magicbastarder Registered User
#1

is there a simple list of chemicals which you should not get near disc brake pads? i.e. would even something like a detergent cause issues with contamination; i was wondering as i was cleaning the bike earlier if i can be overcautious in cleaning the bike near the brakes.

any tips on looking after a steel frame? my latest purchase has mountings for racks and also a couple of unthreaded holes - should i tape those up to keep water out, or leave them uncovered to let the water out should it get in?

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Wishbone Ash Registered User
#2

magicbastarder said:
.. and also a couple of unthreaded holes - should i tape those up to keep water out, or leave them uncovered to let the water out should it get in?
There should be a small hole somewhere near the base of the frame to allow water out. Check the end of the chain stays - near the rear wheel dropouts.

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saccades Registered User
#3

Wishbone Ash said:
There should be a small hole somewhere near the base of the frame to allow water out. Check the end of the chain stays - near the rear wheel dropouts.


Aren't those welding gas vents?


Chemicals not get get near disc brakes - all of them... slightly tongue in cheek tbf.

No wd40, no chain oil and no car disc brake cleaner (bike brakes don't get hot enough to clean the residue off). IPA/Acetone are acceptable (cheapo nail varnish with no moisturisers), but shouldn't be needed.

They shouldn't need cleaning, just clean the bike as normal but don't add any of the above to them.

As for the steel frame - if it's put away out of the rain I reckon it'll last >20 years. There are products out there for addition to a frame internals, waxoyl probably being the worst as it's a bugger to remove and will kill any respray job down the line.

My '89 Mustang is still ridden by my dad in all weathers on a regular basis to his allotment and left outside a lot. My abused mtb which is never cleaned was waxolyed and just has surface rust on the chrome where it has been crashed. My '89 Kona has surface rust on the P2 forks where scratched. Fit bolts to the threaded holes, unless you are cycling through a river that should be enough - if you hear water sloshing about then an old school fix was drilling a hole in the lowest part of the BB to allow it to drain - not great for the BB though.

Even

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g0g Registered User
#4

Is it ok to power wash a road bike if you don't blast the BB and derailleur area?

Macy0161 Registered User
#5

Enjoyed a spin on the trails with the kids yesterday, on the old road bike. Got a hankering for CX/ Gravel bike after that, but thought I'd best have a look at the hard tail mtb first.... I knew it needed a new cassette and chain, but the front suspension was seized. It had been in a shed most of the time.

So where do I start with unseizing/ servicing the front suspension? So far I've just tried silicon oil at the top and I managed to get it to depress, but then it didn't bounce back. It's a former biking.ie Trek 5400. They're just down the road from me, so I could leave it with them, if it wasn't going to be ridiculous, but am I ultimately looking at a new fork? What type of damage would I be talking for an equivalent fork? The answer does appear to be CX bike to me!

magicbastarder Registered User
#6

saccades said:
Chemicals not get get near disc brakes - all of them... slightly tongue in cheek tbf.

No wd40, no chain oil and no car disc brake cleaner (bike brakes don't get hot enough to clean the residue off). IPA/Acetone are acceptable (cheapo nail varnish with no moisturisers), but shouldn't be needed.

cheers, i was wondering if i should be careful with the bike cleaner (specifically this stuff at the moment: http://fenwicks.info/bike/index.php/bike-cleaning/fs-10-bike-cleaner), in case that could cause contamination if washed in when rinsing the bike after cleaning.

Alek Registered User
#7

Muc Off bike cleaner says its safe for cleaning rotors and calipers.... Never had problems with braking after washing with it.

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cython Registered User
#8

g0g said:
Is it ok to power wash a road bike if you don't blast the BB and derailleur area?


Probably, though I'd add wheel hubs (unless of course you have removed the wheels ) and headset to the list of areas to avoid. Basically avoid anywhere that's apt to be greased and where said grease needs to remain in place!

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saccades Registered User
#9

cython said:
Probably, though I'd add wheel hubs (unless of course you have removed the wheels ) and headset to the list of areas to avoid. Basically avoid anywhere that's apt to be greased and where said grease needs to remain in place!



Wot Cython said. You don't want to jet wash the grease out from bearings in the hubs,headset,BB (derailurer isn't something I've ever thought about tbh), unless you are happy enough to re-pack it. Or to force ****e past the seals on a fork.

