pedroeibar1 Registered User
#871

snobbles said:
Yes.. it looks like Alicia.
Hatton seems to be correct
Thanks

Agreed; also, the margin note is interesting – the clerk probably means gemellae/gemellas / twins but it looks like ‘gaminas’ which is quite different (urchins).

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spurious Category Moderator
#872

snobbles said:

Hatton seems to be correct but it's a very unusual name for rural Roscommon in the 1800s!
Thanks


Not a name I had ever come across, though there are a few in the 1901 census, both male and female intriguingly.

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Hesh's Umpire Registered User
#873

I believe this to be my great grandfather Edward Connell's baptism record on 10 June 1832.

Anyone have an idea of the sponsor's names? I think the parents are Patt or Patk Connell and Mary Kilbride.

Thanks in advance.

pedroeibar1 Registered User
#874

Hesh' said:

Anyone have an idea of the sponsor's names? I think the parents are Patt or Patk Connell and Mary Kilbride.

Yes to Patt Connell and Mary Kilbride; sponsors are Edw(ard) Connell and Mary Connell.

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Hesh's Umpire Registered User
#875

pedroeibar1 said:
Yes to Patt Connell and Mary Kilbride; sponsors are Edw(ard) Connell and Mary Connell.


Thanks for that

Alan259 Registered User
#876

pinkypinky said:
No, one handwriting thread for all such queries is better.

There's 2 problems here: you need someone who can speak Irish and read the old Irish script and someone who understands medical words.

I make out 2 causes, the first has something about "fola" (blood) lasting 5 days. The secondary cause is much harder but lasted 14 days. I presume the last word means certified because that's usually the last word in a cause of death section. Deimhnithe in modern Irish.


pinkypinky said:
You could ask in the Irish forum if we don't get any further with it.


pedroeibar1 said:
agus galan buidhe = and Jaundice (under II)
I'll have a look at the rest when I've a bigger screen than a phone..(and a dictionary!)


pedroeibar1 said:
Irish spelling changed definitively in the 1950’s and was simplified substantially – for example the word for ‘gone’ nowadays is ‘imithe’ which previously was spelled ‘imthighthe’. Similarly the old lettering was changed although the letters R and S had taken ‘modern’ formats earlier. By 1961, (the date of the death entry/ register), the entries should be in the ‘revised’ script, but the registrar / clerk continued with the old format.

I (a) Caidhn –na xx fola 5 lá [xxxxx of the blood 5 days]
(b) Sgamhatas, 5 lá [Phthysis 5 days] The Irish word for Phthysis (an old name for TB) is sgamhalar, I’d guess that is what the Reg. means.
II
Dáidhteacht
Fuilmheathlughach agus
[xxxx and
an galán buidhe [ jaundice] (lit. the yellow disease)
Fuilmheathlughach 14 lá [xxx 14 days]
The word for ‘consumption’ (another old word for TB) is Meathanas and ‘lugh’ means ‘swift’.

Dinneen (possibly the best dictionary of the period) is not very good on the words so it obviously is very technical language.

My take is that death was caused by TB complicated by jaundice.


tabbey said:
Swift in relation to consumption, may be his way of describing "galloping consumption" in modern times known as "miliary TB". This would mean that it was spreading to other organs, perhaps the liver in this case.


Thanks everyone for your help. Sorry for the delay in replying to ye. By using all of your helpful replies, we have:

I: (a.) ? of the blood, 5 days.

(b.) Phthisis, 5 days.

II: ? galloping consumption and jaundice, galloping consumption, 14 days.

Certified


I'll make a post soon in the Irish forum to see if they can fill in the remaining question marks. Thanks again everyone.

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pinkypinky Moderator
#877

Part hand-writing part history query.

People on this prison register from 1920 arrested for "offences under the ROJR" Although it could be an S and the FMP transcription says ROIR.

Any thoughts?

Attachments
Untitled.jpg
shanew Registered User
#878

could it be Restoration of Order in Ireland Act ?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Restoration_of_Order_in_Ireland_Act_1920

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pinkypinky Moderator
#879

Very possibly. After seeing this prison record, I looked at the military archive collections, and he has an extensive file. Active as a teenager in the Rising and the civil war.

pinkypinky Moderator
#880

Here's another please.

Groom's father's profession?

spurious Category Moderator
#881

pinkypinky said:
Here's another please.

Groom's father's profession?

Not seeing a link?

pinkypinky Moderator
#882

Yes, boards seems to have eaten it when it was down there briefly.

It won't let me upload something. I'll try again in a few mins.

pinkypinky Moderator
#883

Ah I see the problem it's a too big because it's a colour image.
It's the second marriage on the below.

Link instead so you can see other handwriting on the page.

https://churchrecords.irishgenealogy.ie/churchrecords/display-pdf.jsp?pdfName=d-80-3-6-096

spurious Category Moderator
#884

I think it's Gardener, though spelled 'Gardiner'.

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pedroeibar1 Registered User
#885

spurious said:
I think it's Gardener, though spelled 'Gardiner'.


I agree with gardener, but I'd like to see a few more examples of that (Theobald Butler) celebrant's writing to be sure of his 'G's. I think the spelling is correct, it's a 'squeezed 'e' as he always dots the 'i' (spinster, Patrick, etc.) and there is no dot over the Gardener. Is her father a Sailor, Tailor or Jailor?

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