scaryfairy Registered User
#1

I have been following the near misses thread recently and with my own daily hectic commute started to wonder whether it is all worth it... definitely so according to a new paper:

http://www.bbc.com/news/health-39641122


Hopefully our city planners also read the bmj...

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tomasrojo Registered User
#2

I posted a few bits about it in the Jan and Klodi thread, starting here.

jive Registered User
#3

Exercise in cutting risk of disease shocker

In all seriousness though definitely the best way to travel to work if possible, clear head and less stress than the car

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tomasrojo Registered User
#4

jive said:
Exercise in cutting risk of disease shocker

In all seriousness though definitely the best way to travel to work if possible, clear head and less stress than the car


It's very striking how much lower the incidences of cancer and cardiovascular disease are, as well as the mortality rates.


https://twitter.com/ianwalker/status/854986518905180160

I suppose there may be some confounding, in that people who decide to cycle are unlikely to be people with underlying health problems, but it's a BIG difference between people who commute by bike and people who use non-active modes. Even walking does nowhere near as well.

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jive Registered User
#5

tomasrojo said:

I suppose there may be some confounding, in that people who decide to cycle are unlikely to be people with underlying health problems, but it's a BIG difference between people who commute by bike and people who use non-active modes. Even walking does nowhere near as well.


Yeah it's the same with all these types of studies re exercise and nutrition, you can't get away from the confounding factors but they are what they are. The numbers are still great.

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D!armu!d Registered User
#6

scaryfairy said:
Hopefully our city planners also read the bmj...


Hopefully the helmet & hi-vis brigade will too, and then take note of what happened in the other country that tried out their notion!
http://ipa.org.au/publications/2019/australia%27s-helmet-law-disaster

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tomasrojo Registered User
#7

Totally agree. The differences are so big that confounding can't explain very much of it.

tomasrojo Registered User
#8

D!armu!d said:
Hopefully the helmet & hi-vis brigade will too, and then take note of what happened in the other country that tried out their notion!
http://ipa.org.au/publications/2019/australia%27s-helmet-law-disaster


That's just it. The balance of evidence is that habitual cycling is extremely good for you. Like, as good for you as giving up smoking (should you do it in the first place!). The balance of evidence is that cycling isn't all that dangerous and that attempts to make people take up certain safety strategies drop the number of people cycling, and have negligible effect on collision rates and outcomes.

But people just can't believe it.

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Annie get your Run Registered User
#9

tomasrojo said:
But people just can't believe it.


Or don't want to!

I was just thinking the other day as I whizzed past a long line of cars in the PP, how many of those people were going to drive to a gym to do their workout when they could just get on a bike, get home quicker and exercise done for the day

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tomasrojo Registered User
#10

Someone on Twitter tells me that they did control for comorbidities (underlying health problems). Think I'll give it a read later.

slideshow bob Registered User
#11

Direct link to the paper here:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.j1456

Article currently on open access.

Editorial comment in BMJ here compares with Copenhagen experience:
https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.j1740

This has resulted in cycling rates increasing by 30% in Copenhagen over the past two decades. Most other larger cities around the world and in the UK have experienced decreases in cycling rates over the same period. Cycling related traffic incidents in Copenhagen have decreased by roughly two thirds, probably because the new infrastructure has improved safety. Around 40% of all commuter trips in Copenhagen are now by bike. It will take decades to change commuter culture in the UK, but it is possible, and changes in commuter behaviour can occur quickly when active travel is seen as both safe and convenient.

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Lusk_Doyle Registered User
#12

Annie get your Run said:
Or don't want to!

I was just thinking the other day as I whizzed past a long line of cars in the PP, how many of those people were going to drive to a gym to do their workout when they could just get on a bike, get home quicker and exercise done for the day


Probably very few in reality.

DanDublin1982 Registered User
#13

My cycles to and from work are the best parts of my day. Its the bit in between I'm not so keen on.

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seamus Dental Plan!
#14

tomasrojo said:
But people just can't believe it.
I did actually put the link up on facebook and one of the first responses was, "That's all well and good, but if you haven't cycled in years, getting on a bike and going into the city is really dangerous!"

Sometimes people are genuinely concerned. But I'm thinking that in the majority of cases it's just making excuses for not getting off your hole.

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rollingscone Registered User
#15

tomasrojo said:
Someone on Twitter tells me that they did control for comorbidities (underlying health problems). Think I'll give it a read later.


I came across some alternative methodological criticisms on Twitter:

https://twitter.com/Flaminghobo1/status/854975752797908992?s=09

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