bluezulu49 Registered User
#496

leck said:
For those who either tested with MyHeritage or uploaded there, are the matches found on MyHeritage consistent with the matches seen on GEDmatch (in the cases where people have kits in both places)? I belong to a GEDmatch group and I'm always slightly dubious when people post about their matches on MyHeritage.


I tested with MyHeritage and uploaded the results to Gedmatch and FTdna. My closest match in each of the three is the same individual.
Results as follows
Total cM, Total Segments, Longest Segment
MyHeritage 100.9, 7, 25.6
FTDna 140, ?, 25
Gedmatch 99.7, 5, 30.4

The Gedmatch longest segment seems anomalous but I suspect the differences in total cM may be due to different minimum segment sizes (7 cM in the case of Gedmatch).

The number of my matches in MyHeritage jumped exponentially over the weekend and interestingly, one person who was previously a match is now noted as being unrelated.
I find that navigating the matches in MyHeritage is difficult due to the low number of matches per page, much easier to look at the FTDna and Gedmatch lists.

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tonycascarino Registered User
#497

Just curious, but in relation to the DNA test by Ancestry, how far back in years does it realistically detect your ethnicity from?

pinkypinky Moderator
#498

The dawn of time....the ethnicity is all just a bit of fun. It shouldn't be taken seriously.

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whatswhat Registered User
#499

I got the Ancestry DNA kit for Christmas just gone. Having been researching my family tree for a good while on and off, I didn't think there would be many surprises for me as I've traced my Fathers line back to 1600s [all English] and I knew my Mother was from Irish roots only down her paternal line but she is English too, as indeed am I but have lived the past 10 years here in Ireland.
When the results came back 59% Irish, 35% English, 3% Scandinavian and 1% Native American Indian???? I was blown away. It gave me 156 5th/6th cousins [who the majority it seems all live in America] but like someone mentioned earlier in this thread, most of them have no trees to compare, or indeed don't bother to reply to messages sent to find a connection? This seems a shame really.

Needless to say the results have given me more questions to answer now than I ever had before but it's so fascinating!!

Today, I stumbled upon this thread by accident but so glad I did!!
There are some really really helpful folk on here, giving solid help and advice. I had no idea about Gedcom but getting straight on it now and some of the links posted to other sites I knew nothing of, are fantastic, you're all a helpful bunch :]
Massive Thanks.

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dubhthach Registered User
#500

What should be remember is that the 'Irish' category in AncestryDNA is really 'Irish, Scottish and Welsh' it appears to be a component that just happens to be modal in modern Irish populations but probably reflects wider insular connections. I would also say that any results under 3% are subject to 'calculator effect'. Basically the calculator will try and find best match.

I should point out though that all modern Europeans share a deep ancestral connection to Native Americans anyways, as one of the 'ancestral' population components to modern Europeans is 'Ancient North Eurasian' -- an extinct 'meta-population' that contributed to both modern Europeans and modern Native Americans (in case of Native Americans they are a mix of a East Asian like population and ANE)

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tedheavenly Registered User
#501

Sorry for the delay, never got any notification about a response to my comment. Here's the link worth reading. A quick Google search describes other similar methods of doing the same thing; http://www.geneticgenealogist.net/2017/08/updated-method-to-get-ydna-haplogroup.html

spurious Category Moderator
#502

I've rooted out a few 'twice removed' cousins through the DNA. It tells us there is a link and we just have to keep looking.

One we confirmed (or got on the right track to confirming) by something as simple as my pointing out we have a lot of Sarah/Sadie girls in the various threads of the family. Sure enough, the woman I was emailing remembered her Granny mentioning a sister with that name and we knew we were on the right track.

The DNA's great but it doesn't replace the footwork.

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DamoRed Registered User
#503

Given the concerns arising from recent revelations about my paternal grandparents and their children, it seems almost certain the only way to confirm one way or another is by DNA testing. However, as I'm reading the recent pages, I'm seeing terms like 'Y-testing' 'Haplogroup' and I've no idea what any of them mean and subsequently what type of test tells what, or what type of test is best to do.

For those not familiar, it was said by my cousin, that my paternal grandparents 'raised/adopted' 4 girls, but, that 'as far as he knew' my father and his brother were their natural children. It'd be more comforting to know for certain beyond simple misunderstandings.

