noodler Registered User
#1

Firstly, this may be better in the banking forum so mods let me know,.

Second, I am not asking for financial advice here - just wondering if anybody can clarify how this would work.


It is well documented that tracker mortgages are losing banks money and so they are quite likely to give you a discount on your outstanding balance of 40,000 (for example) - lets say they accept 30,000 in a lump sum to completely wipe the debt.

However, in the situation where the mortgage is at a variable rate...is there any advantage to the bank to provide a discount on a lump sum repayment? In the above example where there is an outstanding balance of 40k but on a variable rate, would there be any advantage to the bank in accepting a lump sum figure of less than 40k to wipe this debt clean?

Duckjob Registered User
#2

noodler said:
Firstly, this may be better in the banking forum so mods let me know,.

Second, I am not asking for financial advice here - just wondering if anybody can clarify how this would work.


It is well documented that tracker mortgages are losing banks money and so they are quite likely to give you a discount on your outstanding balance of 40,000 (for example) - lets say they accept 30,000 in a lump sum to completely wipe the debt.

However, in the situation where the mortgage is at a variable rate...is there any advantage to the bank to provide a discount on a lump sum repayment? In the above example where there is an outstanding balance of 40k but on a variable rate, would there be any advantage to the bank in accepting a lump sum figure of less than 40k to wipe this debt clean?


Open to correction here, but I don't think so.

Paying off portions of a loan early that is on variable rate just means that the bank will make less money out of you. They would sooner you pay over the agreed term so they can charge you interest over that term.

3 people have thanked this post
noodler Registered User
#3

Duckjob said:
Open to correction here, but I don't think so.

Paying off portions of a loan early that is on variable rate just means that the bank will make less money out of you. They would sooner you pay over the agreed term so they can charge you interest over that term.


Hmm, yes definitely my first thought.

I was just wondering if there was some Net Present Value angle to this where they would prefer '40,000 minus X' now rather than 40,000 over the next couple of years.

#4

noodler said:
Firstly, this may be better in the banking forum so mods let me know,.

Second, I am not asking for financial advice here - just wondering if anybody can clarify how this would work.


It is well documented that tracker mortgages are losing banks money and so they are quite likely to give you a discount on your outstanding balance of 40,000 (for example) - lets say they accept 30,000 in a lump sum to completely wipe the debt.

However, in the situation where the mortgage is at a variable rate...is there any advantage to the bank to provide a discount on a lump sum repayment? In the above example where there is an outstanding balance of 40k but on a variable rate, would there be any advantage to the bank in accepting a lump sum figure of less than 40k to wipe this debt clean?



There is anecdotal evidence that they are doing deals. All of the banks are cash hungry at the moment and need to get their gearing down and their cash reserves up. If the borrower is in arrears they will almost certainly accept a sum lower than that offered.

The_Conductor Moderator
#5

Milk & Honey;78736579
There is anecdotal evidence that they are doing deals. All of the banks are cash hungry at the moment and need to get their gearing down and their cash reserves up. If the borrower is in arrears they will almost certainly accept a sum lower than that offered.


Not entirely true- keep in mind the ECB have lent 1 trillion (1,000 Billion) Euro to European banks on 3 year, 2.5% rates- the European banking sector hasn't been as well capitalised in a long while. The issue is no-one wants to lend.

If you are willing to give up a tracker- you might expect to get a discount of up to 20-25% on the amount outstanding.

If you're repaying a variable rate mortgage early- it depends on the term, and the amount you're repaying- but typically, you'd expect to pay an early exit fee of up to 10-15% of the gross amount.

You will not get a discount on a variable rate mortgage if you repay it early- you will in fact have to pay an early repayment penalty- as you are costing the lending institution future earnings.

This is normal.

Mouldy Mary Banned
#6

Milk & Honey;78736579
There is anecdotal evidence that they are doing deals. All of the banks are cash hungry at the moment and need to get their gearing down and their cash reserves up. If the borrower is in arrears they will almost certainly accept a sum lower than that offered.


Not entirely true- keep in mind the ECB have lent 1 trillion (1,000 Billion) Euro to European banks on 3 year, 2.5% rates- the European banking sector hasn't been as well capitalised in a long while. The issue is no-one wants to lend.

If you are willing to give up a tracker- you might expect to get a discount of up to 20-25% on the amount outstanding.

If you're repaying a variable rate mortgage early- it depends on the term, and the amount you're repaying- but typically, you'd expect to pay an early exit fee of up to 10-15% of the gross amount.

You will not get a discount on a variable rate mortgage if you repay it early- you will in fact have to pay an early repayment penalty- as you are costing the lending institution future earnings.

This is normal.

Retention charges on mortgages were abolished in the 1980s by minister John Boland. The only charges allowed are for exiting a fixed rate.

4 people have thanked this post
Kosseegan Banned
#7

smccarrick said:
Not entirely true- keep in mind the ECB have lent 1 trillion (1,000 Billion) Euro to European banks on 3 year, 2.5% rates- the European banking sector hasn't been as well capitalised in a long while. The issue is no-one wants to lend.