A simple effective wash is:

Remove chain (powerlink), wash mud and crap from it. You can use WD40 to force the water off it, allow to dry and then relube (removing the excess). This is #1 reason to allow WD40 near your bike, there are only 2 reasons it ever goes near to a bike.

Remove wheels as it's easier to clean the difficult bits.

A hand pumped water sprayer using bike cleaner solution (propriatory or some washing up liquid) and a brush to remove all the other muck on the frame. Use one brush for the drivechain parts and another for all the other bits.

Put the bits bits back together and use some silicon oil on the fork stanctions. Then you can take your WD40 rag and wipe over paintwork only to give it a "new" appearance and allededgly make it easier to clean the next time, this is #2 reason it goes near your bike.

It's a fairly involved process and takes quite a while.


Or do what I do - leave it all to dry, brush the mud off and re-lube the chain and every couple* of years pay a small fortune to a bike shop to fix your laziness.

* = 7 years if you use a IGH and want to destroy the fork.

@magicbastarder - I suspect that fork will take more money to repair than it is worth, but certainly pop into biking.ie and ask them to take a look at it.

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JBokeh Registered User
#10

I would be following the advise above RE power washing the bike, however I do power wash my bikes, I hit them with mud off, and give them a blast with the washer from quite a distance away, so it isn't blasting water into the bearings. It isn't a proper wash, but it stops the bikes looking like i don't look after them.

For the busted fork, i'd nearly go on eBay and get a NOS air sprung rockshox, there is a lot of them there, especially if you've a 26 inch wheel, get one with the correct steerer length, and diameter and you'll have done a serious upgrade to your bike

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doozerie Registered User
#11

Re power washing, I'd go so far as to say avoid using it near anything with bearings in it. That includes freehubs, the jockey wheels on some derailleurs (e.g. SRAM), some shifters (even ones without bearings actually), pedals (Speedplays in particular will just invite the water in and dance the bearings around in it and will laugh at you later when you discover the resulting grinding), some calipers (Campag Record spring to mind). Plus electronic components too.

In short, unless you plan to dry out and re-pack moving parts with grease, better to keep powerful water jets away from them.

Danbo! Registered User
#12

g0g said:
Is it ok to power wash a road bike if you don't blast the BB and derailleur area?


Yes it is. Power washers have very high pressure nearer the spout, but the pressure dissipates about 8-12 inches away. This actually makes it easier to accurately apply pressure to frame, rims, etc and lowers risk of hitting hubs/BB/etc.

Someone posted this video a while back. I used to have no problem cleaning my bike but didnt like to go near drive train at all, but after watching this I tackled it and it was quite easy

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5ak4AzlUz5Q

Next step for me is to learn how to properly dial in gears. I've always just dicked around with the screws and cable adjusters blindly and made a complete balls of it.

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Chuchote Registered User
#13

I have my first disc brakes having ridden for 60 years with rim brakes. What checks do I need to do on the brakes and how regularly, compared with rim brakes? I've read scary warnings that discs can fail suddenly without warning, and it's no ambition of mine to experience this.

Hungrycol Registered User
#14

I haven't cleaned my (road) bikes with water & soap for years and years. Dry baby vests are ideal (without the baby inside) and a squirt or WD40 for the stubborn bits... of the bike. I use petrol in the chain cleaning machine, just make sure you don't get any on your clothes, and WD40 for degreasing the cassette, pullies & chainset. I understand water and soap washing a mountain bike after a trails run but I really don't think it's necessary for a road bike.

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Pigeon Reaper Registered User
#15

Chuchote said:
I have my first disc brakes having ridden for 60 years with rim brakes. What checks do I need to do on the brakes and how regularly, compared with rim brakes? I've read scary warnings that discs can fail suddenly without warning, and it's no ambition of mine to experience this.


They're no more likely to fail than rim brakes. The main reason for brake fade is overheating due to constant use like an Alpine descent. Rim brakes would also have issues with the same type of use. Hydraulic brakes can fail if there's a leak in the system but this is similar to having a brake cable snap. Every once in a while check for damage and pad wear. Keep anything you wouldn't like on the old rim brakes away from the discs.

Enjoy the extra performance in the wet!

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