registered User
#19

Wishbone Ash said:


Where there are no road marking/signage, the golden rule has always been to give way to vehicles on one's right.

That's at a junction though surely?

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Wishbone Ash Registered User
#20

TheChizler said:
That's at a junction though surely?
Yes, but the same principle would apply (where there is no signage). It's effectively a junction with two roads of equal importance so give way to drivers on the right.

brokenarms Registered User
#21

Wishbone Ash said:


Where there are no road marking/signage, the golden rule has always been to give way to vehicles on one's right.


Can you provide any evidence of this rule?

I dont think anyone has right of way as such, but the the left lane does have priority . In my mind anyway.

Its a hard one to find any info on. What is clear is one must always proceed with cation.

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seamus Dental Plan!
#22

At a base level if there are two lanes, then the lane on the right is the overtaking lane, the lane on the left is the "driving" lane. Therefore if they are merging, it should be assumed that it is the overtaking lane which is merging into the driving lane, and anyone in the overtaking lane should complete their overtake safely or merge behind. That is, unless the road markings indicate otherwise.

However, in the event that you have two lanes of queued traffic, anyone in the driving lane should be considerate of those in the overtaking lane and allow space to merge. This is in much the same way at motorway slips that a vehicle which deliberately or carelessly blocks other cars from merging on can be prosecuted for driving without due care.

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beauf Registered User
#23

If was a new driver I'd just let them past and stay in your own lane.
The only thing that's important is not to hit anything.
Even if that means slowing down and even stopping to let the idiots past.

An experienced driver might move over slightly and command the lane(s) until the road widened. But I wouldn't advice a new driver doing that.

Driving very aggressive and bullying is very common these days. They should really teach new drivers and even experience drivers good ways/techniques of dealing with it, even as far as the mental attitude to not to take it personally and just ignore it.

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