eurotrotter Registered User
#1

Hi guys

hope yer all well

my dad has an ipad and a crappy windows 7 laptop from dell.

both device struggle to receive the wifi signal in the conservatory in our family home.

The wireless router is upstairs and quite the distance from the conservatory (and cannot be relocated to somewhere near the conservatory).

I heard that you can buy signal boosters that will amplify the signal and in this case, offer acceptably quick internet in the conservatory.

I am wondering if someone can recommend a signal booster.

If it matters, the family home is running on UPC internet.

Thanks,
Ed

#3



Range extenders/repeaters half the throughput of your original network and add lots of latency, they don't tell you in the small print. I avoid them, nothing but trouble.

1 person has thanked this post
Alun Registered User
#4

You can also get homeplug/powerline based extenders. They're not cheap though.

See http://tinyurl.com/6jentkb for an example.

In this case you're creating a separate wifi network and connecting this through your houses mains wiring to an ethernet port on your router.

kindalen Registered User
#5

have same issue with upc router, get signal but can be weak.
was going to try a better antenna first? any good ones for the cisco router?

#6

Alun said:

In this case you're creating a separate wifi network and connecting this through your houses mains wiring to an ethernet port on your router.


You don't need to do this, you can give this wireless the same SSID and encryption type as the original wifi router and key and your laptops phone etc will roam from one to the other

bikie1280 Registered User
#7

Hi, forgive my stupidity but if you connect one of the home plugs to the original router via the eternet cable will the wifi signal then be available ( and stronger) in the room that you plug the second homeplug into? Thanks

#8

bikie1280 said:
Hi, forgive my stupidity but if you connect one of the home plugs to the original router via the eternet cable will the wifi signal then be available ( and stronger) in the room that you plug the second homeplug into? Thanks


That is correct. Another option is to run a cable from the existing wireless router to a point that is closer to the conservatory, and install a new wifi Access point.

Here's an example of one (NOTE: I have not used this myself, but I would if in your position)

http://www.dabs.ie/products/edimax-ew-7228apn-wireless-n-150-range-extender-5-port-sw-7BJQ.html?q=access%20point&src=16


If you do this, you should configure the wireless router AND the access point so that they use different channels. Confusingly, it is not sufficient to make sure the channel numbers are different - they should be at least 5 channels apart - so you could run one of them on channel 1, the other on any channel higher than 6.

If you have the scope to wire a couple of metres closer, then this would be worth a try.

I have seen powerline/homeplug work well, too. Many adaptors do not have wi-fi, though, so be careful which one you choose.

Whether using a powerline adaptor or installing another access point, i'd recommend that you choose one that supports 802.11n , to at least 150Mbps.

Hope this all isnt too complicated!

Cheers, FoxT

1 person has thanked this post
#9

To complicate things even further, and by the way, thanks to the poster who said wifi extenders affect latency and network performance.

I noticed this morning when reading the news on my phone before I got up that I was not connected via wifi to my network, but instead to the pub downstairs. Fine for the news, but I dont really want anyone else on the network able to sniff my email credentials.

What I have decided to do, is get a wireless to ethernet bridge, and a second Wireless AP. I'll set up both in my hallway area, and it should be enough to boost it into the bedroom.

This would also be a possible solution for the OP.

leeballs Registered User
#10

Sorry but i am not really understanding all this.

I have a wireless internet modem and want to receive a better signal at a different location in the house.

You guys are saying that boosters are not the way to go? From what i have read homeplugs and powerlines can cause problems.

What do you guys think about something like this?
http://www.ebay.ie/itm/WiFi-Antenna-Biquad-MACH-3B-N-Adpt-Wireless-Booster-Long-Range-GET-FREE-INTERNET-/141040850901?pt=US_Networking_Boosters_Extenders_Antennas&hash=item20d6b097d5

Thanks

#11

leeballs said:
Sorry but i am not really understanding all this.

I have a wireless internet modem and want to receive a better signal at a different location in the house.

You guys are saying that boosters are not the way to go? From what i have read homeplugs and powerlines can cause problems.

What do you guys think about something like this?
http://www.ebay.ie/itm/WiFi-Antenna-Biquad-MACH-3B-N-Adpt-Wireless-Booster-Long-Range-GET-FREE-INTERNET-/141040850901?pt=US_Networking_Boosters_Extenders_Antennas&hash=item20d6b097d5

Thanks


Wireless is two way traffic, the above might work if you add one to your router and a second attached to your laptop or device

TBH, as already said, you should just run cable or use homeplugs to get a connection to the other room, then add an AP (on a channel well away from existing) covering that area. These ones come with a built in AP.
http://www.amazon.co.uk/TP-Link-TL-WPA281KIT-Wireless-Powerline-Extender/dp/B0067GS29W/ref=sr_1_7?ie=UTF8&qid=1378489616&sr=8-7&keywords=homeplugs+wifi

leeballs Registered User
#12

Ok thanks for the info,

I purchased http://www.ebay.com/itm/310542389849?ssPageName=STRK:MEWNX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1439.l2648

I will report back when i get it

Thanks.

#13

leeballs said:
Ok thanks for the info,

I purchased http://www.ebay.com/itm/310542389849?ssPageName=STRK:MEWNX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1439.l2648

I will report back when i get it

Thanks.


That's a repeater not a home plug AP

leeballs Registered User
#14

hmm are they not the same thing or do they not work on the same principle? sorry if these are stupid questions. when i see a plug socket i would presume the signal is transported through the electrical conductor

#15

leeballs said:
hmm are they not the same thing or do they not work on the same principle? sorry if these are stupid questions. when i see a plug socket i would presume the signal is transported through the electrical conductor


No, the clue is in the word, repeater. Homeplugs use your electrical circuitry to connect to your router, you use them in pairs. This is just a repeater, the plug connector is just for power, it connects to your original router by wireless which as already mentioned in this thread has it's issues (halves throughput and high latency)

Want to share your thoughts?

Login here to discuss!