Sesshoumaru Registered User
#1

Not sure if this is the right place for this, but worth a read if you're in the market for a new CPU:

https://www.theregister.co.uk/2018/01/02/intel_cpu_design_flaw/

I've read a few sites now and it's not clear what the gaming / performance impact will be. But most sites seem to agree there will be a performance impact. Just not sure how much of an impact until Microsoft release security workarounds for this Intel CPU flaw.

Cuddlesworth Registered User
#2

Sesshoumaru said:
Not sure if this is the right place for this, but worth a read if you're in the market for a new CPU:

https://www.theregister.co.uk/2018/01/02/intel_cpu_design_flaw/

I've read a few sites now and it's not clear what the gaming / performance impact will be. But most sites seem to agree there will be a performance impact. Just not sure how much of an impact until Microsoft release security workarounds for this Intel CPU flaw.


So far it looks like,

Could be a large performance hit to games. Not clear yet on how reliant games are on syscalls.

Performance hit scales down over generations, EG Haswell and onwards are hit less, expected single digits.

Amd are not effected.

It can't be fixed, only worked around. Which means any performance hit is here to stay.

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Xenoronin Registered User
#3

From a gaming point of view, looks like the patch will have negligible impact. Only Linux results out so far, but that's a pretty decent indicator. Day to day you probably won't see much difference. The main impact will be in the server space. Since this doesn't affect AMD, this might even tip some scales in their direction.

Sesshoumaru Registered User
#4

Xenoronin said:
From a gaming point of view, looks like the patch will have negligible impact. Only Linux results out so far, but that's a pretty decent indicator. Day to day you probably won't see much difference. The main impact will be in the server space. Since this doesn't affect AMD, this might even tip some scales in their direction.


Once Windows is patched I'm thinking there will be a lot of bench marking going on. But it's hard to say yet. I think it would depend on whether the game or application in question is more CPU dependent or GPU dependent. If you're playing a game now and the CPU is near maximum, it's possible your frame rates will drop. But who knows?

I work in IT and have been contacting hypervisor and server vendors we use. They've replied to say they are under embargo, so nothing to say yet on performance. Next few days will be enlightening.

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-l-Z3k3-l- Registered User
#5

Unfortunately everyone is under the Embargo, but from all the sources I've been checking, your typical home user will see negligible impact including gamers (still wouldn't you be pretty annoyed if you shelled out for a nice new 8700K system to find out you'll get a performance penalty)
However this will have a huge impact on Cloud providers and datacenters

There are a few benchmarks out there so far showing % hits on diff CPUs (8700K v 6800K etc)

Thing is, most of it is speculation at the moment, so until the embargo is lifted we won't truly know how much of a colossal **** up this is by Intel

Maybe AMD could capitalize on this

L Registered User
#6

What's interesting is Intel's CEO recently sold all the stock he held bar his minimum required under their corporate bylaws.

Not a great vote of confidence that they're going to remain in a strong place anyhow - and then a month later this flaw becomes public knowledge.

3 people have thanked this post
deceit Registered User
#7

Would be completely illegal if the ceo knew about this before sold the stock

1 person has thanked this post
wotzgoingon Registered User
#8

I read on twitter that they are deliberately hampering AMD CPU's also even though they do not have a flaw. How true that is I don't know but I would not put it past Intel to pay off the likes of MS to do that.

ED E Registered User
#9

If AMD have the balls...

Metric Tensor Registered User
#10

Must do a benchmark in the next day or two!

Can anyone in the know give an idea of what type of programs would make most use of this sort of switching to the kernel syscall type activity?

superg Registered User
#11

Intel says its not just their stuff affected

Recent reports that these exploits are caused by a “bug” or a “flaw” and are unique to Intel products are incorrect. Based on the analysis to date, many types of computing devices — with many different vendors’ processors and operating systems — are susceptible to these exploits.


https://newsroom.intel.com/news/intel-responds-to-security-research-findings/

iLikeWaffles Registered User
#12

Wonder how much less bitcoin mining can't be done with that "Vulnerability"

Canis Lupus Registered User
#13

iLikeWaffles said:
Wonder how much less bitcoin mining can't be done with that "Vulnerability"


I thought mining was mainly done on GPUs?

1 person has thanked this post
ED E Registered User
#14

It is.

yoshiktk Registered User
#15

So NSA will have to use another backdoor?

8 people have thanked this post

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