Is there any site I can go to where these and other terms are explained and a recommendation for what test I take? From the simple background given above, it would appear what I need, is a test that determines whether I follow the paternal familial line. With that in mind, what kind of test do I need to do?

pjproby Registered User
#504

80-year mystery of blackberry bush baby is solved using DNA
http://dailym.ai/2GGhYT6

Story from the Daily Mail today about DNA testing.

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pinkypinky Moderator
#505

DamoRed - you can start with our very own sticky on DNA!

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Ipso Registered User
#506

DamoRed said:
Given the concerns arising from recent revelations about my paternal grandparents and their children, it seems almost certain the only way to confirm one way or another is by DNA testing. However, as I'm reading the recent pages, I'm seeing terms like 'Y-testing' 'Haplogroup' and I've no idea what any of them mean and subsequently what type of test tells what, or what type of test is best to do.

For those not familiar, it was said by my cousin, that my paternal grandparents 'raised/adopted' 4 girls, but, that 'as far as he knew' my father and his brother were their natural children. It'd be more comforting to know for certain beyond simple misunderstandings.

Is there any site I can go to where these and other terms are explained and a recommendation for what test I take? From the simple background given above, it would appear what I need, is a test that determines whether I follow the paternal familial line. With that in mind, what kind of test do I need to do?


Are you thinking your father and your Uncle were not brothers?
Assuming the Damo in your name is the Damo we are familiar with, then I take it you are male.

If you want to determine if these two men were brothers, you could figure it out if the other has a son.
Both of you could take a Y DNA test, this type of test looks at the YDNA of males and tests the direct male line and will tell you your haplogroup (basically a mutation in the Y DNA which is passed down the male line).
You inherit your haplogroup from your father, he got his from his father, him from his father and so on going back.
This test can also estimate how far back your common male ancestor is.
You and your cousin should have the same haplogroup, as both your father's share the same father.
To confuse matters, you could also have the same haplogroup if you are not related as there are a few very common haplogroups that dominate in Ireland, so for fine scale testing for recent relatedness you are better of relying on the estimation of how many generations ago the common male ancestor is.

pinkypinky Moderator
#507

Testing your Y DNA will not confirm if your grandfather was your grandfather unless you can also test a confirmed son of his too or sibling or paternal cousin.

You need to test your father and one of the girls and see what the sibling relationship is with an autosomal DNA test. If they are full or half siblings, the amount of centimorgans will be large. See Blaine Bettinger's shared centimorgan chart.

If the previous generation is not possible, then test yourself and a cousin descending from one of the girls. You should match. If you don't then, someone is not the child of your grandfather.

DamoRed Registered User
#508

The one thing we must learn from our genealogical pursuits is to guard against assumptions! But yes, I am male.

It is thought that they are/were natural blood brothers, born naturally of their parents, as opposed to their sibling sisters who are known to have been adopted. I say were, because my father died 25 years ago and assume - that word again - his brother would also be deceased at this point, if not even before him. The difficulty arises in that the other brother emigrated to New Zealand, and apart from his daughter who visited Ireland 40 years ago, it's not known if she has any siblings, male or female. A close-knit bunch, aren't we?


Pardon my flippancy, but would a centimorgan test determine if I'm a distant cousin of Fr Ted?

pinkypinky Moderator
#509

You will definitely need to test a descendant of the brother to determine what you want, but it doesn't have to be a male. Autosomal will tell you if you are first cousins, and at that level, it is 100% correct. Best thing to do is test yourself first and then get your detective hat on to find the NZ people. You might find they've already tested.

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cat_r Registered User
#510

Autosomal DNA tests are the tests advertised on TV. Men and women can do the test to find both male and female relations using a kit from Ancestry, Family Tree DNA, MyHeritage or 23andMe. The results will show your matches and by how many centiMorgans you match. Then look at a chart of these numbers (or use an online calculator like this one https://dnapainter.com/tools/sharedcmv4) to see what the likely relationships could be. 
You mentioned doing male line testing (Y-DNA) - if you want to do that after you've done the autosomal tests, then the best company to use for the autosomal tests is Family Tree DNA (FamilyFinder test) as they can usually use the same sample to do further tests. The other companies don't do comprehensive Y-DNA testing.

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