If you are willing to give up a tracker- you might expect to get a discount of up to 20-25% on the amount outstanding.

If you're repaying a variable rate mortgage early- it depends on the term, and the amount you're repaying- but typically, you'd expect to pay an early exit fee of up to 10-15% of the gross amount.

You will not get a discount on a variable rate mortgage if you repay it early- you will in fact have to pay an early repayment penalty- as you are costing the lending institution future earnings.

This is normal.

Irish banks are broke. The ECB money must be paid back. The banks will have to get another bail out in 2014 if they haven't deleveraged. They are scrambling everywhere for cash at the moment. They are forcing people with interest only loans to repay capital, thereby losing out on future profits for themselves.

As for redemption charges where are you getting 10-15% from?

http://www.bailii.org/ie/legis/num_reg/1987/0339.html

noodler Registered User
#8

Many thanks to the last two posters for the information on no exit charges.

The account in question is actually with a building society.

If I were to go ahead and meet a bank manager regarding this issue and make them an offer below the total outstanding to wipe the debt (I understand it would likely be a minor discount if any as it is a variable mortgage), I would like to bring a professional with me to this meeting, would a solicitor or accountant be best or can somebody recommend another profession?


smccarrick said:

You will not get a discount on a variable rate mortgage if you repay it early- you will in fact have to pay an early repayment penalty- as you are costing the lending institution future earnings.

This is normal.


I don't think this is as clear cut as you are making out. When issues like NPV and inflation are taken into account there may be genuine financial preference for a bank to have 37,000 right now, rather than 40,000 over the next 8 years.

Appreciate all the posts guys.

Kosseegan Banned
#9

noodler said:
Many thanks to the last two posters for the information on no exit charges.

The account in question is actually with a building society.

If I were to go ahead and meet a bank manager regarding this issue and make them an offer below the total outstanding to wipe the debt (I understand it would likely be a minor discount if any as it is a variable mortgage), I would like to bring a professional with me to this meeting, would a solicitor or accountant be best or can somebody recommend another profession?


I don't think this is as clear cut as you are making out. When issues like NPV and inflation are taken into account there may be genuine financial preference for a bank to have 37,000 right now, rather than 40,000 over the next 8 years.

Appreciate all the posts guys.


There are individuals specialising in debt resolution with banks from a variety of backgrounds. Some accounting, some legal. The vast majority are dealing with arrears cases. Depending on whether you are worried about your credit rating you could look at engineering an arrears situation.

noodler Registered User
#10

Kosseegan said:
There are individuals specialising in debt resolution with banks from a variety of backgrounds. Some accounting, some legal. The vast majority are dealing with arrears cases. Depending on whether you are worried about your credit rating you could look at engineering an arrears situation.


Ah, definitely not..if your suggestion is entering arrears purposely to scare the bank into accepting a lower offer.

This isn't an arrears case.

phormium Registered User
#11

I think, my personal opinion only, that you haven't a hope in hell of getting a discount on a variable rate loan. The banks have enough problems with arrears and I think there is no one in the bank to make this sort of decision, they can't make the most straightforward decisions not to mind something out of the ordinary like this. A bank manager will have no authority whatsoever to do something like this and will have to refer it up the line and no one is going to put their ass on the line by signing off on it. It's cya all the way in the banks these days.

#12

I tried it with a tracker mortgage with EBS. The rate was ECB + 0.6%. The branch manager said "we don't have a product for that". I contacted the CEO who said they didn't think it was a good idea. It wasn't an arrears situation, I was just looking for a deal that was a win-win for both of us.

#13

I tried this with a tracker mortgage (ECB +.75%) at Ulster bank last year, was willing to give them €80k cash but they said they had no interest in deals of this type and their tracker mortgages were still profitable?!! I think the key thing was that our mortgage was not in arrears and we had never been late on any repayments in nearly 7 years, they are only doing deals when they think people can't afford the repayments. Also, if governments and the ECB keep bailing them out, they don't need to engage in these kinds of deals so there's little incentive for them to do this.

#14

realgirl said:
I tried this with a tracker mortgage (ECB +.75%) at Ulster bank last year, was willing to give them €80k cash but they said they had no interest in deals of this type and their tracker mortgages were still profitable?!! I think the key thing was that our mortgage was not in arrears and we had never been late on any repayments in nearly 7 years, they are only doing deals when they think people can't afford the repayments. Also, if governments and the ECB keep bailing them out, they don't need to engage in these kinds of deals so there's little incentive for them to do this.


Ulster bank are foreign owned. They are in a far different position to Irish banks.

The_Conductor Moderator
#15

Milk & Honey;78762673
Ulster bank are foreign owned. They are in a far different position to Irish banks.


True, however their Irish loan book is denominated in Euro, which is borrowed from the ECB, the same as the other lenders in the Irish market. They have been more forthright at discounting troubled mortgages- as evidenced by the continuous life support they demand from RBS, however, they, along with BOI- have little or no interest as private entities in facilitating write downs on book values (other than on a limited case-by-case basis). They have made offers along these lines to a few customers- however there is no corporate policy implementing this at present.

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