Simon.d Registered User
#1

I've been experimenting with using aerial photography (from camera laden RC-Plane) as an archaeological surveying tool to capture 3D surface topgraphy.. Photogrammetry is a relatively new computational technique that discerns the three dimensional character of a target from a series of photos taken from slightly differing (and overlapping) perspectives. The posted picture is of a model I've created using this technique of the earthwork remains of a 17th century star fort in Duagh, Waterford (Can make it out from this Bing Satelite Image: http://binged.it/M5wsYj). Any thoughts?

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slowburner Moderator
#2

Simon.d said:
I've been experimenting with using aerial photography (from camera laden RC-Plane) as an archaeological surveying tool to capture 3D surface topgraphy.. Photogrammetry is a relatively new computational technique that discerns the three dimensional character of a target from a series of photos taken from slightly differing (and overlapping) perspectives. The posted picture is of a model I've created using this technique of the earthwork remains of a 17th century star fort in Duagh, Waterford (Can make it out from this Bing Satelite Image: http://binged.it/M5wsYj). Any thoughts?


Fascinating.
Can an image be rotated in all directions?
If so, I could see this as a powerful tool, and not just for archaeological applications.
Landscape archaeology is nothing more than refinement of the capacity for discerning topographical patterns.
Any method which aids this capacity has to be good for archaeology.
Without doubt, such a technique could reveal previously unnoticed earthworks, especially when employed at a macro level.

I can certainly think of quite a few places where I would dearly love to see your rc plane frightening the birds
If you're interested, drop me a pm to discuss.

Is the aspect in your photogrammetric image (sp.?) the same as the Bing image, by the way?

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robp Registered User
#3

Simon.d said:
I've been experimenting with using aerial photography (from camera laden RC-Plane) as an archaeological surveying tool to capture 3D surface topgraphy.. Photogrammetry is a relatively new computational technique that discerns the three dimensional character of a target from a series of photos taken from slightly differing (and overlapping) perspectives. The posted picture is of a model I've created using this technique of the earthwork remains of a 17th century star fort in Duagh, Waterford (Can make it out from this Bing Satelite Image: http://binged.it/M5wsYj). Any thoughts?



Very nice result. I surveyed that site for my undergraduate and wow it was a lot less visible using our basic surveying approach.

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Simon.d Registered User
#4

slowburner said:
Fascinating.
Can an image be rotated in all directions?
If so, I could see this as a powerful tool, and not just for archaeological applications.

It's a 3d model, that can be spun round in all directions... Here's another output from it:

slowburner said:

Is the aspect in your photogrammetric image (sp.?) the same as the Bing image, by the way?


The aspect I posted of the model is from a North West point of view. You can see the depression of the stream (partially cut off) in the model going along the north & west edges of the site, which should help you line it up with the Bing satelite perspective....

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dr gonzo Registered User
#5

Very interesting and very well done! You might be interested to know that remote control planes and the like are actually being used in archaeology at present to a smallish degree. I believe ROV's are being used to great effect in the Vale of Pickering in Yorkshire at present, although I havent seen the results.

That is not to take away from what youre carrying out yourself of course. Keep up the excellent work and throw stuff up here when you can, I'm sure I'm not alone is wanting to see more of what youre coming up with.

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Briskit Registered User
#6

Interesting work there Simon.d

It's amazing what the individual can get around to doing in this day and age without needing €millions on equipment. I'm sure you've invested plenty in your RC plane and the technology you're using, but it is still very impressive to see you end result like that... especially how you can rotate it around and view if from all angles.

The RC aspect also gives the individual that extra capactity to get to places where a hiker might not be able to go... Very good of you to have highlighted this method your using as its always nice to learn something new.

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slowburner Moderator
#7

Incredible imagery.

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slowburner Moderator
#8

Bit of an aside, but I wonder what the ridges are in this area?





Image above is from here in the original image

Attachments
08.15.04.jpg image.jpg
Simon.d Registered User
#9

slowburner said:
Bit of an aside, but I wonder what the ridges are in this area?




I think this is them: https://maps.google.ie/maps/myplaces?ll=53.719492,-6.481376&spn=0.015364,0.042272&ctz=-60&t=h&z=15 .. Mushroom Farm?

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slowburner Moderator
#10

I'd guess you're spot on there.

It's interesting to note how the topographical feature eastward of the mushroom farm, is not visible in the Google image.

Briskit Registered User
#11

Simon.d said:


Imagine if google maps had a LIDAR layer..



...A Really Nice preview of the future there... I hope... you did a very nice job of accurately overlaying the two shots...

Is there anyway of creating an animated gif like the one you just did, but where the laser image would only be seen if you held the cursor over the image? so that you could interchange the picture at the rate you want it??

Thanks for the cake by the way, it's always just a thing with me with always trying to eat some of it!!

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Simon.d Registered User
#12

Briskit said:

Is there anyway of creating an animated gif like the one you just did, but where the laser image would only be seen if you held the cursor over the image? so that you could interchange the picture at the rate you want it??


I don't think it can be done with a gif, but you can you can use arrow keys to alternate them here: http://imgur.com/a/cDl4j#1

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Briskit Registered User
#13

Simon.d said:
I don't think it can be done with a gif, but you can you can use arrow keys to alternate them here: http://imgur.com/a/cDl4j#1


Super... absolutely spot on... just tried this here and its the bees knees... exactly what I wanted...

Also, you're introducing me to a new 'photobucket' type site in imgur. Many Thanks. Love finding out new things and also good websites.

Funny... you come to the Archaeological forum and you end up talking about the future & google earth etc., and getting more abreast of technological updates... Cool paradox

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slowburner Moderator
#14

Briskit said:
Super... absolutely spot on... just tried this here and its the bees knees... exactly what I wanted...

Also, you're introducing me to a new 'photobucket' type site in imgur. Many Thanks. Love finding out new things and also good websites.

Funny... you come to the Archaeological forum and you end up talking about the future & google earth etc., and getting more abreast of technological updates... Cool paradox

Well if the technical wizardry here is anything to go by...who says archaeology is all dirt and sweat.

Thinking even further into the future, I suspect a time will come when excavation will be looked back on with horror.
Without doubt a technology will be developed which will give as much (if not more) information about a site, and without any form of destruction.
I heard recently of a geo-physics technology which can detect the existence of buried human remains up to two hundred years old.
It's something to do with the conductivity of the soil in the immediate area being altered by the decomposition of electrolytes in the corpse.

I often wonder to what extent archaeology is the developer of such technologies, rather than the borrower.

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slowburner Moderator
#15

Simon.d said:
Here's an attempt to clarify what's what:


There's a faint indication on the LIDAR of a large circular enclosure (about 100m in diameter) evident around this mound to the north of the soccer pitch https://maps.google.ie/maps/myplaces?ll=53.718822,-6.472235&spn=0.00096,0.002642&ctz=-60&t=h&z=19

Imagine if google maps had a LIDAR layer..

That's the one I was referring to above.

Thanks for the gif but it should probably come with a health warning - you know, like when they warn about flash photography before a tv clip.

Thank heavens Google doesn't have access to Lidar...yet, I'd never get away from the screen.

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